Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
DEAL: For $25 - Add A Second Phone Number To Your Smartphone for life! Use promo code SLASHDOT25. Also, Slashdot's Facebook page has a chat bot now. Message it for stories and more. Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 Internet speed test! ×

Submission + - Second parchment manuscript copy of Declaration of Independence found (bostonglobe.com)

Okian Warrior writes: Two Harvard University researchers announced Friday that they have found a second parchment manuscript copy of the Declaration of Independence in a tiny records office in southern England.

The only other parchment copy is maintained by the National Archives in Washington, D.C., researchers Emily Sneff and Danielle Allen said in a statement.

The newly discovered document — which the two have dated to the 1780s — was found in the town of Chichester archives, and is believed to have originally belonged to Duke of Richmond who was known as the “Radical Duke,’’ for the support he gave to Americans during the Revolutionary War, the researchers said.

Submission + - Carly Fiorina wants to run against Senator Tim Kaine (cnn.com)

McGruber writes: Fired HP CEO, failed Presidential candidate turned Ted Cruz's running mate, and FoxNews pundit Carly Fiorina is now "strongly considering" a run to unseat Hillary Clinton's former running mate Tim Kaine for Virginia senator in 2018 (http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/18/politics/carly-fiorina-debates-senate-run/).

Submission + - 44% Of Americans Won't Pay Any Federal Income Tax (zerohedge.com)

schwit1 writes: More than four in 10 American households (44.3%) — or upwards of 76 million — didn't pay any income tax to the federal government last year, according to data for 2016 from the Tax Policy Center. This year that number is expected to be roughly the same, at 43.9%.

Most of these people aren't paying income taxes because they either don't have any income that is taxable (many fall below the poverty line), or because they get enough tax breaks and don't owe the government money. Common tax breaks include the child tax credit, the earned income tax credit (EITC), and the exclusion of some or all Social Security income, explains Roberton Williams of the Tax Policy Center.

Submission + - Phishing Attack Uses Domains Identical to Known Safe Sites

JThaddeus writes: Current versions of Chrome and Firefox are vulnerable to a phishing attack that uses unicode to fake the appearance of a legitimate website. Additionally fraudsters can use their unicode domain names to get certificates from LetsEncrypt so that the the browser URL is visually indistinguishable from the site it is copying.

Submission + - Kim Jong Un's rockets are getting an important boost — from China (washingtonpost.com)

schwit1 writes: When North Korea launched its Kwangmyongsong-4 satellite into space last February, officials heralded the event as a birthday gift for dead leader Kim Jong Il. But the day also brought an unexpected prize for the country’s adversaries: priceless intelligence in the form of rocket parts that fell into the Yellow Sea.

Entire sections of booster rocket were snagged by South Korea’s navy and then scrutinized by international weapons experts for clues about the state of North Korea’s missile program. Along with motor parts and wiring, investigators discerned a pattern. Many key components were foreign-made, acquired from businesses based in China.

The trove “demonstrates the continuing critical importance of high-end, foreign-sourced components” in building the missiles North Korea uses to threaten its neighbors, a U.N. expert team concluded in a report released last month. When U.N. officials contacted the implicated Chinese firms to ask about the parts, the report said, they received only silence.

Submission + - Second Opinion From Doctor Nets Different Diagnosis 88% Of Time, Study Finds (studyfinds.org) 3

schwit1 writes: When it comes to treating a serious illness, two brains are better than one. A new study finds that nearly 9 in 10 people who go for a second opinion after seeing a doctor are likely to leave with a refined or new diagnosis from what they were first told.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic examined 286 patient records of individuals who had decided to consult a second opinion, hoping to determine whether being referred to a second specialist impacted one's likelihood of receiving an accurate diagnosis.

The study, conducted using records of patients referred to the Mayo Clinic's General Internal Medicine Division over a two-year period, ultimately found that when consulting a second opinion, the physician only confirmed the original diagnosis 12 percent of the time.

Among those with updated diagnoses, 66% received a refined or redefined diagnosis, while 21% were diagnosed with something completely different than what their first physician concluded.

Submission + - WikiLeaks releases Marble, used to hide the source of CIA malware attacks (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: Today, WikiLeaks publishes the third installment of its Vault 7 CIA leaks. We've already had the Year Zero files which revealed a number of exploits for popular hardware and software, and the Dark Matter batch which focused on Mac and iPhone exploits.

Now we have Marble to look at. A collection of 676 source code files, the Marble cache reveals details of the CIA's Marble Framework tool, used to hide the true source of CIA malware, and sometimes going as far as appearing to originate from countries other than the US.

Submission + - Scientists Discover Way to Transmit Taste of Lemonade Over Internet (vice.com)

schwit1 writes: With the use of electrodes and sensors—and zero lemons—a group of researchers at the University of Singapore have announced that they can convince you that you're drinking lemonade, even if it's just water. Plus, they can send you a glass of lemonade virtually over the internet.

In an experiment that involved 13 tasters, the subjects' taste buds were stimulated using electricity from receiving electrodes; LED lights mimicked a lemony color. Some were convinced that the water they were drinking was, in fact, almost as sour as lemonade.

"We're working on a full virtual cocktail with smell, taste, and color all covered. We want to be able to create any drink."

