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Submission + - SPAM: Bastille Day Terrorist Attacks in Nice, France. 84 Dead 1

MrKaos writes: Videos are emerging of another terrorist attack in Nice France. Police failed to stop the driver of a fixed axle lorry who sebsequently used the vehicle to plough through crowds of people celebrating Bastille day.
Claims are emerging that the driver was also using an automatic weapon and had a stock of grenades. France was still in a state of emergency from the previous terrorist attacks.

Eighty four are dead and eighteen are in a critical condition.

The cowardly Daesh (ISIS) have claimed responsibility for the attack against the citizens of France.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - 60 people killed and many more injured in terrorist attack in Nice, France (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A truck slowly drove towards a crowd, accelerated and then hit people on the famous Promenade des Anglais shortly after celebratory fireworks had ended. July 14th is a national holiday in remembrance of the attack on the Bastille which started the French Revolution. The truck reportedly drove more than a mile before the driver was shot and the truck stopped.
Open Source

Submission + - Red Hat Fights Patent Troll With GPL (itworld.com)

jfruh writes: "Red Hat is in the middle of a patent lawsuit with Twin Peaks Software, which claims that a Red Hat subsidiary is abusing a Twin Peaks filesystem lawsuit. Now, Red Hat is launching an intriguing countermeasure: the company claims that Twin Peaks' own closed source software violates the GPL because it makes use of an open source disk utility that Red Hat holds the copyright no. Is this a smart move on Red Hat's part?"
Science

Submission + - Sexually-Rejected Flies Booze Way Harder Than Their Hunky Peers (vice.com)

derekmead writes: "How’s this for hilariously depressing: male fruit flies who have their sexual advances rejected drink alcohol far more heavily than males who are regularly having sex.

Yes, you read that right. New research from a team at UC San Francisco has discovered that a tiny molecule in flies’ brains, called neuropeptide F, acts as a link between sexual rejection and excessive drinking. A similar molecule, neuropeptide Y, exists in humans, and as such the research helps shed light on what triggers human addiction."

Submission + - Mammal Successful Before Dinosaur Extinction (canada.com)

eternaldoctorwho writes: New evidence has been uncovered that suggests mammals were widely successful at least 20 million years before dinosaurs went extinct in the K-T asteroid impact. A recently published study in Nature by paleontologist Greg Wilson of the University of Washington reveals that multituberculates (a class of mice-like mammals named for the shape of their teeth) became abundant at the same time as the rise of flowering plants. So what did finally wipe out this now-extinct class of "multis"? University of Chicago paleontologist Zhe-Xi Luo has the answer, "You could say multituberculates were a good match against the dinosaurs, but they were no match for the rodents."
Medicine

Submission + - Thousands of side-effects from mixing meds revealed (nature.com)

ananyo writes: An algorithm designed by US scientists to trawl through a plethora of drug interactions has yielded thousands of previously unknown side effects caused by taking drugs in combination (http://www.nature.com/news/drug-data-reveal-sneaky-side-effects-1.10220). The work provides a way to sort through the hundreds of thousands of 'adverse events' reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) each year.
The researchers developed an algorithm that would match data from each drug-exposed patient to a nonexposed control patient with the same condition. The approach automatically corrected for several known sources of bias, including those linked to gender, age and disease.
The team then used this method to compile a database of 1,332 drugs and possible side effects that were not listed on the labels for those drugs. The algorithm came up with an average of 329 previously unknown adverse events for each drug — far surpassing the average of 69 side effects listed on most drug labels.

Amiga

Submission + - What will the upcoming C64 / Amiga reboot change? (commodoreusa.net) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Commodore USA is close to starting production of the new C64s and Amigas it has been designing around modern PC hardware. A new OS nobody has seen yet — Commodore OS 1.0 — is also in the works. COS will, amongst other things, allow "games for the Commodore PET, Vic20, C16, C64, C128 and AMIGA" to be played on the new machines in emulation mode. It also promises "a distinctive, attractive, advanced and stable operating system experience".

Will these machines only interest a few hundred thousand people who grew up with a C64 or Amiga at home and are feeling nostalgic? Or could the new machines become wildly popular, sell millions of units just like in the old days and possibly signify a true "return" or "resurrection" of the long extinct "Commodore Platform"? Could this "old-new" platform possibly then become a popular 4th choice for people who want neither a Windows PC, nor a Mac, nor a Linux box? Could the new Amiga lineup in particular, which features fairly powerful hardware, become a renewed magnet for cool audio, video, 2D/3D graphics, music apps and other creative software like the old Amiga was? Will we walk into game shops and see dedicated "Amiga Games" again?

