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Submission + - World's oldest bible goes online

99luftballon writes: "AP is reporting that the remaining fragments of the world's oldest bible are to be put online by the British Museum. Very few people have seen it due to its fragile state and it'll give scholars and those interested their first chance to take a look.

However, I've got a feeling that some people won't be happy to see it online, since it makes no mention of the resurrection, a fairly central part of Christian belief."

Submission + - More on the San Franscisco Network Hijacking (

masdog writes: "It turns out that the San Francisco network hijacking isn't really a network hijacking. According to a source close to the situtation, the City's Fiberwan routers were set up with only one user — Terry Childs, and restricted to local authentication. To make matters worse, the City's IT leadership not only knew of the situtation, but accepted it. How this translates into four counts of computer tampering is anyone's guess when the City's unspoken policy allowed for the situation. That doesn't excuse a seasoned IT professional from training a backup."

Submission + - New Theory Explains Periodic Mass Extinctions

i_like_spam writes: The theory that the dinosaurs were wiped out by an asteroid impact, the K-T extinction, is well known and supported by fossil and geological evidence. Asteroid impact theory does not apply to the other fluctuations in biodiversity, however, which follow an approximate 62 million-year cycle. As reported in Science news, a new theory seems to explain periodic mass extinctions. The new theory found that oscillations in the Sun relative to the plane of the Milky Way correlate with changes in biodiversity on Earth. The researchers suggest that an increase in the exposure of Earth to extragalatic cosmic rays causes mass extinctions. Here is the original paper describing the finding.
United States

Submission + - Minn. Bridge Collapse is Just the Beginning

ntmokey writes: The nation's infrastructure is aging, heavily used, and dangerous, according to Stephen Flynn, a national security expert who wrote an op-ed piece for Popular Mechanics. Flynn believes incidents like the collapse of Minnesota's I-35 bridge and the recent explosion of a steam pipe in New York City are wake-up calls to our nation's leaders that we need to invest more in the structures we rely on (sometimes without even knowing it) every day. Our ports, roadways, railroads, air traffic control and electricity systems are were all top-notch when they were installed by previous generations — but we've come to take them for granted and we're starting to feel the sting of neglect. Flynn's not just waving red flags in light of recent events either, he wrote a book about the pending crisis that was published in February.

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