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Submission + - EFF Asks FTC To Demand 'Truth In Labeling' For DRM (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Interesting move by Cory Doctorow and the EFF in sending some letters to the FTC making a strong case that DRM requires some "truth in labeling" details in order to make sure people know what they're buying. The argument is pretty straightforward (PDF): "The legal force behind DRM makes the issue of advance notice especially pressing. It’s bad enough to when a product is designed to prevent its owner from engaging in lawful, legitimate, desirable conduct — but when the owner is legally prohibited from reconfiguring the product to enable that conduct, it’s vital that they be informed of this restriction before they make a purchase, so that they might make an informed decision. Though many companies sell products with DRM encumbrances, few provide notice of these encumbrances. Of those that do, fewer still enumerate the restrictions in plain, prominent language. Of the few who do so, none mention the ability of the manufacturer to change the rules of the game after the fact, by updating the DRM through non-negotiable updates that remove functionality that was present at the time of purchase." In a separate letter (PDF) from EFF, along with a number of other consumer interest groups, but also content creators like Baen Books, Humble Bundle and McSweeney's, they suggest some ways that a labeling notice might work.

Submission + - Facebook Rolling Out New Privacy Settings (pcmag.com)

adeelarshad82 writes: Today Facebook has started rolling out new privacy settings intended to give users more control over who can see their profiles. The social networking site has been testing these changes with a limited group of U.S-based users since July, but is now rolling them out to all of its 350 million users. When the update hits a user's account, they will be presented with a "transition tool" that requires members to review and update their privacy settings. There will be two options: preserve old settings or accept privacy recommendations from Facebook.

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