Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Node.js competition is getting strong! (

koper writes: The growing popularity of Node.js and Opa, which unify client and server-side coding, is a clear indication that the Web of today is too complex, and the programming model needs to be refined and simplified. While Node.js is an inventive framework based on an existing, popular language (JavaScript), Opa has a lot to offer for those willing to invest time in learning a new language. I hope you will explore these languages further.

Submission + - Web apps programming made easy. (

koper writes: "The new programming language Opa makes web programming easier by providing a one-tier one-language-for-everything approach. Now it goes one step further by providing a (very-minimalistic for now) web-based IDE that allows to compile & deploy Opa programs in one click in your web browser. Give it a spin!"

Submission + - Opa: new web development platform (

koper writes: "Opa is a new generation of web development platform. It is a new programming language, a new web server, a new database and a new distributed execution engine, all of them tightly integrated to provide a great experience for web developers. Few days ago it became open-source.

Why should you care about yet another language? There are few things that make Opa stand out from the crowd:
  • it's a language targeted at the web;
  • it puts lots of emphasis on security;
  • it's a one-stop solution; you write in Opa and it generates for you: the client-side code (JavaScript), database queries, all the glue code etc.
  • scalability won't be a problem: your app is distributed and cloud-ready right from the start.

Curious? Sounds too good to be true? Check out Opa's homepage or my blog for more info.

Disclaimer: I am working on Opa at MLstate."

Slashdot Top Deals

Steve Jobs said two years ago that X is brain-damaged and it will be gone in two years. He was half right. -- Dennis Ritchie