Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - We need a better Private Browsing Mode (networkworld.com)

Miche67 writes: Many browsers have some type of 'private' browsing. The settings aren't enough, though, to offer real protection.

As this writer says, Chrome's Incognito Mode "doesn't offer strong protection at all," and Firefox's Private Browsing with Tracking Protection — while stronger than Chrome — is an all-or-nothing option. "You can’t turn it off for sites you trust, but have it otherwise enabled by default."

Every single link to non-trusted websites should open, by default, in a Private/Incognito window. C'mon, browser makers, get this done.


Submission + - Is the WHO announcement a scam. (who.int)

niftymitch writes: Math...
According to the WHO, world wide about 34,000 cancer deaths per year worldwide are attributable to diets high in processed meat. With a population of seven billion one wonders what the WHO is classifying. Compare with fatalities per driver's licenses of 1 per 6,200 driver's licenses in 2009.
They do say: These numbers contrast with about 1 million cancer deaths per year globally due to tobacco smoking, 600 000 per year due to alcohol consumption, and more than 200 000 per year due to air pollution."

Staying home and enjoying a BLT might prove safer than driving out to a tofurkey restaurant.
I fully expect California to classify bacon as carcinogenic — they are the ones that are happy to tell us all that buying a second lottery ticket doubles your odds of winning. They fail to tell us that if we all buy a second the odds do not really double in ways implied. They also fail to tell a single purchaser that 2x a very very very very very very tiny number is still a very tiny number.
Next gets me started on the omission of health concerns related to the preservation of food.. Yes the are aware: "Processed meat refers to meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking, or other processes to enhance flavour or improve preservation."
Tell me what the increased fatality rate associated with loss of improved preservation is.
Possibly I am right and possibly I have discovered the roots of the cabal behind this scam.

Submission + - Security Vendor Snake Oil

snydeq writes: IT security expert Roger Grimes provides real-world tales of security vendor snake oil, spelling out seven promises and technologies touted by security companies that don't deliver. 'If you're a hardened IT security pro, you've probably had these tactics run by you over and over. It's never only one vendor touting unbelievable claims but many. It's like a pathology of the computer security industry, this all-too-frequent underhanded quackery used in the hopes of duping an IT organization into buying dubious claims or overhyped wares. Following are seven computer security claims or technologies that, when mentioned in the sales pitch, should get your snake-oil radar up and primed for false promises.'

Submission + - Schneier: The US government has betrayed the internet. We need to take it back. (theguardian.com) 2

wabrandsma writes: Quoting Bruce Schneier in the Guardian:

The NSA has undermined a fundamental social contract. We engineers built the internet – and now we have to fix it

Government and industry have betrayed the internet, and us. This is not the internet the world needs, or the internet its creators envisioned. We need to take it back. And by we, I mean the engineering community.

Yes, this is primarily a political problem, a policy matter that requires political intervention. But this is also an engineering problem, and there are several things engineers can – and should – do.

Submission + - Unclean at Any Speed 1

countach44 writes: From An article in IEEE's Spectrum magazine: 'Upon closer consideration, moving from petroleum-fueled vehicles to electric cars begins to look more and more like shifting from one brand of cigarettes to another. We wouldn’t expect doctors to endorse such a thing. Should environmentally minded people really revere electric cars?' The author discusses the controversy and social issues behind electric car research and demonstrates what many of us have been thinking: are electric cars really more envrionmentally friendly than those based on internal combustion engines?
News

Submission + - There Are 26 Nuclear Power Plants in Hurricane Sandy's Path (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "Hurricane Sandy is about to ruin a bunch of people’s Mondays. In New York City alone, the storm has already shut down public transportation, forced tens of thousands to relocate to higher ground and compelled even more office jockeys to work from home. (Okay, that last part might not be so bad, especially for the folks that don’t actually have to work at all.) But if it knocks out power to any of the 26 nuclear power plants that lie directly in its path, the frankenstorm of the century will ruin Tuesday, too. Heck, a nuclear meltdown would probably screw up the entire week."
Education

Submission + - Are teachers headed for obsolescence: OLPC children teach themselves (technologyreview.com)

dstates writes: One Laptop Per Child reports encouraging results of a bold experiment to reach the millions of students worldwide who have no access to primary school. OLPC delivered tablets to two Ethiopian villages in unmarked boxes without instructions or instructors. Within minutes the kids were opening the boxes and figuring out how to use the Motorola Zoom tablets, within days they were playing alphabet songs and withing a few months how to hack the user interface to enable blocked camera functionality. With the Kahn Academy and others at the high school level and massive open online courses at the college level, the teaching profession is under assault as never before.
Privacy

Submission + - Stallman on Unity: Canonical will have to hand over users' data to governments (benjaminkerensa.com)

Giorgio Maone writes: "Ubuntu developer and fellow mozillian Benjamin Kerensa chatted with various people about the new Amazon Product Results in the Ubuntu 12.10 Unity Dash. Among them, Richard Stallman told him that this feature is bad because: 1. "If Canonical gets this data, it will be forced to hand it over to various governments."; 2. Amazon is bad. Concerned people can disable remote data retrieval for any lens and scopes or, more surgically, use sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping."

