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Submission + - Enumerating Android installed applications without special permissions (wroot.org)

An anonymous reader writes: It seems like it's nothing serious but actually any app can list the other installed apps on your Android system without user consent — and it's by design.

While analyzing traffic for an Android app, we figured out that the app was sending competitor data back home, dug up a little and found some interesting design flaw on the Android platform that enforces no special permissions on retreiving installed applications list.

Submission + - National Security Draft for Fining Tech Company "Noncompliance" on Wiretapping

Jeremiah Cornelius writes: A government task force is preparing legislation that would pressure companies such as Facebook and Google to enable law enforcement officials to intercept online communications as they occur. "The importance to us is pretty clear," says Andrew Weissmann, the FBI’s general counsel. "We don’t have the ability to go to court and say, 'We need a court order to effectuate the intercept.' Other countries have that." Under the draft proposal, a court could levy a series of escalating fines, starting at tens of thousands of dollars, on firms that fail to comply with wiretap orders, according to persons who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations. "This proposal is a non-starter that would drive innovators overseas and cost American jobs," said Greg Nojeim, a senior counsel at the Center for Democracy and Technology. "They might as well call it the Cyber Insecurity and Anti-Employment Act."

Submission + - Older Is Wiser: Study Shows Older Software Developers Still Learn New Tricks (ncsu.edu)

An anonymous reader writes: There's a persistent bias against older programmers in the software development industry, but do the claims against older developers' hold up? A new paper looks at reputation on StackOverflow, and finds that reputation grows as developers get older (adjusting time-on-StackOverflow), that older developers know about a wider variety of technologies, and older and younger developers seem to be equally knowledgable about most recent programming technologies. Two exceptions: older developers have the edge when it comes to iOS and Windows Phone.
Intel

Submission + - Apple and Intel discussing partnership regarding A-series processor production (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple has for a while now been in a thorny predicament given its relationship with Samsung. On one hand, Samsung supplies all of the processors that power Apple's wildly profitable lineup of iOS devices. And yet, on the other hand, Samsung has quickly emerged as Apple's chief competitor in the smartphone space. What's more, Apple has accused Samsung of "slavishly copying" Apple's own products and innovations instead of coming up with its own. Consequently, the two companies are currently engaged in a slew of intellectual property lawsuits across the globe.

That said, it's no secret that Apple is actively seeking to lessen its reliance on Samsung. It's been rumored for a while that Apple is hoping to move its AX processor production to TSMC sometime in the near future. And now comes a report that Apple has also engaged in discussions with Intel whereby they would become a significant supplier of Apple's A-series processors.

Software

Submission + - Microsoft, BSA and Others Push for Appeal on Oracle vs. Google Ruling (arstechnica.com)

sl4shd0rk writes: In 2012, Oracle took Google to court over the use of Java in Android. Judge William Alsup brought the ruling that the structure of APIs could not be copyrighted at all. Emerging from the proceedings, it was learned that Alsup himself had some programming background and wasn't bedazzled by by Oracle's thin arguments on the range-checking function. The ruling came, programmers rejoiced and Oracle vowed Appeal. It seems that time is coming now, nearly a year later, as Microsoft, BSA, EMC, Netapp, et al. get behind Oracle to overturn Alsup's ruling citing "destabilization" of the "entire software industry".

Submission + - Troll complaint dismissed; subscriber not necessarily infringer (blogspot.com)

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "The courts are finally starting to get it, that the subscriber to an internet access account which has been used for a copyright infringement is not necessarily the infringer. In AF Holdings v. Rogers, a case in the Southern District of California, the Chief Judge of the Court has granted a motion to dismiss the complaint for failure to state a claim where the only evidence the plaintiff has against defendant is that defendant appears to have been the subscriber to the internet access account in question. In his 7-page opinion (PDF), Chief Judge Barry Ted Moskowitz noted that "just because an IP address is registered to an individual does not mean that he or she is guilty of infringement when that IP address is used to commit infringing activity"."

