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Submission + - Electric car owner charged and jailed with stealing 5 cents worth of juice (11alive.com)

Joe_Dragon writes: http://www.11alive.com/news/article/314666/40/Electric-car-owner-charged-with-stealing-5-cents-worth-of-juice

CHAMBLEE, Ga. — One Saturday in November, Kaveh Kamooneh drove his Nissan Leaf to Chamblee Middle School, where his 11-year-old son was playing tennis.

Kamooneh had taken the liberty of charging the electric car with an exterior outlet at the school. Within minutes of plugging in the car, he says a Chamblee police officer appeared.

"He said that he was going to charge me with theft by taking because I was taking power, electricity from the school," Kamooneh said.

Kamooneh says he had charged his car for 20 minutes, drawing about a nickel's worth of juice. Don Francis of Clean Cities Atlanta, an electric vehicle advocacy group, says the estimate of 5 cents is accurate.

"I'm not sure how much electricity he stole," said Chamblee police Sergeant Ernesto Ford, but he added: It doesn't matter. "He broke the law. He stole something that wasn't his."

Sgt. Ford says the officer should have arrested Kamooneh on the spot. But he didn't. Instead, the officer filed a police report. Then 11 days passed, and two deputies showed up at his house in Decatur.

"They arrested me here at about eight o'clock at night," Kamooneh said.

Ford said he sought the arrest warrant after determining that school officials hadn't given Kamooneh permission to plug in his car. Ford said Chamblee Police did so without asking school officials if they wanted to prosecute the alleged theft of electricity. A DeKalb Schools spokesman did not respond to a request for comment.

Records show Kamooneh spent more than 15 hours in the DeKalb County Jail for plugging his car into a school's electrical outlet.

Kamooneh acknowledges he hadn't asked permission first. "When I got there, there was nobody there. It was a Saturday morning," he said.

"A theft is a theft," Sgt. Ford said. When asked if he'd make the arrest again, he answered: "Absolutely."

                                                                                                              ----------------------------

A 11 days later? and what about people who plug in phones / laptops? Will we start hulling them off to jail as well? What about homeless people who may do this just to get into jail?

Also what about at the airport lot's of people plug in there and lot's of airports are city / local government owned will they track you down and use extradition to have you come back? put out an warrant?

This seems like overkill and that is having the cop come to your door (much less the jail part) when a letter / ticket works better.

Submission + - DisplayPort 1.3 Specifies 8k Video (brightsideofnews.com)

kelemvor4 writes: Reportedly the preliminary displayport 1.3 specs are in. With support for 8K video at 30fps, 4k video at 60fps it looks like things will be nice and crisp on displays of the not so distant future. That's a whopping 7680 × 4320 (33.1 megapixels) at 30fps!
Supercomputing

Submission + - Cray Unveils 100 Petaflops XC30 Supercomputer (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Cray has unveiled its supercomputing beast – the XC30, which is capable of achieving over 100 petaflops performance thereby putting not only the Titan but, also China’s Tianhe-2 in the shade. Previously codenamed “Cascade” and based on the new Aries interconnect architecture, the XC30 has been developed in conjunction with DARPA. The supercomputer can scale up to a million cores and uses Intel Xeon E5-2600 processors for now. Cray has revealed that it will equip the future version of the XC30 with Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors along with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs.

Submission + - Smart Automotive Headlight for Seeing Through Rain and Snow (cmu.edu)

kelemvor4 writes: Standard vehicle headlights improve driver visibility at night by illuminating the road and the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, they also illuminate raindrops and snowflakes making them appear as bright flickering streaks that are distracting to the driver. We propose a headlight capable of avoiding precipitation to improve driver visibility while adequately illuminating the road. This reduces driver stress and makes roads more safe during rain and snow storms. We have conducted simulations and built a prototype system to show that the approach is feasible and effective. Demonstration of the prototype system with an artificial rain drop generator is encouraging making the falling rain disappear in front of the observer.

A write-up on the subject is available here: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~ILIM/publications/PDFs/DTBRKN-ICCP12.pdf

Firefox

Submission + - Telefonica Shows Prototype Firefox OS Phone (techweekeurope.co.uk)

judgecorp writes: "Telefonica has added some detail to the Firefox OS picture, following the announcement of phones by two manufacturers earlier this week. The Qualcomm built handset shown by Telefonica in London ran the HTML5 OS and showed multitasking as well as a range of HTML5 applications. Firefox-maker Mozilla receives a lot of funding from Google, but Telefonica sees Firefox OS as a way to achieve independence from Google. It will be more open than Android, and will run on lower-specification hardware, according to the company's director of products."
Hardware

Submission + - Supercomputer predicts revolution (bbc.co.uk)

kelemvor4 writes: A study, based on millions of articles, charted deteriorating national sentiment ahead of the recent revolutions in Libya and Egypt.

While the analysis was carried out retrospectively, scientists say the same processes could be used to anticipate upcoming conflict.

The system also picked up early clues about Osama Bin Laden's location.

Submission + - Photography rights in the U.S. (aclu.org)

A Commentor writes: "With law enforcement harassing photographers, the ACLU has provided information on photographer's rights in the U.S.: Taking photographs of things that are plainly visible from public spaces is a constitutional right – and that includes federal buildings, transportation facilities, and police and other government officials carrying out their duties. Unfortunately, there is a widespread, continuing pattern of law enforcement officers ordering people to stop taking photographs from public places, and harassing, detaining and arresting those who fail to comply."
Privacy

Submission + - EA's Origin may be a little too intrusive (decryptedtech.com) 2

kelemvor4 writes: One of the most intrusive EULA agreements I've seen to date is that of EA's ORIGIN:
“We or third parties operating the advertisement serving technology may use demographic information such as age and gender as well as information logged from your hardware or device to ensure that appropriate advertising is presented within the site, online or mobile product or service and to calculate or control the number of unique and repeat views of a given ad, and/or deliver ads that relate to your interests and measure the effectiveness of ad campaigns. We or third parties may log data for this purpose including IP address (including for purposes of determining your approximate geographic location), unique device I.D., information about your software, applications and hardware, browser information (and/or information passed via your browser), hardware, machine or device make and model, advertisement(s) served, in game location, length of time an advertisement was visible, other Internet and website usage information, web pages and mobile internet sites which have been viewed by you (as well as date and time), domain type, size of the advertisement, advertisement response (if any), and angle of view. The foregoing data may be used and disclosed per this policy and the privacy policy of the company providing the ad serving technology and to other third parties in a form that does not personally identify you.”

Security

Submission + - Defcon Hacks Defeat Card-And-Code Locks In Seconds (forbes.com) 1

Sparrowvsrevolution writes: At the Defcon security conference in Las Vegas, Marc Weber Tobias and Toby Bluzmanis plan to demonstrate simple hardware hacks that expose critical security problems in Swiss lock firm Kaba’s E-plex 5800 and its older 5000. Kaba markets the 5800 lock, which Bluzmmanis says can cost as much as $1,300, as the first to integrate code-based access controls with a new Department of Homeland Security standard that goes into effect next year and requires identifying credentials be used in secure facilities to control access. One attack uses a mallet to "rap" open the lock, another opens the lock by putting a pin through the LED display light to ground a contact on the circuit board, and a third uses a wire inserted in the lock's back panel to hit a switch that resets its software.

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