Submission + - Does the iPad canniblize Macbook sales (computerworld.com) 1

djl4570 writes: CEO Tim Cook thinks so. I've spent some time playing with an iPad. It was interesting enough for me to test the waters with a Galaxy Tab. This submission originates from my Galaxy Tab docked in an external KB. I've been surfing casually for awhile now and the answer is no. Tablets will not replace laptops anytime soon. Far too many sites have tablet hostile controls. Even /. Places the UID icon right next to the logout button. Works if you're using a stylus but not so well with a fingertip. The clickable NWS maps are unpredictable using a tablet. Other sites such as Darkroastedblend.com have mobile sites optimized for the portrait format used by smartphones. The onscreen keyboard is awkward and slow to use but I have moderated and posted a comment or two using the on screen keyboard. I don't see tablets replacing laptops any time soon, but I do see them converging much the same way this tablet is docked to a keyboard looks like a small laptop.
China

Submission + - Travel Light to China 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "What may once have sounded like the behavior of a raving paranoid is now considered standard operating procedure for officials at American government agencies, research groups and companies as the NY Times reports how businesses sending representatives to China give them a loaner laptop and cellphone that they wipe clean before they leave and wipe again when they return. “If a company has significant intellectual property that the Chinese and Russians are interested in, and you go over there with mobile devices, your devices will get penetrated,” says Joel F. Brenner, formerly the top counterintelligence official in the office of the director of national intelligence. The scope of the problem is illustrated by an incident at the United States Chamber of Commerce in 2010 when the chamber learned that servers in China were stealing information from four of its Asia policy experts who frequently visited China. After their trips, even the office printer and a thermostat in one of the chamber's corporate offices were communicating with an internet address in China. The chamber did not disclose how hackers had infiltrated its systems, but its first step after the attack was to bar employees from taking devices with them “to certain countries,” notably China. "Everybody knows that if you are doing business in China, in the 21st century, you don’t bring anything with you," says Jacob Olcott, a cybersecurity expert at Good Harbor Consulting. "That’s ‘Business 101’ — at least it should be.”"
The Internet

Submission + - Harvard Business Review comes out against SOPA (hbr.org)

hype7 writes: "The Harvard Business Review has come out with an article extremely critical of SOPA. As opposed to a battle of "content" vs "technology", they are characterizing it as a battle of "giants" vs "innovators". From the article: "If you take a look at many of the largest backers of SOPA and PIPA — the Business of Software Alliance, Comcast, Electronic Arts, Ford, L'Oreal, Scholastic, Sony, Disney — you'll see that they represent a wide range of businesses. Some are technology companies, some are content companies, some are historic innovators, and some are not. But one characteristic is the same across all of SOPA's supporters — they all have an interest in preserving the status quo. If there is meaningful innovation by startups in content creation and delivery, the supporters of SOPA and PIPA are poised to lose.""
Programming

Submission + - Why We Need More Programming Languages (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Fatal Exception's Neil McAllister writes in favor of new programming languages given the difficulty of upgrading existing, popular languages. 'Whenever a new programming language is announced, a certain segment of the developer population always rolls its eyes and groans that we have quite enough to choose from already,' McAllister writes. 'But once a language reaches a certain tipping point of popularity, overhauling it to include support for new features, paradigms, and patterns is easier said than done.' PHP 6, Perl 6, Python 3, ECMAScript 4 — 'the lesson from all of these examples is clear: Programming languages move slowly, and the more popular a language is, the slower it moves. It is far, far easier to create a new language from whole cloth than it is to convince the existing user base of a popular language to accept radical changes.'"
Science

Submission + - GE to Turn World's Biggest Civilian Plutonium Stoc (gereports.com)

ambermichelle writes: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy has proposed to the U.K. government to build an advanced nuclear reactor that would consume the country’s stockpile of radioactive plutonium. The technology called PRISM, or Power Reactor Innovative Small Module, would use the plutonium to generate low-carbon electricity.

The U.K. has the world’s largest civilian stockpile of plutonium. The size of the stockpile is 87 tons and growing.

Nuclear reactors unlock energy by splitting atoms of the material stored in fuel rods. This process is called fission. For fission to be effective, neutrons – the nuclear particles that do the splitting and keep the reaction going – must maintain the right speed. Conventional reactors use water to cool and slow down neutrons, keeping fission effective. But water-cooled reactors leave some 95 percent of the fuel’s potential energy untapped.

Idle

Submission + - Mythbusters misses target, hits house with cannonb 1

linuxwrangler writes: A Mythbusters experiment went seriously wrong today when the team missed the intended target and fired a cannonball through a nearby home. After missing the target, the projectile took some "unfortunate bounces", ripped through the front door of and out the opposite wall of an East Dublin home waking the sleeping residents then bounced across a 4-lane road before smashing into a minivan that had just been parked.

Slashdot Top Deals

"If truth is beauty, how come no one has their hair done in the library?" -- Lily Tomlin

Working...