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Submission + - Why you shouldn't worry about IPv6 just yet ( 1

nk497 writes: While it's definitely time to start thinking about IPv6, it's not time for most to move up to it, argues Steve Cassidy, saying most can turn it off in Windows 7 without causing any trouble. Many network experts argue we're nearing network armageddon, but they've been saying that for years."This all started when Tony Blair was elected. The first time. Yep, thatâ's how long IPv6 has been around, and it’s quite a few weeks ago now." He says smart engineering has avoided many of the problems. "Is there an IPv6 “killer app” yet for smaller networks? No. Is there any reason based on security or ease of management – unless you’re running a 100,000-seat network or a national-level ISP – for you to move up to it? No. Should you start to do a bit of reading about it? That’s about the stage we’re truly at, and the answer to that one is: yes," he says.

Submission + - SPAM: The Hidden Costs Behind the Big 3's Coolest Device

retrovertigo76 writes: Microsoft, Nintendo, and Sony all showed off some really cool technology coming out through the next year. However, how much is this new technology going to actually cost you? GoozerNation is here to break down some of the details of what you might really be required to pay... to play.
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The Internet

Submission + - SPAM: DNSSEC comes to rescue of .org domains

alphadogg writes: On Wednesday, .org became the first generic top-level domain to offer its customers improved security using DNSSEC (Domain Name System Security Extensions).

The most important task of DNS is translating IP addresses to host names. But when DNS was born in the early days of the Internet it was designed to scale up fast, and a trade-off was made between that and security, according to Alexa Raad, CEO at .org. The implementation of DNSSEC will help change that and protect users against man-in-the middle attacks, she said.

For users, this means they can be sure that the site they are visiting is actually run by, for example, their bank, and not a hacker, as long as they go to the correct URL. For the rollout of DNSSEC to take off, registrars, to which domains turn when they want to implement the technology, will have to be on board. Today, 13 of .org's registrars can handle DNSSEC, according to its Web site. That Go Daddy, the worlds largest registrar, is one of them, will help create a domino effect and get more registrants to implement DNSSEC, according to Raad.

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Submission + - Lack of Standards Holds Back Green Tech

goG writes: As the consumer electronics industry becomes more environmentally conscious, confusion and a lack of unified standards has held the public back from widespread adoption of green technologies. Many consumer electronics companies claim their products to be "green," but how much they can actually save on energy bills is debatable. Unfortunately, monitoring energy usage can often be just as confusing.

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