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Submission + - 'Macabre' Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: By connecting the circulatory systems of young mice to old ones--a technique first pioneered in the nineteenth century--researchers have found a way to rejuvinate the hearts of old mice. Formerly stiff, thick cardiac tissue became young and supple, thanks to a hormone that circulates in the blood of young mice but that's lacking in older mice. "This is probably the first handle we have on what makes the heart young and what makes it old," says one expert.

Submission + - The Internet Archive is now the Largest collection of Historical Software (paritynews.com) 1

hypnosec writes: The Internet Archive has a great collection of books, music, visual items and websites but, it had one thing lacking up until now – archive of software. This has changed recently as The Internet Archive now holds the largest collection of software in the world and has challenged everyone to find a bigger one. The expansion at the Internet Archive has come through collaboration with other independent archives like that Disk Drives collection, the FTP site boneyard, Shareware CD Archive, and the TOSEC archive. The archive doesn’t hold just the software – it also holds documentation as well.

Submission + - "Dark Lightning" Could Expose Airline Passengers To Radiation

mbstone writes: Lightning researcher Joseph Dwyer of the Florida Institute of Technology claims that thunderstorms unleash sprays of X-rays and even intense bursts of gamma rays which could cause airline passengers to receive in an instant the maximum safe lifetime dose of ionizing radiation — the kind that wreaks the most havoc on the human body. Dwyer hopes rove hopes his sensor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, will provide more data.
Crime

Submission + - DOJ, MIT, JSTOR Seek Anonymity in Swartz Case

theodp writes: Responding to an earlier request by the estate of Aaron Swartz to disclose the names of those involved in the events leading to Aaron's suicide, counsel for MIT snippily told the Court, "The Swartz Estate was not a party to the criminal case, and therefore it is unclear how it has standing, or any legally cognizable interest, to petition for the modification of the Protective Order concerning others' documents." In motions filed on slow-news-day Good Friday (MIT's on spring break), the DOJ, MIT, and JSTOR all insisted on anonymity for those involved in the Swartz case, arguing that redacting of names was a must, citing threats posed by Anonymous and LulzSec, a badly-photoshopped postcard sent to Assistant U.S. Attorney Stephen Heymann and another sent to his Harvard Prof father, cake frosting, a gun hoax, and e-mail sent to MIT. From the DOJ filing: 'I also informed him [Swartz estate lawyer] that whatever additional public benefit might exist by disclosing certain names was, in this case, outweighed by the risk to those individuals of becoming targets of threats, harassment and abuse.' From the MIT filing: 'The publication of MIT's documents in unredacted form could lead to further, more targeted, and more dangerous threats and attacks...The death of Mr. Swartz has created a very volatile atmosphere.' From the JSTOR filing: 'The supercharged nature of the public debate about this case, including hacking incidents, gun hoaxes and threatening messages, gives JSTOR and its employees legitimate concern for their safety and privacy.'
Biotech

Submission + - A new genetic code found (bytesizebio.net)

Shipud writes: A group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Yale University and the Joint Genome Institute have isolated single cells of otherwise elusive and unculturable SR1 bacteria and sequenced their genomes. They found that SR1 deviate from the genetic code in a way previously unknown: what codes for "stop making proteins" in most organisms, is used differently in SR1, to actually continue making them. This study shows the power of a new technology, single-cell DNA sequencing, to reveal genetic information. SR1 bacteria are found in our mouths, and are suspected to cause periodontitis.
Iphone

Submission + - Duolingo's New App: Offline Language Lessons (duolingo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: As you may know, Duolingo is a worldwide chart-topping iPhone language learning app and website that is 100% free — and scientifically proven to work. It just announced the global availability of the latest major update of Duolingo for iPhone, enabling speaking exercises and offline lessons. Today’s iPhone user wants to do more than play games or check in with friends — and Duolingo’s fun, challenging and effective language learning app is the perfect activity on the go. Millions of users are learning a language from scratch or advancing their study, in just minutes a day and with total convenience — in the subway, on an airplane flight, and everywhere in between. Since launching in November 2012, Duolingo has been downloaded over a million times and has a perfect 5-star rating and top ranking without any marketing support from Apple. Duolingo is available to learn Spanish, English, Portuguese, French, German and Italian.

Duolingo is a unique language learning system that is supported by crowdsourced translation. For further information, see his presentation on TED.com. Duolingo was created by Carnegie Mellon computer science professor Luis von Ahn and his graduate student Severin Hacker. Read for more information on Dr. von Ahn: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_von_Ahn

This recent effectiveness study suggests that Duolingo may be more effective than college language classes:
http://techcrunch.com/2013/01/17/study-learning-spanish-with-duolingo-can-be-more-effective-than-college-classes-or-rosetta-stone/

Submission + - EFF jumps in to defend bloggers being sued by Prenda (eff.org)

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "The Electronic Frontier Foundation has entered the fray to defend the bloggers sued by Prenda Law Firm. Prenda, oblivious to such well known legal niceties as the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the affirmative defense of truth, the difference between a defamatory statement of fact and the expression of a negative opinion, and the First Amendment, has immediately — and illegally — sought to subpoena information leading to the identities of the bloggers. I would not be surprised to see these "lawyers" get into even more hot water than they're already in. And I take my hat off to the EFF for stepping in here."

