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Submission + - Clearing Up Wayland FUD, Misconceptions (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In clearing up common misconceptions about Wayland (e.g. it breaking compatibility with the Linux desktop and it not supporting remote desktops like X), Eric Griffith (a Linux developer) and Daniel Stone (a veteran X.Org developer) have written The Wayland Situation in which they clearly explain the facts about the shortcomings of X, the corrections made by Wayland, misconceptions about Wayland, and the advantages to this alternative to Canonical's in-development Mir.
Privacy

Submission + - Students protest biometric scanner move (thenorthernecho.co.uk)

Presto Vivace writes: "Newcastle University students protest biometric scanner move

UNIVERSITY students may have to scan their fingerprints in future — to prove they are not bunking off lectures. ... ... Newcastle Free Education Network has organised protests against the plans, claiming the scanners would "'turn universities into border checkpoints" and "reduce university to the attendance of lectures alone".

"

Piracy

Submission + - Music Industry Threatens to Bankrupt Pirate Party Members (torrentfreak.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Music industry group the BPI has threatened legal action against six members of the UK Pirate Party, after the party refused to take its Pirate Bay proxy offline. BPI seems to want to hold the individual members of the party responsible for copyright infringements that may occurs via the proxy, which puts them at risk of personal bankruptcy.

Pirate Party leader Loz Kaye criticized the latest music industry threats and reiterated that blocking The Pirate Bay is a disproportionate measure.

Technology

Submission + - It's Full of Eyes: Drones at Home Coming Soon (patexia.com)

ericjones12398 writes: "When the boys came home from World War II, the US changed forever. An economic boom, a baby boom, new technology, new ideas, new ways of looking at the world and our place in it. Something similar is about to happen, once the boys come back from Afghanistan... "boys" meaning Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), known by most of us as drones.
Drones aren't likely to inspire the next baby boom, but they're a perfect example of a classic route of technological innovation — namely, from the research labs and hobbyists to the military and thence to commercial and mainstream usage (a development path similar to some other quirky experiments over the years, such as the Internet). Already, the drone market is worth nearly $6 billion, and expected to double over the next ten years."

Data Storage

Submission + - low power shared storage

An anonymous reader writes: 've been trying to come up with a very low power overhead way to share a disk between two systems. The goal is a cluster that uses less than 5 watts total when under low load (panda board; USB attached disk), and can kick up to a more powerful x86 based system as needed (rarely). The power budget of 5 watts in low power mode is a hard budget.

Dual port 2.5" 5400-7200 rpm SATA disks would be ideal (if they existed). Using a SATA to dual port SAS interposer or 2.5" dual port SAS disk is out unless someone knows of a SAS to USB adapter-- I could not find such a thing.

Firewire could be an option, as there are some dual port enclosures available, but I would need some sort of firewire to USB adapter.

Using a NAS, even something like a single disk WD mybook uses more power by itself than I want the entire system to use when in low power mode.

Using the panda to serve up its usb attached disk to the more powerful system e.g., over NFS is less than ideal due to IO requirements when under load. But, so far this seems to be the only way to make this system work within the other design constraints.

Ideas? I expect, "Poster has impossible requirements, and can't find a solution." responses, but I hope someone will have something. A link to some obscure SAS to USB adapter on a site that Google doesn't index, though improbable, would be very nice. Or, a completely different way to approach problem, keeping in mind the hard requirement for 5W power budget for the low power mode, and moderately heavy IO for the rare high power mode.
Science

Submission + - Cat parasite may increase risk of suicide in humans 1

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at the University of Maryland analyzing meticulous data collected by Danish authorities have identified a positive correlation between suicides among women with infection with the fairly common parasite T. gondii. Carriers were 53 percent more likely to commit suicide in a sample of 45,000 Danish women monitored for over a decade (researchers believe that the same correlation likely exists for men). Increased susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was also discovered. The physiological mechanism has not been determined, although some speculation centers around changes to dopamine levels. Two intriguing aspects were noted: 1) human infection often (but not always) begins by exposure to cats carrying the parasite, for example, by changing an infected animal's litter; and 2) the parasite spreads itself by infecting the nervous system of rodents, causing them to become suicidally attracted to feline odors which will increase the likelihood of their hosts being eaten by cats, whose digestive tracts provide the preferred environment for parasite reproduction.

Feed Google News Sci Tech: Court Clears Samsung Galaxy Nexus For Sale But Patent Battle Continues - Wired N (google.com)


Wired News

Court Clears Samsung Galaxy Nexus For Sale But Patent Battle Continues
Wired News
By Nathan Olivarez-Giles The Galaxy Nexus is at the center of a patent dispute between Apple and Samsung and, after a week of being banned from sale, is now cleared to be sold again. Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired Winning a minor victory in its patent ...
Galaxy Nexus reappears in Google Play storeCNET
Fly Or Die: Samsung Galaxy S IIITechCrunch
Samsung said to develop Windows tablet, loses Galaxy 10.1 rulingLos Angeles Times
Businessweek-ZDNet-Reuters
all 1,173 news articles

Science

Submission + - Scientists Investigate Possible Radiation Murder 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Christian Science Monitor reports that tests carried out at the Institut de Radiophysique on Yasser Arafat’s final personal belongings – his clothes, his toothbrush, even his iconic kaffiyeh — found that there was a high level of polonium inside his body when he died suggesting Arafat may have been poisoned with the same radioactive element that Russian agents used to kill Alexander Litvinenko in 2006. Polonium is a rare element, hard for anyone but a national government to get its hands on and dangerous to handle. "Its presence on Arafat's belongings is certainly suggestive," writes Dan Murphy. "But it's also not out of the realm of possibility that it was added to his effects after his death (though, again, it's very difficult to obtain). Only if his body is exhumed — carefully, under supervision by professionals guarding against tampering — can suspicion congeal into fact." Suha Arafat, who was 27 years old when she married the 61-year-old Arafat in in 1990, told Francois Bochud, who heads the Institute of Radiation Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland that she'd kept the clothing and other items tested at her lawyer's office in Paris until early this year, when she asked Al Jazeera to have the items tested on her behalf. Now Suha is calling for the Palestinian Authority to exhume Arafat's body for further testing. "When Arafat died there was an avalanche of speculation that it was foul play," writes Murphy. "If solid evidence does emerge he was murdered, after a proper autopsy is done, then a storm could start to break.""

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