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Submission + - Disappearing stuff from the internet ( 1

inode_buddha writes: Its well-known that removing something from the internet is nearly impossible, like taking the pee out of the pool. That said, somebody or something is doing a credible job of trying lately. First there was the UCDavis pepper-spray video. Now its a Bernie Sanders ad. Nobody seems to know who or why but it was on the net for a few hours and it is rapdly being pulled and scrubbed. Any one got ideas?

Comment When I was in school (Score 5, Interesting) 387

When I was in school, we were taught about Francis Cabot Lowell, who heroically copied machine plans in England to use in the US for textile mills.

England was so worried that their monopoly on their mill technology would be taken that they would search ships, cargo and passenger for hidden plans.

Fortunately for the US, Lowell memorized the plans and was able to build his own plants in the New World. His business was the beginning of the industrialization of the New World. Without which, the United States would have continued to be merely agrarian in nature. Does anyone know if they still teach this lesson in gradeschools, or was it killed when they started teaching kids to respect copyrights more?

The Courts

Submission + - RIAA assessed $107,834 in attorneys fees ( 2

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "Tanya Andersen, the disabled single mom from Oregon who's been fighting the RIAA since 2005, has just been awarded $107,834 in attorneys fees against the record companies. This eclipses the $68,685 awarded in Capitol v. Foster and will no doubt inspire many more RIAA targets to fight back, and encourage many more lawyers to take these cases on. Jon Newton of, who has been covering the Tanya Andersen case from Day 1, writes that "RIAA nemesis Tanya Andersen has achieved another milestone victory. She fought Vivendi Universal, EMI, Warner Music and Sony BMG's RIAA to a standstill, forcing it to drop its spurious file sharing case against her, and now an Oregon court has awarded her close to $108,000 in fees and costs.....[L]awyers representing RIAA victims....[wi]ll be able to proceed with counterclaims bolstered by the knowledge they'll be paid their work.""

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