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Submission + - ChaCha crushes AES on mobile (speedify.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It's been just a couple years since D.J. Bernstein's Chacha20-poly1305 cipher, first arrived on the scene. ChaCha is an encryption cipher intended for fast mobile performance. The real world numbers are in, and they're much better than AES on mobile devices. In tests, Cloudflare is seeing 3x the performance, and Speedify is seeing 2x throughput. Is it time for good old AES to get out of the way?

Submission + - The other Russian cyberattack that never happened (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: Earlier this week, the Washington Post made headlines of its own for reporting that “intelligence sources” were saying Russia had hacked into the U.S. power grid, which is a thing that did not happen. In fact, this wasn't even the first time it hadn't happened — just five years ago, a Senate report tore into Homeland Security for making the same claims with even less evidence. Will legislators ever learn?

Submission + - How Slashdot Inspired Our New Redundancy Feature (speedify.com)

agizis writes: In October, there was an 'Ask Slashdot' post, wondering how to use a VPN, "so that the same TCP and UDP traffic goes over both links, and the fastest packet on either link 'wins' and the other is discarded?" At the time, there was no good solution. Thanks to Speedify's new "Redundant Mode, this is now possible. By sending UDP traffic over every link, Speedify really can drop average latency significantly. Your opponents in Battlefield won't stand a chance!

Submission + - You're Paying Comcast's Electric Bill (speedify.com) 3

agizis writes: We know Comcast is rolling out a new WiFi network that they're installing in customer’s homes, but most articles glossed over the routers' power usage. So using a Kill-A-Watt power meter, I actually measured and Comcast is saving tens of millions per year on the backs of their customers. Sign my change.org petition asking Comcast to compensate its customers.

Submission + - Comcast is turning your home into a public hotspot. (speedify.com)

agizis writes: Comcast has started using customers’ routers to create public wifi hotspots. They claim the "opt-out" hotspots don't leech from your paid bandwidth. But the bandwidth comes from somewhere. So, is it extra or is it what you paid for? The answer matters, because if they’re using your bandwidth, you should opt-out, but if it's extra, then you should start using it.

Submission + - Scaling a Cloud Service Without EC2 (connectify.me)

agizis writes: Last May, we began developing a worldwide cloud service where speed and reliability is everything. Like most startups, we started on Amazon Web Services (AWS). We fell in love with the functionality of EC2, but the honeymoon was over fast: the locations and pricing were just too restrictive. It's been a sometimes painful ride, so I wanted to share the story of how we broke the golden EC2 handcuffs and built our scalable service at a fraction of the EC2 price tag.

Submission + - Taking a QUIC Test Drive (connectify.me)

agizis writes: Google presented their new QUIC (Quick UDP Internet Connections) protocol to the IETF yesterday as a future replacement for TCP. It was discussed here when it was originally announced, but now there’s real working code. How fast is it really? We wanted to know, so we dug in and benchmarked QUIC at different bandwidths, latencies and reliability levels (test code included, of course), and ran our results by the QUIC team.

Submission + - Open Source Drug Discovery Prompts a Fundamental Heart Failure Breakthrough (sciencecodex.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Case-Western researchers, led by Saptarsi Haldar MD., have made a fundamental discovery that could prevent heart failure after reviewing the "chemical recipe" for a cancer-treating molecule made open source by Jay Bradner MD. (whose TED Talk articulates the open source approach to drug discovery: http://www.ted.com/talks/jay_bradner_open_source_cancer_research.html) This cross-discipline discovery, which was published in the August 2013 issue of CELL, is a fundamental breakthrough in heart failure research, and highlights the value of an open source approach outside of software development. Now, if only drug companies could be held to the same ideals!

Submission + - Slashdot killed my Kickstarter campaign

agizis writes: Alex from Connectify here. I wanted to say thanks to all of you who commented on the Slashdot story about our Kickstarter campaign It was super-educational discussing Switchboard with all of you: you wanted your own servers, and we weren’t doing enough to communicate what was so special about Switchboard. Based in a large part on your feedback, we blew up our Kickstarter campaign, and changed almost everything. Thanks, Slashdot. This isn’t reddit, but ask me anything.

Submission + - Seamless Channel Bonding (engadget.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Channel bonding over the Internet is a notoriously hard problem, with even the best tools in Linux just using round robin to combine identical connections. But that might be changing, as Connectify, the spook backed networking software company has announced new channel bonding software that claims to use bandwidth, latency and reliability metrics to perfectly bond any Internet connections together. Engadget has tried it and said their "test of the beta software on our end has worked seamlessly so far, requiring just a software installation and two or more internet connections (two ADSL lines in our case)."

Submission + - Making Wireless Carriers Play Together 1

An anonymous reader writes: Ok, so the idea of opening all Wi-Fi networks in a misthought utopian vision didn’t go over so well. But no one discussed the best part of open Wi-Fi networks: bonding different Wi-Fi and mobile carriers to get the best price and decent performance. We could save money and avoid lock in by bouncing to whoever gives us the best rate, and, when we need speed, jump on all of them at once for a network bonded boost.

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