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Your Rights Online

Submission + - Finland to Try Hospitaling Pirates (ylex.yle.fi)

Pringless writes: Finland, a country in the northern Europe, has become known for its fast internet access, Nokia and one of the first countries to declare internet access a basic human right. The country is now trying a new way to cure pirates — hospitalizing and helping them overcome their addiction to filesharing. The local legistrators are saying that in this way their lives aren't destroyed by huge legal fees and they will still get help for their problem, provided by local free health care.
Businesses

Submission + - Kickstarter Won't Let Me Kickstart My Kickstarter To Buy Kickstarter (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "Comedian Eric Moneypenny writes for Motherboard to discuss the trials and tribulations of trying to create a Kickstarter to buy Kickstarter:

"What would’ve been better than the biggest Kickstarter of all-time? A Kickstarter to raise $19 million, almost 6 times bigger than the richest Kickstarter ever ($3.3 million).""

Intel

The Big Technical Mistakes of History 244

An anonymous reader tips a PC Authority review of some of the biggest technical goofs of all time. "As any computer programmer will tell you, some of the most confusing and complex issues can stem from the simplest of errors. This article looking back at history's big technical mistakes includes some interesting trivia, such as NASA's failure to convert measurements to metric, resulting in the Mars Climate Orbiter being torn apart by the Martian atmosphere. Then there is the infamous Intel Pentium floating point fiasco, which cost the company $450m in direct costs, a battering on the world's stock exchanges, and a huge black mark on its reputation. Also on the list is Iridium, the global satellite phone network that promised to make phones work anywhere on the planet, but required 77 satellites to be launched into space."
Education

3rd Grader Accused of Hacking Schools' Computer System 344

Gud writes "According to The Washington Post a 9-year-old was able to hack into his county's school computer network and change such things as passwords, course work, and enrollment info. From the article: 'Police say a 9-year-old McLean boy hacked into the Blackboard Learning System used by the county school system to change teachers' and staff members' passwords, change or delete course content, and change course enrollment. One of the victims was Fairfax Superintendent Jack D. Dale, according to an affidavit filed by a Fairfax detective in Fairfax Circuit Court this week. But police and school officials decided no harm, no foul. The boy did not intend to do any serious damage, and didn't, so the police withdrew and are allowing the school district to handle the half-grown hacker.'"
Biotech

Submission + - Students, The Other Unprotected Lab Animals 1

theodp writes: "Slate reports on the horrible — and preventable — death of a young UCLA biochemist in a t-butyl lithium incident, which lead a Chemical Health and Safety columnist to the disheartening conclusion that most academic laboratories are unsafe venues for work or study. It's estimated that accidents and injuries occur hundreds of times more frequently in academic labs than in industrial ones. Why? For one thing, Slate says, occupational safety and health laws that protect workers in hazardous jobs apply only to employees, not to undergrads, grad students, or research fellows who receive stipends from outside funders."

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