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OS X

Submission + - Emulated Mac OS X (csgraf.de)

Alexander Graf writes: "Have you ever been in the position of running Linux as main Operating System on your Intel Mac and you were in dire need of an OSX only program? This is no longer a problem, as I modified Qemu and KVM to run Mac OS X, so you can just boot Mac OS X in a virtual machine, just like you did with Windows anyway.
If you don't have a Mac though, don't despair. This works for non-Macs too.

@staff I don't think this is enough of a description. Please ask me something I can answer directly your readers would like to know and visit the project site, especially the FAQ section.
http://alex.csgraf.de/self/?qemu/"

Microsoft

Submission + - Office 2003SP3: Old file formats, now unavailable! 3

time961 writes: "In Service Pack 3 for Office 2003, Microsoft has disabled support for many older file formats, so if you have old Word, Excel, 1-2-3, Quattro, or Corel Draw documents, watch out! They did this because the old formats are "less secure", which actually makes some sense, but only if you got the files from some untrustworthy source.

Naturally, they did this by default, and then documented a mind-bogglingly complex workaround (KB 938810) rather than providing a user interface for adjusting it, or even a set of awkward "Do you really want to do this?" dialog boxes to click through. And, of course, because these are, after all, old file formats, many users will encounter the problem only months or years after the software change, while groping around in dusty and now-inaccessible archives.

One of the better aspects of Office is its extensive compatibility mechanisms for old file formats. At least the support isn't completely gone—it's just really hard to use. Security is important, but there are better ways to fulfill this goal.

This was also covered by the Windows Secrets newsletter, although I can't find a story URL for it."
Privacy

Submission + - Is Adobe spying on CS3 users? (uneasysilence.com) 2

henrypijames writes: For months, users of Adobe Creative Suite 3 have been wondering why some of the applications regularly connect to 192.168.112.2o7.net which looks a lot like a private IP address but is actually a public domain address belonging to the web analytics company Omniture. Now allegations of user spying are getting louder, prompting Adobe Photoshop product manager John Nack to respond, though many remain unsatisfied with his explanation.
Government

Submission + - Convincing the Military to Embrace Open Source (linuxinsider.com)

drewmoney writes: Misconceptions about open source software have made many U.S. Defense Department sectors reluctant to employ this technology. Although a 2003 department policy allows its use, many still believe that open source software poses an increased security risk to networks and that it is not supported as well as commercial products.
Media

Submission + - Writers Guild of America and the Open Source Model (guardian.co.uk)

stevedcc writes: "The Guardian is running an article about seven groups of writers creating their own ventures to deliver content over the internet, bypassing the movie studios. There is a mention of one particular project involving A-list talent that will be released in 50 or so daily segments. From the article:

"It's a whole new model to bring content directly to the masses," said screenwriter Aaron Mendelsohn. "We're gathering together a team of A-list TV and film writers, along with their A-list equivalent from Silicon Valley."
Are consumers finally going to see the internet used to distribute movie content in a sensible way?"

Wii

Submission + - Nintendo Wii Fully Hacked at 24C3, runs Homebrew (wiinintendo.net)

cHALiTO writes: "From the site:
The guys over at 24C3 just demoed a Wii hack that is set to provide native Wii homebrew in the near future (not running in GC mode, and with full access to all the Wii hardware!)
They were able to find encryption and decryption keys by doing full memory dumps at runtime over a custom serial interface. Using these keys, they were able to create a Wii 'game' that ran their own code (their demo happened to show live sensor/Wiimote information, amongst a few other things).
Read here and watch video here."

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