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Submission + - SPAM: Attempts to Frame Assange as a Pedophile and Russian spy 1

Okian Warrior writes: Earlier today the website DailyKos reported on a smear campaign plot to falsely accuse Julian Assange of pedophilia. An unknown entity posing as an internet dating agency prepared an elaborate plot to falsely claim that Julian Assange received US$1M from the Russian government and a second plot to frame him sexually molesting an eight year old girl.

Here is the description of the plot from Mr Assange’s legal team.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Samsung SSD 960 Pro NVMe SSD Launched, Fastest Consumer SSD In Benchmarks (

MojoKid writes: Samsung announced its latest, consumer-class NVMe M.2 based SSD 960 Pro solid state drive a few weeks back but today marks the official launch of the product. Samsung's new drive is an absolute beast with peak transfer speeds in the 3.5GB/s range and ultra-high endurance ratings too. The Samsung SSD 960 PRO NVMe M.2 series tested here will be offered in three capacities: 512GB, 1TB, and a beefy 2TB. All of the drives have the same M.2 (2280) "gumstick" form factor and offer peak read bandwidth of 3.5GB/s with 2.1GB/s writes, while their max IOPS ratings vary at higher queue depths, as do endurance ratings, which start at 400TBW (Terabytes Written) and scale to 1200TBW for the 2TB drive. At about $.63 — $.65 per GiB, they aren't the cheapest NVMe drives on the market (the 512GB drive drops in at $329) but the new SSD 960 Pro is definitely the fastest consumer SSD currently as benchmark testing clearly proves out.

Submission + - Quantum Research Achieves 10-Fold Boost In Superposition Stability

An anonymous reader writes: A team of Australian researchers has developed a qubit offering ten times the stability of existing technologies. The computer scientists claim that the new innovation could significantly increase the reliability of quantum computing calculations. The new technology, developed at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), has been named a ‘dressed’ quantum bit as it combines a single atom with an electromagnetic field. This process allows the qubit to remain in a superposition state for ten times longer than has previously been achieved. The researchers argue that this extra time in superposition could boost the performance stability of quantum computing calculations. Previously fragile and short-lived, retaining a state of superposition has been one of the major barriers to the development of quantum computing. The ability to remain in two states simultaneously is the key to scaling and strengthening the technology further.

Submission + - Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 at Walmart (

An anonymous reader writes: One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price — they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.

Submission + - Wikileaks precommits mean a big drop is coming, not that Assange is dead. (

argStyopa writes: Wikileaks has issued 3 precommits, which are crypto 'signatures' meant to confirm later data is genuine. This is likely tied to their post:
"Julian Assange's internet link has been intentionally severed by a state party. We have activated the appropriate contingency plans."
It should be taken as implied that either these precommits are in advance of an important dump, or simply as a preventative against more state-level attacks on their releases.

Submission + - FTC Shuts Down $9 Million Phone Fraud Ring

Trailrunner7 writes: The FTC has shut down a phone fraud scam that involved scammers calling consumers–mostly elderly and on fixed incomes–and pressuring them to invest in web sites that supposedly had ties to large companies, promising quick returns. The scheme allegedly netted the scammers more than $9 million.

The scheme involved six companies that the FTC alleges were owned and operated by three defendants, Susan Rodriguez, Matthew Rodriguez and William Whitley. The commission alleges that the defendants would call consumers unsolicited and try to convince them to hand over money for an investment in e-commerce sites that supposedly had links to large, legitimate sites such as Amazon.

“The details of the offer differ, but Defendants routinely describe it as an offer to purchase or invest in e-commerce websites, or websites that direct traffic to e-commerce websites such as Defendants’ telemarketers typically promise consumers that they will earn money based on sales at the e-commerce websites and/or traffic through their websites to the e-commerce websites. Defendants promise consumers substantial returns or income, such as hundreds or thousands of dollars every quarter,” the FTC complaint says.

Submission + - Backdoor Found in Foxconn Android Firmware (

msm1267 writes: A leftover factory debugger in Android firmware made by Taiwanese electronics manufacturer Foxconn can be flipped into a backdoor by an attacker with physical access to a device.

The situation is a dream for law enforcement or a forensics outfit wishing to gain root access to a targeted device. Android researcher Jon Sawyer on Wednesday publicly disclosed the situation, which he’s called Pork Explosion as a swipe at what he calls overhyped and branded vulnerabilities.

“As a physical threat, it’s bad; game over,” Sawyer said. “It’s easy to do and you get complete code execution on the device, even if it’s encrypted or locked down. It’s exactly what a forensics company or law enforcement officials would love to have.”

