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Books

Submission + - A Digital Public Library Without Paper Books (informationweek.com)

CowboyRobot writes: "In San Antonio, a judge and a precinct commissioner are proposing a plan to create a library called BiblioTech that offers electronic media exclusively, offering patrons only e-readers and digital materials. "BiblioTech intends to start with 100 e-readers that can be loaned out, 50 pre-loaded e-readers for children, 50 computer stations, 25 laptops and 25 tablets, with additional accommodations planned for the visually impaired." But the economics have yet to be ironed out. "A typical library branch might circulate 10,000 titles a month... To do that electronically would be cost-prohibitive — most libraries can't afford to supply that many patrons with e-reading devices at one time. And expecting library visitors to bring their own devices may be expecting too much.""
Data Storage

Submission + - SSD prices fall dramatically in 2012 but increase in Q4 (techreport.com)

crookedvulture writes: "Solid-state drives became much more affordable in 2012. The median price for 240-256GB models fell by about 44% over the course of the year and now sits around 83 cents per gigabyte. Lower-capacity drives also got cheaper, albeit by smaller margins that kept median prices from dipping below the $1/GB threshold. Surprisingly, most drives actually got more expensive over the fourth quarter, despite Black Friday and other holiday sales. This upswing was driven largely by OCZ's decision to back off its strategy of aggressively discounting drives to gain market share, allowing its rivals to raise prices, as well. Although some new models arrived with next-generation 19- and 20-nm NAND that should be cheaper to produce, those drives didn't debut at lower prices. We may have to wait a while before SSD makers pass the savings along to consumers."
Operating Systems

Submission + - GPL3 helping FreeBSD take users away from Linux?

WilliamX writes: GPLv3 will help FreeBSD take some users away from Linux, according to the founder and vice president of The FreeBSD Foundation.

"Through extremely successful evangelization, and the popularity of Linux, the misconception that OpenSource and the GPL are synonymous has become pervasive," he said. "In short, there is a large base of OpenSource consumers that are suddenly very interested in understanding alternatives to GPL licensed software."

"Against the backdrop of GPLv3, the stark difference between the BSD licensing philosophy and that of the Free Software Foundation are only too clear."

"A GPL proponent might argue that a license for free software must be upgraded periodically since we cannot anticipate what new use models for free software might be developed that restrict freedom. The BSD license is as permissive as possible exactly because we cannot predict the future or to what beneficial purpose (commercial or otherwise) our software will be used." said Gibbs.
Space

Submission + - Time is to space as mind is to body?

foozwak writes: Could time be the 'mind' of space, such that the passage of time is a dynamic, causality-based, emergent process akin to the cognitive processes which make up the experience of embodied consciousness?

If so, what would this mean for apparently-independent consciousnesses located within that matrix?

In other words; if space is thinking, are we its thoughts?

For more information, read the originating paper by Samuel Alexander or a recent variant such as Dorothy Emmet.
The Courts

US May Invoke "State Secrets" To Stop Banking Suit 211

An anonymous reader sends us to the International Herald Tribune for news that the Bush administration is signaling that it plans to turn once again to a favorite legal tool, the 'state secrets' privilege. The administration wants to shut down a lawsuit brought against Swift, a huge Belgium banking cooperative that that the article calls the "nerve center of the global banking industry," after it was revealed that Swift secretly let the CIA comb through millions of private financial records. Quoting: "Two US banking customers sued Swift on invasion-of-privacy grounds. Many legal and financial analysts expected that the lawsuit would be thrown out because US banking privacy laws are considered much more lax than those in much of Europe. But to the surprise of many, a judge refused to throw out the lawsuit in a ruling in June."
Music

Interesting Admissions From Record Industry 286

way2trivial writes "Many in the Slashdot community say the reason music sales are off is the content. It appears the industry and some music producers agree. In todays NYTimes magazine there is an article that says the quality of todays music is the problem. I have an issue with one part however, it reads "...and the once lucrative album market has been overshadowed by downloaded singles, which mainly benefits Apple" and here I thought Apple made most of their money with their hardware sales and a pittance on each track, giving the majority to the producer."

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