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Submission + - Why are we still using A2DP? 2

nightfire-unique writes: "I recently bought a "7.1" channel wireless gaming headset, and it's spectacular. It got me thinking.

Why is it that we're still using (for the most part) Bluetooth 2.x + A2DP for mobile wireless headphones? Anyone who has used them will be familiar with the problems: high latency (causing audio sync problems, particularly with games), excessive audio compression, long connection times, insufficient radio power (causing frequent drop-outs and subsequent pitch bending), a limit of two channels, etc.

Virtually everyone I know with a smartphone uses headphones to listen to media content. Isn't it time to add a dedicated wireless media chip to our mobile devices? Something capable of higher power output, low-latency uncompressed multichannel audio, and instant connection? A datagram service with forward error correction could virtually eliminate transient signal loss.

While such a device could draw more power than A2DP (in high-bandwidth mode), even this could be mitigated by presenting the user with and option to reduce bandwidth/channels/quality.

So my question is, why hasn't this been invented and deployed yet? Are vendors waiting on Bluetooth 3.x? Anyone here in the industry — is something in the pipeline?"

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