Red Hat Software

Submission + - Linux Gets Dynamic Firewalls in Fedora 15 (esecurityplanet.com)

darthcamaro writes: Linux users have long relied on iptables for in-distro firewall setup. The upcoming Fedora 15 release changes that and introduces us to new dynamic firewall technology.

"Most Linux systems use IP tables type firewalls and the problem is that if you want to make a change to the firewall, it's hard to modify on the fly without reloading the entire firewall," Fedora Project Leader, Jared Smith said. "Fedora 15 is really the first mainstream operating system to have a dynamic firewall where you can add or change rules and keep the firewall up and responding while you're making changing."


Crime

Submission + - 16-Year-Old Killed His Own Mother Over PlayStation (gamersleak.com) 1

Gamersleak writes: Kendall Anderson is a 5-foot-8 teenager from Philadelphia, his mother Rashida Anderson took away his PlayStation for bad behaviour the day after Thanksgiving. They had a 90 minute argument about the happening. After the argument, Kendall was very upset and pondered for three hour on whether or not to kill his mom. Later that night, Kendall entered his sleeping mother’s bedroom and hit her 20 times with a claw hammer.
Microsoft

Submission + - New SMB Bug in All Versions of Windows (threatpost.com) 2

Trailrunner7 writes: Researchers have identified a new remotely exploitable vulnerability in all current versions of Windows that could be used by attackers to run arbitrary code on vulnerable machines. There is already a proof-of-concept exploit in circulation for the bug.

The new bug lies in the BROWSER protocol, which runs on top of the SMB (Server Message Block) protocol on Windows. Microsoft security officials said that the vulnerability is most likely to be found on servers, but that all current versions are vulnerable.

Submission + - GNU/Linux is fastest growing OS at Big Companies. (linuxfoundation.org) 1

twitter writes: A survey of 1,900 people at companies with more than 500 employees shows that GNU/Linux is growing faster than other OS at the expense of Windows and Unix. Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols has some insightful commentary on it.

These businesses are moving to Linux far faster than they are to Windows or Unix. ... conventional wisdom is that Unix users are the most likely to switch to Linux. ... it turns out that, by a few percentage points, Windows users at 36.6% are more likely to be heading to Linux than Unix, 31.4% ... 36.4% of businesses reported some Linux desktop use in their company. ... while total cost of ownership (TCO) remains a strong number two, the first reason these days for people to switch to Linux is its perceived technical superiority and features. ... 58.6%, said the recession hadn't played a role.

One thing that SJVN missed is that, "and 66% of users surveyed say that their Linux deployments are brand new (“greenfield”) deployments. This greenfield market share grab is a good indicator of a platform’s future performance." Hurry up, already, I want my GNU!

Botnet

Submission + - Should ISPs cut off bot-infected users? (computerworld.com) 1

richi writes: "There's no doubt that botnets are a major threat to the safety and stability of the internet — not to mention the cleanliness of your inbox. After years of failure to act, could we finally be seeing ISPs waking up to their responsibilities? While ISPs can't prevent users getting infected with bots, they are in a superb position to detect the signs of infection. Contractually, the ISP would be reasonably justified in cutting off a user from the internet, as bot infection would be contrary to the terms of the ISP's acceptable-use policy.

However, the main counter-argument is that consumer ISPs operate on razor-thin margins. Perhaps there's light at the end of the tunnel. After last week's news that Comcast is warning customers found to be infected, today, Microsoft's Scott Charney spoke at the International Security Solutions Europe Conference in Berlin, Germany, advocating bot detection and remediation.

Is this an idea who's time has come?"

Security

Submission + - Closing Gmail's Backdoors (threatpost.com)

chicksdaddy writes: Google says owners of compromised Gmail accounts should change their password. But Web security expert Caleb Sima says that advice is woefully inadequate. In this article for Threatpost.com, Sima goes through the steps of securing a compromised account against being re-owned: spotting tricks and tools that attackers will use to monitor your email and get back in even after you've changed your password.
Games

Submission + - Lost online games from the pre-Web era (pcmag.com)

harrymcc writes: Long before the Web came along, people were playing online games--on BBSes, on services such as Prodigy and CompuServe, and elsewhere. Gaming historian Benj Edwards has rounded up a dozen RPGs, MUDs, and other fascinating curiosities from the 1970s, 1980s, and early 1990s--and the cool part is, they're all playable on the Web today.

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