Submission + - Utilities Racing to Plug Grid Before 'Disaster Strikes' (wsj.com)

FreeMichael61 writes: "In the latest episode of Spy vs. Spy, China rejects accusations its hacking U.S. companies to steal IP or bring down the grid. But there's no doubt the grid can be hacked, CIO Journal's Steve Rosenbush and Rachael King report. Industrial control networks are supposed to be protected from the Internet by an air gap that, it turns out, is largely theoretic. Rosenbush and King detail the attack vectors that hackers could use to bring down the electrical system in a neighborhood near you."

Submission + - Computers Shown to be Better Than Docs at Diagnosing, Prescribing Treatment (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: Applying the same technology used for voice recognition and credit card fraud detection to medical treatments could cut healthcare costs and improve patient outcomes by almost 50%, according to new research. The research by Indiana University found that using patient data with machine-learning algorithms can drastically improve both the cost and quality of healthcare through simulation modeling.The artificial intelligence models used for diagnosing and treating patients obtained a 30% to 35% increase in positive patient outcomes, the research found. This is not the first time AI has been used to diagnose and suggest treatments. Last year, IBM announced that its Watson supercomputer would be used in evaluating evidence-based cancer treatment options for physicians, driving the decision-making process down to a matter of seconds.
Space

Submission + - STRaND-1 – World's First Smartphone-Based Satellite Set to Launch (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: The University of Surrey’s Surrey Space Centre (SSC) and Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) are set to launch the world’s first smartphone-based satellite. Built around a Google Nexus One smartphone running on the Android operating system, the STRaND-1 (Surrey Training, Research and Nanosatellite Demonstrator) satellite will also be the U.K.’s first CubeSat to go into space.
United Kingdom

Submission + - Britain Could Switch Off Airport Radar And Release Spectrum (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Britain is considering switching off air traffic control radar systems and using "passive radar" instead. A two year feasibility study will consider using a network of ground stations which monitor broadcast TV signals and measure echoes from aircraft to determine their location and velocity. The system is not a new idea — early radar experiments used BBC shortwave transmitters as a signal source before antenna technology produced a transceiver suitable for radar — but could now be better than conventional radar thanks to new antenna designs and signal processing techniques. It will also save money and energy by eliminating transmitters — and release spectrum for 5G services."
Software

Submission + - Retail copies of Office 2013 are tied to a single computer forever (geek.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: With the launch of Office 2013 Microsoft has seen fit to upgrade the terms of the license agreement, and it’s not in favor of the end user. It seems installing a copy of the latest version of Microsoft’s Office suite of apps ties it to a single machine. For life.

On previous versions of Office it was a different story. The suite was associated with a “Licensed Device” and could only be used on a single device. But there was nothing to stop you uninstalling Office and installing it on another machine perfectly legally. With that option removed, Office 2013 effectively becomes a much more expensive proposition for many.

Science

Submission + - Electricity Gives Bubbles Super Strength (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Left to its own devices, a bubble will weaken and pop as the fluid sandwiched between two thin layers of soap succumbs to gravity and drains toward the floor. But when researchers trapped a bubble between two platinum electrodes and cranked up the voltage, the fluid reversed direction and actually flowed up, against the force of gravity. The newly strong and stable bubbles could live for hours, and even visibly change colors as their walls grew fatter. Because soap film is naturally only nanometers thick, this whimsical experiment could help scientists create more efficient labs-on-chips, the mazes of nanotunnels that can diagnose disease based on the movements of a miniscule drop of blood.
Security

Submission + - Raspberry Pi used for prototype hardware laptop docking station backdoor (nccgroup.com)

An anonymous reader writes: At Black Hat Europe in March a security researcher from NCC Group will show how a Raspberry Pi can be used as a hardware backdoor when built into a modified laptop docking station. While details on their blog are a little light at the moment it shows how versatile the platform is and the diverse applications outside of learning..

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