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Android

Submission + - First dual-booting tablet can run Linux/Android (pengpod.com)

garbagechuteflyboy writes: PengPod is the first dual-booting tablet; It's able to run both Linux and Android. Pengpod is now running the latest Plasma Active which gives this powerful Linux tablet features that were previously only available to iPad and Android tablets. PengPod is currently selling Pre-orders on Indiegogo.
PengPod hoping to ship inexpensive Linux tablets with 7, 10 inch displays liliputing
Android and Linux on a dual-booting tablet Ars Technica
Meet the PengPod, a 'true Linux' tablet starting at $120 PCWorld

China

Submission + - China's stealth fighter flight test successful (wsj.com)

vencs writes: China has successfully tested its second stealth fighter, a smaller, twin-engine jet that military analysts said could potentially allow it to one day fly missions from an aircraft carrier. Military analysts said the new jet's design suggested the People's Liberation Army might use it to arm and escort aircraft carriers like the Liaoning , which was officially deployed last month. Andrei Chang, editor-in-chief of Kanwa Asian Defense Monthly, said the new prototype appears to have borrowed features from the US Air Force's twin-engine F-22 and US Navy's single-engine F-35C.
Encryption

Submission + - Four years later, most U.S. Drones still Openly Broadcast Secret Video Feeds (coinurl.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Four years after discovering that militants were tapping into drone video feeds, the U.S. military still hasn’t secured the transmissions of more than half of its fleet of Predator and Reaper drones, Danger Room has learned. The majority of the aircraft still broadcast their classified video streams “in the clear” — without encryption. With a minimal amount of equipment and know-how, militants can see what America’s drones see.
Science

Submission + - Thousands of Lab Mice Lost in Sandy Flooding (slate.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: While New York University's Langone Medical Center in lower Manhattan was the site of heroism as 260 patients
were evacuated from flooded floors and nearly complete loss of power, similar floods at NYU's nearby Smilow Research Building killed thousands of laboratory mice, including genetically altered specimens in-bred over many generations as research subjects for melanoma and other diseases. Other laboratory animals, cells, and living tissue used in medical research were also lost; because of the gestation period involved, some projects were likely set back a number of years. Past experience with storms such as Allison in Houston and Katrina in New Orleans has shown that keeping laboratory animals in basements is not good practice, but research institutions keep doing it anyway.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook tries cloaking probe into data leak involving 1 million accounts (arstechnica.com)

concealment writes: "Risk Assessment / Security & Hacktivism
Facebook tries cloaking probe into data leak involving 1 million accounts
Blogger who bought e-mail addresses for $5 told to keep discussions private.

by Dan Goodin — Oct 29 2012, 1:12pm CDT

        Privacy
        The Web

0

Facebook officials told a blogger to keep their discussions with him private as they investigate claims he acquired names and e-mail addresses belonging almost one million account holders for $5 through a publicly available service online.

"Oh and by the way, you are not allowed to disclose any part of this conversation," member's of Facebook's platform policy team said during a tape-recorded telephone conversation, according to a blog post published by Bogomil Shopov, who describes himself as a "community and technology geek" who lives in Prague, Czech Republic. "It is a secret that we are even having this conversation."

Shopov said Facebook officials set up the conversation after an earlier blog post claiming he purchased data for one million Facebook users online for just $5. The blogger said it was impossible for him to determine exactly how recent the data was, although several of the entries he checked contained accurate e-mail addresses for people he knew. In addition to containing names and e-mail addresses, the cache he purchased also contained profile IDs. In an e-mail to Ars, Shopov said he suspects the data came from a third-party developer."

Government

Submission + - UK Petition Calls for 4G Licence Money To Go On Science And Tech (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "British celebrities in science and technology, including Brian Cox and Ben Goldacre are leading a petition calling for the proceeds of the 4G licence auction to go on science and technology. The auction, which is going ahead after years of delay, could raise billions — the petition says this money should be invested in ways to boos Britain's tech-based industry."

Submission + - The most detailed images of Uranus' atmosphere ever

monkeyhybrid writes: The Planetary Society's Emily Lakdawalla reports on the most detailed images of Uranus ever taken. The infrared sensitivity of the ground based Keck II telescope's NIRC2 instrument enabled astronomers to see below the high level methane based atmosphere that has hampered previous observations, and with unprecedented clarity. If you ever thought Uranus was a dull blue looking sphere then look again; you could easily mistake these images for being of Jupiter!
Google

Submission + - 17th century microscope book is now freely readable (downloadtheuniverse.com) 2

menno_h writes: In January 1665, Samuel Pepys wrote in his diary that he stayed up till two in the morning reading a best-selling page-turner, a work that he called "the most ingenious book I read in my life." It was not a rousing history of English battles or a proto-bodice ripper. It was filled with images: of fleas, of bark, of the edges of razors.

The book was called Micrographia. It provided the reading public with its first look at the world beyond the naked eye. Its author, Robert Hooke, belonged to a brilliant circle of natural philosophers who--among many other things--were the first in England to make serious use of microscopes as scientific instruments. They were great believers in looking at the natural world for themselves rather than relying on what ancient Greek scholars had claimed. Looking under a microscope at the thousands of facets on an insect's compound eye, they saw things at the nanoscale that Aristotle could not have dreamed of. A razor's edge became a mountain range. In the chambers of a piece of bark, Hooke saw the first evidence of cells.
Micrographia is is available on Google Books now.

Moon

Submission + - A Supercomputer on the Moon to Direct Deep Space Traffic 1

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "NASA currently controls its deep space missions through a network of 13 giant antennas in California, Spain and Australia known as the Deep Space Network (DSN) but the network is obsolete and just not up to the job of transmitting the growing workload of extra-terrestrial data from deep space missions. That's why Ouliang Chang has proposed building a massive supercomputer in a deep dark crater on the side of the moon facing away from Earth and all of its electromagnetic chatter. Nuclear-powered, it would accept signals from space, store them, process them if needed and then relay the data back to Earth as time and bandwidth allows. The supercomputer would run in frigid regions near one of the moon’s poles where cold temperatures would make cooling the supercomputer easier, and would communicate with spaceships and earth using a system of inflatable, steerable antennas that would hang suspended over moon craters, giving the Deep Space Network a second focal point away from earth. As well as boosting humanity's space-borne communication abilities, Chang's presentation at a space conference (PDF) in Pasadena, California also suggests that the moon-based dishes could work in unison with those on Earth to perform very-long-baseline interferometry, which allows multiple telescopes to be combined to emulate one huge telescope. Best of all the project has the potential to excite the imagination of future spacegoers and get men back on the moon."

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