The backdoor was found in a bootloader built by Foxconn, Sawyer said. Foxconn builds phones and some low level software for firmware. Two vendors’ devices have been impacted so far—InFocus’ M810 and Nextbit’s Robin phones—but Sawyer cautioned that there are likely more.

Submission + - University of Quebec finds "signals probably from Extraterrestrial Intelligence"

An anonymous reader writes: A recent submission the Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific titled, "Discovery of peculiar periodic spectral modulations in a small fraction of solar type stars" places considerable weight on the ETI hypothesis as an explanation for observed modulation around a small percentage of sun-like stars. The paper has been accepted for publication and the full pdf is available here:

SETI has commented on it in an October 11 Press release ( and cautions jumping to conclusions:
"The one in 10,000 objects with unusual spectra seen by Borra and Trottier are certainly worthy of additional
study. However, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. It is too early to unequivocally attribute
these purported signals to the activities of extraterrestrial civilizations. Internationally agreed-upon protocols
for searches for evidence of advanced life beyond Earth (SETI) require candidates to be confirmed by
independent groups using their own telescopes, and for all natural explanations to be exhausted before
invoking extraterrestrial agents as an explanation. Careful work must be undertaken to determine false
positive rates, to rule out natural and instrumental explanations, and most importantly, to confirm detections
using two or more independent telescopes."

Submission + - System76 updates its affordable Ubuntu Linux 'Lemur' laptop with Intel Kaby Lake (

An anonymous reader writes: Today, System76 updates the aforementioned Lemur with Kaby Lake processors. While Dell's XPS 13 starts at $949, the Lemur begins at a much more reasonable $649.

That starting price gets you a solid machine. It has a Core i3-7100U processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB HDD. If you want more power, storage, or memory, you can configure to your hearts content. Not everyone needs the most hardcore specifications and unlike Dell's machine, the Lemur will better meet the needs of those on a budget.

Submission + - Attack Group Sets Traps in Crypto Downloads (

msm1267 writes: An attack group known as StrongPity has used watering hole attacks to redirect users to Trojanized versions of popular encryption software TrueCrypt and WinRAR.

Victims were located primarily in Belgium in Italy, as well as North Africa and the Middle East. The attackers posted redirects on legitimate download sites redirecting users to sites hosting malicious versions of the encryption tools.

The goal of the attackers was to compromise systems and drop additional malware that intercepts communication bound for Filezilla, Putty, Winscp and Windows RDP tools before the data is encrypted. Researchers at Kaspersky Lab published a report on the group's activities, which peaked during the sumemr.

Submission + - Sen. Wyden, EFF Say Yahoo Email Order Must Be Released

Trailrunner7 writes: The secret order the Department of Justice served on Yahoo last year to get the company to scan incoming emails for specific terms should be declassified and made public under the terms of the USA Freedom Act, experts say.

Sometime in the early part of 2015, the Justice Department reportedly went to Yahoo officials with an order to search its users’ incoming email messages for certain words. Yahoo complied by building a custom piece of software that sat in the mail system and looked for the terms, which haven’t been made public. The revelations about the mail scanning program last week caused an uproar among security experts and civil liberties groups.

Now, experts at the EFF and Sen. Ron Wyden say that the order served on Yahoo should be made public according to the text of a law passed last year. The USA Freedom Act is meant to declassify certain kinds of government orders, and the EFF says the Yahoo order fits neatly into the terms of the law.

“If the reports about the Yahoo order are accurate – including requiring the company to custom build new software to accomplish the scanning – it’s hard to imagine a better candidate for declassification and disclosure under Section 402," Aaron Mackey of the EFF said.

Submission + - "Dilbert" creator, Scott Adams, endorses Gary Johnson for President ( 1

SonicSpike writes: Scott Adams, creator of the popular comic, Dilbert, has decided to endorse Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson for President.

He writes at his blog:

"I don’t know how to write this post without unintentionally disrespecting the real victims of abuse in any form. I apologize in advance if it comes off that way. But it’s part of the national conversation now, and unavoidable. The best I can do is focus on how voters perceive the situation. I don’t have an opinion about who did what to whom because I wasn’t in the room any of those times. That said

We fine citizens of the United States find ourselves playing some sort of sex abuse poker in which we have to assign value to various alleged sex crimes to see which alleged rapist/groper/enabler combination we want to inhabit the White House and represent our national brand. Let’s call that situation “not ideal.”

