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Comment Re:Why only east of the Mississippi? (Score 3, Informative) 101

Texas and California are two of the four states with the most "action-level" lead test results. Some Oklahoma cities have among the highest lead levels in the country.

The map shows cities in all of EPA regions 1-5, and none in regions 6-10. It seems likely that the Guardian staff simply started working their way through audit results, and stopped when they had enough material for a story.

Comment Re:I would expect that to be somewhere in China. (Score 4, Informative) 151

As I mentioned in another comment, out of date. 25 years ago the Brown Cloud was a real problem. Today, Denver doesn't even make the 25 worst cities in the country for overall air pollution. Having lived here while it happened, it's just absolutely amazing how much cleaner the air is now.

Comment Behind the times (Score 3, Informative) 151

The OP's observation is really behind the times.

I moved to the Denver area 28+ years ago. Since I got here, the state's population has gone from 3.3M to 5.5M, almost all in the Front Range urban corridor. Much of that growth has been driven by tech, it's just been quiet. The state is consistently in the top several for VC money spent. There's also a long history of Colorado companies reaching a certain size and then being acquired by the giant coastal firms.

Comment Blaming the wrong organization (Score 1) 217

The article, like so many others, is blaming the wrong organization. (1) Agency budgets are micro-managed by Congress. There's no money to spend on system replacement unless Congress says so. (2) Congress, like legislatures in general, is extremely reluctant to appropriate money to replace something that works, even if it is just barely limping along. Shiny new toys for killing people a possible exception. (3) When procurement does finally happen, it's done under rules set by Congress that work reasonably well for paper clips and snowplows. Not so well for software.

I spent three years on staff trying to explain IT things to a state legislature. Educational. Frustrating as hell.

Comment Re:They tried it before with Cablecards (Score 2) 167

This year for the holidays I bought myself an HDHomeRun Prime by SiliconDust. Comcast gave me an M-card with no questions, and the tech support number in the documents (a call center that does only Cablecard activations) handled the activation fine. It would have been somewhat easier if there were a decent online description of exactly what numbers the call center needed. Three independent tuners, DLNA compliant, and delivers the HD streams over our household LAN (some wired, some wireless). Works fine to my Mac and my Android phone. There are issues with my old Android tablet, but those involve the limited hardware there, not the delivery.

Comment APL... (Score 2) 414

...back in the fairly early days. Branch (of various forms) as the only flow control. Odd scoping rules. Often faster to rewrite a line of code from scratch than to figure out what you had written the previous time. OTOH, having a full symbolic debugger really spoiled me.

Comment Writers v. aggregators (Score 1) 311

I'm perfectly happy to pay writers for well-researched well-written content. I'm not happy paying an aggregator for access to what they think is good writing. Good writers are rare; the internet has made aggregation cheap and easy, with the expected outcome that there are lots of terrible aggregation sites out there.

Comment Re:Dynamic range compression (Score 1) 135

I'm not sure what their reasons are. Mine used to be that I had to deal with various non-trivial levels of background noise -- turn the volume up loud enough to hear the quiet parts over that noise and the loud parts were enough to knock you over. These days, it's more that aging ears have greatly narrowed the spread between loud enough to understand and loud enough to hurt.

Comment Re:Forbes blocks browsers... and... this is absurd (Score 1) 330

I wonder what's wrong/right with my setup? Opening this link in a new private window gets me the stock Forbes opening page, which includes a "proceed to site" link (sometimes after a few second countdown). Some dumb quote but no ads. My blocker stops 10-15 elements on each Forbes page, but I get the article. No mention that I'm running an ad blocker.

Mac OSX 10.11.2, Firefox 43.0.3, uBlock Origin 1.5.1.

Comment Western US anti-nuclear feelings (Score 1) 366

In the western US, the anti-nuclear sentiment has more to do with historically bad experiences with non-commercial activities. Open-air nuclear tests. A few years ago the DOE declared the Rocky Flats site in Colorado to be clean; there's a growing body of evidence that they did the job on the cheap and the remaining plutonium will get loose. Last year the WIPP in New Mexico had a leak, and DOE agreed to pay a $74M fine. This month, DOE asked the court for a further 17 year delay to 2039 to finish the vitrification plant that is key to cleaning up the disaster that is the Hanford Site in Washington. Given Republican attacks on the DOE budget, Washington has asked the reasonable question, "What are the chances Congress will continue to fund construction for another 24 years?" On the commercial side, Yucca Flats will probably open eventually, and be substantially expanded, against the wishes of the people of Nevada.

It's not all that hard to understand why western politicians are not given to believing the nuclear scientists and engineers who say, "Yes, but this time will be different."

Comment Re:Idiot (Score 2) 366

At least in the US Western Interconnect, it's feasible to solve this problem. The West has diverse renewable sources -- hydro, wind, solar, even geothermal. The West has these over geographic diversity -- eg, the wind is unlikely to stop blowing in both the Columbia Gorge and Wyoming's South Pass at the same time. There is plenty of opportunity for pumped hydro storage. It's not inexpensive because you do have to overbuild capacity, but there are a lot of detailed studies that show it's feasible.

The Eastern Interconnect, on the other hand, is a completely different problem, both in scale and in complexity.

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