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Submission + - Bad USB C cable kills Google reviewer's laptop (amazon.com)

AmiMoJo writes: Google staff member Benson Leung has been reviewing USB C cables on Amazon for some time now, discovering that many are out of spec in one way or another. His most recent find is a cable that damaged his expensive Pixel C laptop and some of his test equipment, due to having the ground and +5V lines swapped over between each end. Ironically, the manufacturer's name is Surjtech.

Submission + - International Space Station Infected With Malware Carried by Russian Astronauts (ibtimes.co.uk)

DavidGilbert99 writes: Nowhere is safe. Even in the cold expanse of space, computer malware manages to find a way. According to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky, the SCADA systems on board the International Space Station have been infected by malware which was carried into space on USB sticks by Russian astronauts.
Censorship

Submission + - The Philippines' Cybercrime Prevention Act makes SOPA look reasonable (forbes.com)

silentbrad writes: From Forbes: "The dark days of SOPA and PIPA are behind the US, at least temporarily as copyright tycoons reground and restrategize, attempting to come up with measures that don’t cause the entire internet to shut down in protest. But one country has already moved ahead with similar legislation. The government of the Philippines has passed the Cybercrime Prevention Act, which on the surface, as usual, sounds perfectly well-intentioned. But when you read the actual contents of what’s been deemed “cybercrime,” SOPA’s proposed censorship sounds downright lax by comparison. Yes, there’s the usual hacking, cracking, identity theft and spamming, which most of us can agree should be illegal. But there’s also cybersex, pornography, file-sharing (SOPA’s main target) and the most controversial provision, online libel.
United Kingdom

Submission + - BBC Keeps Android Flash Alive In The UK (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Although Adobe wants to can mobile Flash, the Android Flash app has returned to the Google Play store in the UK after disappearing earlier this month. It has come back because of pressure from large organisations, in particular the BBC, whose popular iPlayer video on demand service uses Flash. The Android app is back, apparently or as long as it takes the BBC to move to HTML5"
Patents

Submission + - Mobile Patent Wars Explained (and Why Apple Should Win) (infoworld.com)

GMGruman writes: "For more than a year, Apple, Samsung, HTC, Motorola, Microsoft, and others have been engaged in hand-to-hand legal combat over patents used in mobile devices. At first, this seemed like standard corporate warfare, using patents as the equivalent of roadside bombs. But a series of court rulings over many months in several countries shows the war is about something much deeper: the abuse by (mainly) Android device makers of the patents used in standards, which are supposed to be open to all under fair licenses (called FRAND). Except this compromise between patent rights and open standards has been anything but honest, and the courts and even the E.U. and U.S. are beginning to take action. Ironically, although typically painted as the bad gut in the mobile patents fights, in the FRAND fight, it looks like Apple is the victim — one that hasn't been afraid to fight back."
Privacy

Submission + - $1B of TSA Nude Body Scanners Made Worthless (wordpress.com)

TheNextCorner writes: "This video is here to demonstrate that the TSA’s insistence that the nude body scanner program is effective and necessary is nothing but a fraud, just like their claims that the program is safe (radiation what?) and non-invasive (nude pictures who?). The scanners are now effectively worthless, as anyone can beat them with virtually no effort."
Social Networks

Submission + - LinkedIn Profiles Contain Fewer Lies Than Resumes (neoacademic.com)

RichDiesal writes: New research reveals that personal information provided on LinkedIn may contain fewer deceptions about prior work experience and prior work responsibilities than traditional resumes. However, LinkedIn profiles contain more deceptions about personal interests and hobbies. This researchers believe this may be because participants are equally motivated to deceive employers in both settings, but perceive lies about work experience on LinkedIn as more easily verifiable.
Government

Submission + - Energy.gov: where information goes to die (thebulletin.org)

__aaqpaq9254 writes: Dawn Stover recounts her attempts to access information at energy.gov, the US Energy Department's "cutting-edge, interactive information platform," which apparently isn't any of those things. Especially frustrating were her attempts to locate important documents related to the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. An interesting read for anyone interested in true government transparency.
Businesses

Submission + - How the US Lost Out on iPhone Work

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Not long ago, Apple boasted that its products were made in America. Today, almost all of the 70 million iPhones, 30 million iPads and 59 million other products Apple sold last year manufactured overseas. "It isn’t just that workers are cheaper abroad," write Charles Duhig and Keith Bradsher. "Rather, Apple’s executives believe the vast scale of overseas factories as well as the flexibility, diligence and industrial skills of foreign workers have outpaced their American counterparts so much that “Made in the U.S.A.” is no longer a viable option for most Apple products." Apple executives say that going overseas, at this point, is their only option and recount the time Apple redesigned the iPhone’s screen at the last minute, forcing an assembly line overhaul. A foreman immediately roused 8,000 workers inside the company’s dormitories, each employee was given a biscuit and a cup of tea, guided to a workstation and within half an hour started a 12-hour shift fitting glass screens into beveled frames. Within 96 hours, the plant was producing over 10,000 iPhones a day. “The speed and flexibility is breathtaking,” says one Apple executive. “There’s no American plant that can match that.” Apple’s success has benefited the US economy by empowering entrepreneurs and creating jobs at companies like cellular providers and businesses shipping Apple products but ultimately, Apple executives say curing unemployment is not Apple's job. “We don’t have an obligation to solve America’s problems. Our only obligation is making the best product possible.”"
Software

Richard Stallman's Dissenting View of Steve Jobs 1452

Garabito writes "Richard Stallman, founder of the Free Software Foundation, has posted his not-so-fond memories of Steve Jobs on his personal site, saying, 'As Chicago Mayor Harold Washington said of the corrupt former Mayor Daley, "I'm not glad he's dead, but I'm glad he's gone." Nobody deserves to have to die — not Jobs, not Mr. Bill, not even people guilty of bigger evils than theirs. But we all deserve the end of Jobs' malign influence on people's computing.' His statement has spurred reaction from the community; some even asking to the Free Software movement to find a new voice."

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