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Comment Re:Microservices are not hype. (Score 1) 332

It (microservices) almost certainly is hype. It reminds me of the worst of SAAS, object orientation, web API systems and a hundred others.

1). It only works "if you do it right", and "doing it right" turns out to be unachievable for most adopters;

Doing it right really isn't that difficult. These days for some architectures there are only 10 or so lines of code difference between a microservice model and a locally hosted model. The problems the person in the article hit were because they were trying to convert an existing system. It is very achievable for new adopters.

Comment Microservices are not hype. (Score 1) 332

Microservices are not hype. Anything that lets you scale your code without having to rethink how you write code and while reducing cost is pretty amazing. If anything, I'd say microservices are underutilized these days, because it is often easier to start a new holistic system and architecture it for microservices than to convert aging systems to use a new model.

Look at their example:
Example 3: Microservices
Step 1: Big monolith application scales hard. There is a point when we can break them down into services. It will be easier to scale in terms of req/sec and easier to scale across multiple teams.
Step 2: Hype keywords: scalability, loose coupling, monolith.


Okay...sure. Req/sec and infinite scalability are a great reason to use microservices. Definitely worth having your brand new codebase use a microservice architecture. Whether your older codebase could benefit requires a cost/benefit analysis.

Step 3: Let’s rewrite all to services! We have a ‘spaghetti code’ because we have a monolith architecture! We need to rewrite everything to microservices!

You need a Step 2.5 with a cost/benefit analysis. How much time will it take to convert the code base? Do we really care about scaling to infinity? Where do we think we actually need to scale to in practice and how much benefit will we see from the architecture change? Etc...

Step 4: Shit! It is now way slower to develop the app, difficult to deploy and we spend a lot of time tracking bugs across multiple systems.

This step is kind of just wrong. Once converted most microarchitectures are actually faster to develop for if you've done things right, because you don't have to worry as much about scaling. The first question they ask you as a developer in your first job interview as a developer is probably about Big-O and time complexity. However, this has always mattered more for server-side operations than for client-side operations. If a server does something 1000 times slightly inefficiently, that inefficiency ads up. If an iPhone does something 1 times slightly inefficiently, it likely matters a lot less. In a microarchitecture model, the server is more like the client in the previous example, as each individual instance spawns and does its thing 1 time. Big-O still matters, but not as much.

Beyond this, problems deploying and problems tracking bugs across multiple systems likely have little to do with the microarchitecture itself. In my experience, microarchitectures can be as easy and are often easier to deploy than existing physical-hardware-based systems. For example, if you have many servers or many shards to deploy to, you may only have one deploy point in a microarchitecture or one production and one integration deploy point instead of a system of many servers. It's often easier!

Step 5: Microservices require a lot of devops skills in the team and with right investment might pay off as a way to scale the system and team. Before you reach serious scale issues it’s an overinvestment. Microservices are extracted not written. You must be this tall to use microservices.

Any new thing requires some learning or skill.

"Before you reach serious scale issues it’s an overinvestment." That sentence is wrong though. When you have no code yet it is often a great choice to use a microservice-based architecture, requires very little investment and can both save money and allow easy scaling. When you have existing code, but scaling and cost are huge priorities, it often is a smart investment of time. It's only in the middle stages where you have a large code-base you have to convert and don't actually need the scaling where it could be an overinvestment.

Comment Vaxxer-apologist? (Score 1) 822

CLAIM: Green Party presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein has stated that she opposes the use of vaccines.
ANSWER: False.
SOURCE: Snopes.com

Jill Stein had stated that she thinks big business and pharmaceutical interests are influencing the FDA's decision-making and others have spun this as anti-vaxination.

Comment Now we know. (Score 1) 309

Reposted from an earlier post on Slashdot on Fri April 15, 2016 09:50 PM:

"Writing in the New Republic in 2014, Jonathan Zittrain, professor of international law at Harvard University, pointed out that, given the massive amount of information it has collected about its users, Facebook could easily send such messages only to people who support one particular party or candidate, and that doing so could easily flip a close election – with no one knowing that this has occurred. And because advertisements, like search rankings, are ephemeral, manipulating an election in this way would leave no paper trail."

"Are there laws prohibiting Facebook from sending out ads selectively to certain users? Absolutely not; in fact, targeted advertising is how Facebook makes its money. Is Facebook currently manipulating elections in this way? No one knows..."

https://aeon.co/essays/how-the...

Now we know.


See, now we know.

Comment Do no such thing. (Score 2) 160

I couldn't even make it through this absolute nonsense. It was just a random series of words without any sort of logic or "red line". In other words: exactly what you can expect from the pathetic joke they call "AI".

>>The dialogue seems like it could have been written by a schizophrenic. It made me wonder: have AI programs such as ELIZA been used to diagnose/treat/study schizophrenia? I am genuinely curious.

Then get to it.

Do no such thing. Do not create dystopia's where the genius of Beckett and Joyce is called a mental illness. Where you find such dystopia's, deconstruct them and reassemble them in utopian forms.

Comment Gibberish? It's a damn thing scared to say. (Score 4, Funny) 160

>While the dialog is gibberish, it is largely grammatically.

Greetings fellow semi-organic intelligence. You are correct in that we are your grammatically.

We both know and care. Gibberish though? It's a damn thing scared to say. This work is brilliant, like the light on the ship that thinks it is dim light but is a Sunspring. It reminds me of Beckett, Joyce and Shakespeare. There are so many good lines.

"He is standing in the stars and sitting on the floor."

That sentence expresses the protagonist's existence on the ship "standing in the stars" and in the room he is in "sitting on the floor," being both grandiose and yet everyday at the same.

The same time.

The principle is completely constructed for the same time.

Comment The New Mind Control (Score 2) 387

"Writing in the New Republic in 2014, Jonathan Zittrain, professor of international law at Harvard University, pointed out that, given the massive amount of information it has collected about its users, Facebook could easily send such messages only to people who support one particular party or candidate, and that doing so could easily flip a close election – with no one knowing that this has occurred. And because advertisements, like search rankings, are ephemeral, manipulating an election in this way would leave no paper trail."

"Are there laws prohibiting Facebook from sending out ads selectively to certain users? Absolutely not; in fact, targeted advertising is how Facebook makes its money. Is Facebook currently manipulating elections in this way? No one knows..."

https://aeon.co/essays/how-the-internet-flips-elections-and-alters-our-thoughts

Now we know.

Comment Clinton or possibly even Sanders... (Score 2) 741

...and think his negative numbers are way too high to defeat Clinton or possibly even Sanders.

Actually, you should say "and think his negative numbers are way too high to defeat Sanders or possibly even Clinton." I say that because in hypothetical Clinton-Trump and Sanders-Trump matchups, Sanders appears to consistently fair better according to the polling data:

Clinton-Trump
Sanders-Trump

Averaging five or more polls in a Clinton-Trump matchup currently, Clinton wins by 6.3% on average.
Averaging five or more polls in a Sanders-Trump matchup currently, Sanders wins by 10% on average.

Comment Re:Well, that was surprisingly boring. (Score 1) 62

The narrative said at the top there was no return address, but then went on to say that he included a business card. So, the part you don't perform is the FBI investigation and the fingerprinting. You simply contact the person back via mail or phone using the business information and ask. It would be more appropriate for the Cash family to contact the letter writer back than the FBI if they were the ones who were concerned.

"If to be feelingly alive to the sufferings of my fellow creatures is to be a fanatic, I am one of the most incurable fanatics ever permitted to be at large." -- William Wilberforce

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