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Submission + - FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler Says Switching ISPs Is Too Hard 1

Jason Koebler writes: Did you hear about those Comcast service calls from hell that have been cropping up over the last couple months? So did FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, who said today that switching internet service providers is too damn hard, in part because ISPs have grown used to having a monopoly on broadband services.
"Once consumers choose a broadband provider, they face high switching costs that include early-termination fees and equipment rental fees," Wheeler said in a speech today. Wheeler didn't specifically say what the FCC will do (if anything) to change that, but said the answer is to help facilitate more true competition: "If those disincentives to competition weren’t enough, the media is full of stories of consumers’ struggles to get ISPs to allow them to drop service."

Submission + - Steve Ballmer Wrote the Text for Blue Screen of Death 1

jones_supa writes: Neowin reports that Microsoft's former CEO, Steve Ballmer, is actually credited with writing the original Blue Screen of Death text for Windows 3.1. In a new MSDN's The Old New Thing blog post penned a few days back, Ballmer is given credit for rewriting the text that appears on the infamous BSOD that we all know and love.

During this time period, Steve Ballmer was head of the Systems Division, and he paid a visit to the Windows team to see what they were up to, as is the wont of many executives. When they showed him the Ctrl+Alt+Del feature, he nodded thoughtfully and added, "This is nice, but I don't like the text of the message. It doesn't sound right to me."

Ballmer went back to his office, changed the text and e-mailed it back to the team a few days later; the rest is history. Steve's idea for what the screen should say was so good that the text went directly into Windows very close to its original form.
Data Storage

Distinguishing Encrypted Data From Random Data? 467

gust5av writes "I'm working on a little script to provide very simple and easy to use steganography. I'm using bash together with cryptsetup (without LUKS), and the plausible deniability lies in writing to different parts of a container file. On decryption you specify the offset of the hidden data. Together with a dynamically expanding filesystem, this makes it possible to have an arbitrary number of hidden volumes in a file. It is implausible to reveal the encrypted data without the password, but is it possible to prove there is encrypted data where you claim there's not? If I give someone one file containing random data and another containing data encrypted with AES, will he be able to tell which is which?"
Australia

'Throttling' Broadband Provider Sued In Australia 130

destinyland writes "Optus has been severely throttling users who exceed a download quota, according to ZDNet — down from 100Mbps to 64Kbps — and it's drawn attention from federal regulators. Optus's ad campaign promises 'supersonic' speeds, and one technology blog notes that the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission 'isn't happy about Optus' sensationalist claims, which it's sure breaches the Trade Practices Act.' Australia's trade commission called the practice 'misleading or deceptive,' and the broadband provider now has a date in court next month, the second one since a June hearing over 'unlimited' voice and data plans that actually had usage caps."

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