Submission + - Mineral tech in dishwashers, natural heating by zeolite; this is cool (dishwashersinfo.com)

way2trivial writes: This is cool, Bosch is using zeolite to reduce the energy consumption of some washing machines by having it generate heat at the end of the wash cycle, then takes the water back out for the next cycle by heating it.
Better living through chemistry indeed!

It makes me wonder that I never considered;
disposable handwarmers~
can I recycle them by overheating them dry??

Submission + - Free Open Source Emoji Project on KickStarter (kickstarter.com)

Kagetsuki writes: There's a project on KickStarter for a Free and Open set of emoji [the grapical emoticon glyph set which has a block reserved in Unicode]. Currently there are no full sets of Emoji that are completely free (as in beer and and freedom), so if this project gets funded it will be the first and only set of emoji that can, say, be distributed with FLOSS Linux/BSD/GNU systems. Not to mention anyone will be able to incorporate them into any project without any restrictive conditions. Check it out at http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/374397522/phantom-open-emoji .
Science

Submission + - White House Pledges Open Access to Publicly-Funded Research (whitehouse.gov)

Alpert8 writes: "Dr. John Holdren, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology, released a response today today to a petition on asking for free public access to journal articles arising from taxpayer-funded research. In it, Dr. Holdren acknowledges the importance of the free exchange of information, and on behalf of the Obama Administration, he has written a memo asking federal agencies that provide over $100M in research funding to submit a plan within six months on how they will implement public access. The goal would be to have these journal articles freely available on the internet within 12 months of the publication data. The National Institutes of Health have done a marvelous job of providing access to NIH-funded research, and this policy is in the same vein."
Science

Submission + - Electricity Gives Bubbles Super Strength (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Left to its own devices, a bubble will weaken and pop as the fluid sandwiched between two thin layers of soap succumbs to gravity and drains toward the floor. But when researchers trapped a bubble between two platinum electrodes and cranked up the voltage, the fluid reversed direction and actually flowed up, against the force of gravity. The newly strong and stable bubbles could live for hours, and even visibly change colors as their walls grew fatter. Because soap film is naturally only nanometers thick, this whimsical experiment could help scientists create more efficient labs-on-chips, the mazes of nanotunnels that can diagnose disease based on the movements of a miniscule drop of blood.
Biotech

Submission + - Did viruses evolve from an extinct domain of life? (bytesizebio.net)

Shipud writes: A study was recently published by a group from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign . The authors analyzed the structures of proteins found in the genomes of organisms from the three domains of life. Those domains are eukarya which includes all plant, animals, fungi and some microbes; bacteria, and archaea which is a group of single-celled microorganisms distinct from eukarya and bacteria. The researchers also included a group of viruses known as NCLDVs (Nucelocyptoplasmic Large DNA viruses), Their conclusion is these viruses may have evolved from a, now extinct, fourth domain of life. Viruses are not considered to be alive, or even to have a place on the universal tree of life, by most researchers. So their claim has far-reaching consequences in our understanding of the origins of life.
Cloud

Submission + - The Cloud Will Expand Human Brain Capacity: Kurzweil (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: "Futurist and author Ray Kurzweil predicts the cloud will eventually do more than store our emails or feed us streaming movies on demand: it’s going to help expand our brain capacity beyond its current limits.

In a question-and-answer session following a speech to the DEMO technology conference in Santa Clara, California last week, Kurzweil described the human brain as impressive but limited in its capacity to hold information. “By the time we’re even 20, we’ve filled it up,” he said, adding that the only way to add information after that point is to “repurpose our neocortex to learn something new.” (Computerworld has posted up the full video of the talk.)

The solution to overcoming the brain’s limitations, he added, involves “basically expanding our brains into the cloud.”"

The Internet

Submission + - Sales of unused IPv4 addresses gaining steam (networkworld.com)

netbuzz writes: "A growing number of U.S. carriers and enterprises are hedging their bets on IPv6 by purchasing blocks of unused IPv4 addresses through official channels or behind-the-scenes deals. There is certainly no shortage of stock, as these address brokers have blocks available that range from 65,000 to more than a million IPv4 addresses. And it’s not just large companies and institutions benefiting, as one attorney who’s involved in the market says he represents a woman who came into possession of a block of IPv4 address in the early ‘90s and now, “She’s in her 70s, and she’s going to have a windfall.’’"
Space

Submission + - DARPA Funds "100 Year Starship" to Develop Human Interstellar Travel (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Voyager 1, which is now in the outermost layer of the heliosphere that forms the boundary between the Solar System and interstellar space, is set to be the first man-made object to leave the Solar System. It has taken the car-sized probe over 35 years to reach its current point, but at its current speed of about 3.6 AU (334,640,905 miles) per year it would take over 75,000 years to reach our nearest star, Proxima Centauri. Despite the mind-boggling distances involved, DARPA has just awarded funding to form an organization whose aim is to make human interstellar travel a reality within the next century.

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