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Submission + - Hacking Group Linked to Chinese Army Caught Attacking Dummy Water Plant (technologyreview.com) 4

holy_calamity writes: MIT Technology Review reports that APT1, the China-based hacking group said to steal data from U.S. companies, has been caught taking over a decoy water plant control system. The honeypot mimicked the remote access control panels and physical control system of a U.S. municipal water plant. The decoy was one of 12 set up in 8 countries around the world, which together attracted more than 70 attacks, 10 of which completely compromised the control system. China and Russia were the leading sources of the attacks. The researcher behind the study says his results provide the first clear evidence that people actively seek to exploit the many security problems of industrial systems.

Submission + - White Hat luxury car hacker to speak at USENIX security event despite injunction (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: The lead author of a controversial research paper about flaws in luxury car lock systems will deliver a presentation at this month’s USENIX Security Symposium even though a UK court ruling (inspired by a Volkswagen complaint) has forced the paper to be pulled from the event’s proceedings. USENIX has announced that in “in keeping with its commitment to academic freedom and open access to research,” researcher Roel Verdult will speak at the Aug. 14-16 conference, to be held in Washington, D.C. Verdult and 2 co-authors were recently prohibited by the High Court of Justice in the U.K. from publishing certain portions of their paper, “Dismantling Megamos Crypto: Wireless Lockpicking a Vehicle Immobilizer.” Among the most sensitive information: Codes for cracking the car security system in Porsches, Audis, etc.
Crime

Submission + - Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases (washingtonpost.com)

NotSanguine writes: From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.


Cloud

Submission + - City Brought To Its Knees By Datacenter Outage

An anonymous reader writes: On July 11th in Calgary, Canada, a fire and explosion was reported at the Shaw Communications headquarters. This took down a large swath of IT infrastructure, including Shaw's telephone and Internet customers, local radio stations, emergency 911 services, provincial services such Alberta Health Services computers, and Alberta Registries. One news site reports that "The building was designed with network backups, but the explosion damaged those systems as well.". No doubt this has been a hard lesson on how NOT to host critical public services.
Idle

Submission + - Rolls-Royce Unveils World's First LEGO Jet Engine Made from 152,455 Bricks (inhabitat.com)

Elliot Chang writes: "Rolls-Royce debuted the world’s first ever LEGO Jet Engine at the Farnborough International Airshow this week in England. The model is a half-size replica of the enormous Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 that powers the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. It took 152,455 LEGO bricks, eight weeks, and a team of four fulltime employees to assemble the model. While the real engine weighs in at 1.25 tons, the LEGO replica still weighs a hefty 676 pounds and measures 4.9 feet long and 6.5 feet wide."
Earth

Submission + - Mysterious Sprite Photographed by ISS Astronaut (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "A very rare and beautiful view of a red sprite has been photographed by Expedition 31 astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) hovering just above a bright flash of lightning in a thunderstorm over Myanmar. First documented in a photo in 1989, red sprites are very brief flashes of optical activity that are associated with powerful lightning discharges in storms — although the exact mechanisms that create them aren't yet known. But the orbiting outpost seems like the perfect vantage point to learn more about them!"
Patents

Submission + - Nokia sues HTC, RIM and Viewsonic (techworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "Nokia has filed claims in the U.S. and Germany saying that products from HTC, Research In Motion (RIM) and ViewSonic infringe a number of the company's patents. Nokia has filed actions against all three companies in Mannheim's and Munich's respective regional courts. Nokia has also filed complaints against HTC before the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC), the Federal District Court of Delaware and the regional court in Düsseldorf. RIM will also have to dispatch its lawyers to Düsseldorf for a Nokia lawsuit filed there, while ViewSonic's legal team have to defend the company against a suit in Delaware."

Submission + - Jack Tramiel, founder of Commodore Business Machines, dies at age 83 (forbes.com)

LoTonah writes: Jack Tramiel, the founder of Commodore Business Machines and later, the owner of Atari, died Easter Sunday. He was 83. He undoubtedly changed the computing landscape by bringing low cost computers to millions of people, and he started a price war that saw dozens of large companies leave the market. He also took a bankrupt Atari and managed to wring almost another decade out of it. The 6502 microprocessor would have withered on the vine if it weren't for Tramiel's support. Could anyone else have done all of that?
Politics

Submission + - How one man escaped from a North Korean prison camp (guardian.co.uk) 2

TheNextCorner writes: "Incredible to read this sad story:

"There was torture, starvation, betrayals and executions, but to Shin In Geun, Camp 14 – a prison for the political enemies of North Korea – was home. Then one day came the chance to flee

His first memory is an execution. Shin In Geun was four years old, too young to understand the speech that came before that killing.... ...The teacher ordered the girl to the front of the class and told her to kneel. Swinging his wooden pointer, he struck her on the head again and again. As Shin and his classmates watched in silence, lumps puffed up on her skull, blood leaked from her nose and she toppled over on to the concrete floor. Shin and his classmates carried her home. Later that night, she died...."

Games

Submission + - Elder Scrolls MMO to be revealed soon by Bethesda (tech-stew.com)

techfun89 writes: Move over Knights of the Old Republic, we may have a new player in town. For some time its been rumored that an Elder Scrolls MMO will be coming, with news of it soon, possibly in May. Sources claim that Bethesda is working on the MMO project and this project will be a big feature of E3 this June.

The Elder Scrolls MMO will apparently take place hundreds of years, if not 1000 years, before Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim.

Politics

Submission + - 8200+ Strong, Researchers Demand Journals To Open Access (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: "Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it freewell, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research."
Android

Submission + - Free Apps Eat Your Smartphone Battery (techweekeurope.co.uk) 1

judgecorp writes: "Here's a reason to pay for smartphone apps. The free versions can spend three times as much energy finding and serving ads as they do on their actual job. Research from a Purdue university scientist found that as much as 75 percent of the energy used by free apps goes on accessing location services, finding suitable adverts and displaying them."
User Journal

Journal Journal: Slashdot Replatforming Complete 26

As of 3:26 PM EST on Wednesday February 1st 2012, Slashdot is now running completely on its new platform!
There were a few rough and long days in the last week completing the final capacity testing and roll out procedure, but it is now complete, and (*knocks on wood*) running smoothly. I owe many thanks to my team of engineers and the site operations team for all their help and support. The Editors here at Slashdot also deserve thanks for their help in testing, and their patience with me as

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