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The Internet

Submission + - Another probe, another vindication in Climategate (skunkpost.com)

crimeandpunishment writes: It would appear the uproar over "Climategate" should have the life expectancy of a snowball in July. An independent British report largely vindicates the scientists involved in the leak of hundreds of e-mails from a climate research center. The probe found no evidence of dishonesty or corruption...but did criticize the scientists for not sharing their data with critics. This is the third major investigation into the theft of the e-mails, which were leaked online just before a U.N. climate change conference last November.

Submission + - Hands-on with Pixel Qi screens in full sunlight (olpcnews.com)

griffjon writes: "Side-by-side comparison of the OLPC's screen and an Acer with the new Pixel Qi screen installed, both of course sharing Mary Lou Jepsen's screen technology:

"The XO's dual mode screen still rules in terms of pixel resolution at 1200 x 900 vs. the Acer's 1024 x 600. It was amazing to see Windows 7, Amazon Kindle software, the New York Times web site and a QuickTime video in direct sunlight. Shades of gray and some color tints are visible. Besides the XOs and e-ink based Kindle ereaders, no other color screen device I own can be seen as clearly in sunlight. Not even the famed iPad. In the video, you can see that at a certain angle where line of sight and sun are aligned, the new Pixel Qi screen glows as if backlit!""

Transportation

Submission + - Should Cities Install Moving Sidewalks?

theodp writes: 'The real problem nowadays is how to move crowds,' said the manager of the failed Trottoir Roulant Rapide high-speed (9 km/h) people mover project. 'They can travel fast over long distances with the TGV (high-speed train) or airplanes, but not over short distances (under 1 km).' Slate's Tom Vanderbilt explores whether moving walkways might be viable for urban transportation. The first moving sidewalks were unveiled at Chicago's 1893 Columbian Exposition, and at one point seemed destined to supplant some subways, but never took root in cities for a variety of reasons. Vanderbilt turns to science fiction for inspiration, where 30 mph walkways put today's tortoise-like speed ranges of .5-.83 m/s to shame. In the meantime, Jerry Seinfeld will just have to learn to live with 'the people who get onto the moving walkway and just stand there. Like it's a ride.'
Businesses

Submission + - Tech Startups Aren't the Answer to US Job Creation

Hugh Pickens writes: "Andy Grove, co-founder and former CEO of Intel, has an interesting op-ed in Bloomberg where he debunks the idea that startups are the key to job creation in the United States and explains why the great Silicon Valley innovation machine hasn’t been creating many jobs lately. According to Grove startups are a wonderful thing, but as much as Americans love the idea of two guys in the garage inventing something that changes the world, startups cannot by themselves increase tech employment. "Equally important is what comes after that mythical moment of creation in the garage, as technology goes from prototype to mass production," writes Grove. "This is the phase where companies scale up. They work out design details, figure out how to make things affordably, build factories, and hire people by the thousands. Scaling is hard work but necessary to make innovation matter." Grove says that the US has forgotten that scaling was crucial to its economic future and that abandoning “commodity” manufacturing like tv sets, lithium-ion batteries, and memory chips to foreign manufacturers have locked the US out of tomorrow’s emerging industries. The solution says Grove is to levy an extra tax on the products of offshored labor and develop a system of financial incentives including creating a "Scaling Bank" that would make funds available to companies that will scale their American operations. "Such a system would be a daily reminder that while pursuing our company goals, all of us in business have a responsibility to maintain the industrial base on which we depend and the society whose adaptability — and stability — we may have taken for granted. ""
Transportation

Submission + - Charge an Electric Car Faster Than a Gas Car? (allcarselectric.com)

thecarchik writes: Japanese based JFE Engineering has released its ultra-fast charge station. Designed to comply with the CHAdeMo standard developed by Tokyo Electric Power Company, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Toyota, the system is capable of charging a 2011 Mistubishi i-Miev from empty to 50% full in just three minutes. Even just three minutes plugged into the fast-charge station was enough to enable a standard 2011 Mitsubishi i-Miev to travel a further 50 miles before further charging was required.
Movies

Why Movies Are Not Exactly Like Music 378

Ars digs into the proposition that movies will go the way of the music business, and finds some reasons not to be totally gloomy about Hollywood's immediate future. For one thing, the movie biz managed to introduce a next-generation format to follow the DVD, a trick that eluded the music crowd (anyone remember DVD-Audio? SACD?). Blu-ray isn't making up the gap as DVD sales fall, but it is slowing the revenue decline. Perhaps the most important difference from the music business is that movies aren't amenable to "disaggregation" — unlike CDs, which people stopped buying once they could get the individual songs they really wanted. Ars concludes: "The movie business is facing many of the same challenges that are bedeviling music, but it's not about to go quietly into that good night — and it may not have to."

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