My view is that if either Clinton or Trump can be judged by the weight of the allegations against them, both are 100% unfit for the office. I think Trump supporters think it’s worth the hit to our national brand just to get some specific improvements in the country.

Clinton supporters have been telling me for a few days that any visible support for Trump makes you a supporter of sex abuse. From a persuasion standpoint, that actually makes sense. If people see it that way, that’s the reality you have to deal with. I choose to not be part of that reality so I moved my endorsement to Gary Johnson.

I encourage all Clinton supporters to do the same, and for the same reason. I don’t know if any of the allegations against the Clinton’s are true, but since we are judging each other on associations, you don’t want to be seen as supporting sex abuse by putting an alleged duo of abusers (the perp and the clean-up crew) into office. I think you will agree that it doesn’t matter if any of the allegations are true, because the stink from a mountain of allegations – many that seem credible to observers – is bad for the national brand too. To even consider putting the Clinton’s back in the White House is an insult to women and every survivor of abuse.

To be fair, Gary Johnson is a pot head who didn’t know what Allepo was. I call that relatable. A President Johnson administration might bring with it some operational risks, and policy risks, but at least he won’t slime you by association and turn you into some sort of cheerleader for sex abuse in the way you would if you voted for the Clintons or Trump.

If you take allegations of sex abuse seriously – and you should – vote Johnson. To vote for Clinton or Trump is to be seen by others as an enabler for sexual abuse. I don’t think that’s what anyone had in mind by breaking the glass ceiling. Don’t let it happen to you."

Submission + - Hacker-Proof Code Confirmed (

An anonymous reader writes: In the summer of 2015 a team of hackers attempted to take control of an unmanned military helicopter known as Little Bird. The helicopter, which is similar to the piloted version long-favored for U.S. special operations missions, was stationed at a Boeing facility in Arizona. The hackers had a head start: At the time they began the operation, they already had access to one part of the drone’s computer system. From there, all they needed to do was hack into Little Bird’s onboard flight-control computer, and the drone was theirs.

When the project started, a “Red Team” of hackers could have taken over the helicopter almost as easily as it could break into your home Wi-Fi. But in the intervening months, engineers from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) had implemented a new kind of security mechanism — a software system that couldn’t be commandeered. Key parts of Little Bird’s computer system were unhackable with existing technology, its code as trustworthy as a mathematical proof. Even though the Red Team was given six weeks with the drone and more access to its computing network than genuine bad actors could ever expect to attain, they failed to crack Little Bird’s defenses.

“They were not able to break out and disrupt the operation in any way,” said Kathleen Fisher, a professor of computer science at Tufts University and the founding program manager of the High-Assurance Cyber Military Systems (HACMS) project. “That result made all of DARPA stand up and say, oh my goodness, we can actually use this technology in systems we care about.”...

Submission + - Comcast Rolls Out Nationwide 1TB Data Cap (

An anonymous reader writes: Comcast's home internet data caps are going live for a majority of customers starting November 1st, the company announced today. Called the "Xfinity Terabyte Internet Data Usage Plan," the cap restricts the amount of data you consume in your home to 1TB per month regardless of the speed of your plan. Comcast claims 99 percent of customers use less than 1TB per month, but it does now offer an unlimited option for $50 more per month. Back in April, Comcast bumped its data cap from 300GB to 1TB after consumer backlash and renewed regulatory concern from the FCC. And until today, the plan has been active in select markets for 16 states. But starting November 1st, the list will add 18 new markets, bringing the total number of states with the terabyte data cap to around 30. Notable exceptions include New York and nearly the entire northeast. For a full list of included markets, check Comcast's online FAQ.

Submission + - Researcher find D-Link DWR-932 router is "chock full of holes"

JustAnotherOldGuy writes: Security researcher Pierre Kim has unearthed a bucketload of vulnerabilities in the LTE router/portable wireless hotspot D-Link DWR-932. Kim found the latest available firmware has these vulnerabilities:

- Two backdoor accounts with easy-to-guess passwords that can be used to bypass the HTTP authentication used to manage the router
- A default, hardcoded Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS) PIN, as well as a weak WPS PIN generation algorithm
- Multiple vulnerabilities in the HTTP daemon
- Hardcoded remote Firmware Over The Air credentials
- Lowered security in Universal Plug and Play, and more.

“At best, the vulnerabilites are due to incompetence; at worst, it is a deliberate act of security sabotage from the vendor,” says Kim, and advises users to stop using the device until adequate fixes are provided.

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