Why would anyone want to drink a virtual lemonade? Advocates of virtual eating say that virtual foods can replace foods that are bad for you, that you may be allergic to, or that you shouldn't eat because of a medical condition.

Submission + - Startup Says It Can Replace Traditional College With a One-Year Program (edsurge.com)

jyosim writes: A venture-backed company today announced a new educational offering billed as an alternative to the standard undergraduate experience. It will last only one calendar year, feature a curriculum designed in close coordination with well-known employers, and cost nothing—at least at the outset. Students who attend, however, must promise to give up 15 percent of their incomes for three years once they land a job that pays $50,000 or more.

The catch on any so-called income-share agreement for college, is that the typical student ends up paying slightly more than they would in student loans. But there's no risk that the student will end up in crippling debt.

What's missing from MissionU is Shakespeare, or any other traditional liberal-arts courses. The company's founder, Adam Braun, argues that students can easily pick up such courses throughout their lives, using MOOCs or other options.

But academic leaders, even some of those enthusiastic about digital teaching, have concerns about MissionU. One calls it: "an employment service and on-the job training, at the employee’s expense."

But its backers say it's just another option, and that the one-size-fits-all Bachelor's Degree is over.

Submission + - SPAM: Bricklaying robots have arived

aberglas writes: Not quite as fast as a human, yet, and probably still more expensive. But they build real walls, up to spec. Only simple walls for now. But this is the beginning of much more automation on building sites, particularly for new constructions. And they do not have to work unsupervised to be useful.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: NY bill would require removal of inaccurate, irrelevant or excessive statements 1

schwit1 writes: In a bill aimed at securing a "right to be forgotten," introduced by Assemblyman David I. Weprin and (as Senate Bill 4561 by state Sen. Tony Avella), New York politicians would require people to remove 'inaccurate,' 'irrelevant,' 'inadequate' or 'excessive' statements about others...
  • Within 30 days of a "request from an individual,"
  • "all search engines and online speakers] shall remove ... content about such individual, and links or indexes to any of the same, that is 'inaccurate', 'irrelevant', 'inadequate' or 'excessive,'' "
  • "and without replacing such removed ... content with any disclaimer [or] takedown notice."
  • " '[I]naccurate', 'irrelevant', 'inadequate', or 'excessive' shall mean content,"
  • "which after a significant lapse in time from its first publication,"
  • "is no longer material to current public debate or discourse,"
  • "especially when considered in light of the financial, reputational and/or demonstrable other harm that the information ... is causing to the requester's professional, financial, reputational or other interest,"
  • "with the exception of content related to convicted felonies, legal matters relating to violence, or a matter that is of significant current public interest, and as to which the requester's role with regard to the matter is central and substantial."

Failure to comply would make the search engines or speakers liable for, at least, statutory damages of $250/day plus attorney fees.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Astronomers Just Found a Star Orbiting a Black Hole at 1% the Speed of Light

schwit1 writes: Astronomers have spotted a star whizzing around a vast black hole at about 2.5 times the distance between Earth and the Moon, and it takes only half an hour to complete one orbit.

To put that into perspective, it takes roughly 28 days for our Moon to do a single lap around our relatively tiny planet at speeds of 3,683 km(2,288 miles) per hour.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - US Federal Budget Proposal Cuts Science Funding (documentcloud.org)

hey! writes: The US Office of Management and Budget has released a budget "blueprint" which outlines substantial cuts in both basic research and applied technology funding.

The proposal includes a whopping 18% reduction in National Institutes of Health medical research. NIH does get a new 500 million fund to track emerging infectious agents like Zika in the US, but loses its funding to monitor those agents overseas.

The Department of Energy's research programs also get an 18% cut in research, potentially affecting basic physics research, high energy physics, fusion research, and supercomputing. Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA-E) gets the ax, as does the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program which enabled Tesla to manufacture its Model S sedan.

EPA loses all climate research funding, and about half the research funding targeted at human health impacts of pollution. The EnergyStar program is eliminated Superfund funding is drastically reduced. The Chesapeake Bay and Great Lakes cleanup programs are also eliminated, as is all screening of pesticides for endocrine disruption.

In the Department of Commerce, Sea Grant is eliminated, along with all coastal zone research funding. Existing weather satellites GOES and JPSS continue funding, but JPSS-3 and -4 appear to be getting the ax. Support for transfer of federally funded research and technology to small and mid-sized manufacturers is eliminated.

NASA gets a slight trim, and a new focus on deep space exploration paid for by an elimination of Earth Science programs.

You can read more about this "blueprint" in Nature, Science, and the Washington Post, which broke the story.

Submission + - Inside a Phishing Gang that Targets Victims of iPhone Theft (krebsonsecurity.com)

tsu doh nimh writes: Brian Krebs has a readable and ironic story about a phishing-as-a-service product that iPhone thieves can use to phish the Apple iCloud credentials from people who have recently had an iPhone lost or stolen. The phishing service — which charged as much as $120 for successful phishing attempts targeting iPhone 6s users — was poorly secured, and a security professional that Krebs worked with managed to guess several passwords for users on the service. From there, the story looks at how this phishing service works, how it tracks victims, and ultimately how one of its core resellers phished his own iCloud account and inadvertently gave his exact location as a result.

Slashdot Top Deals

panic: kernel trap (ignored)

Working...