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Submission + - Romney-Ryan Space Policy Fails to Impress

RocketAcademy writes: "The Romney-Ryan campaign has released a white paper on space policy, which observers find to be long on criticisms of the Obama Administration but short on specific recommendations.

The policy promises "a robust role for commercial space," but it's clearly a supporting role: "NASA will set the goals and lead the way in human space exploration."

When it comes to space, both parties put government ahead of private enterprise. Some see a parallel with the policies which are driving space companies out of California.

Newt Gingrich, one of the few politicians who thinks seriously about space, says the policy is a step in the right direction but not enough."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Microsoft Security Essentials

horsecat writes: "What is your opinion — Microsoft Security Essentials vs Avast Pro in a network environment on local workstations? I have users who think we could do away with Avast Pro and only use Microsoft Security Essentials for security scanning — any opinions?"

Submission + - Why Apple intentionally sacrificed Maps quality in iOS 6 (

colinneagle writes: Every time an iOS 6 user changes location, Apple will remind its loyal user of the inadequacy of iOS 6 Maps. This tradeoff between an excellent user experience and proprietary control of location was made because of the value of location data to advertisers. Apple wants to monetize this data for itself rather than give Google the opportunity.

Location data is valuable, especially if the user opts in to being tracked. Apple’s ad network iAd will know if a user passes certain stores, dines at specific restaurants and plays tennis. This type of data helps an advertiser increase the relevancy of the ads it serves, creating more value.

If the Google Maps for iOS 6 app does come to fruition, then this approach begs one question: how much user data could Apple gather if none of its users run its app?

Submission + - CERN to announce discovery of new particle (

djacosta writes: "The physics community is abuzz with the latest news that CERN researchers in Switzerland plan to announce the discovery of the Higgs boson on July 4.
But it looks like someone jumped the gun.
A video confirming the discovering of the new particle was accidentally posted on CERN's website for a brief time this morning, Tom Chivers of The Telegraph reports.
In the video, Joe Incandela, the CMS spokesperson says:
We've observed a new particle. We have quite strong evidence that there's something there. Its properties are still going to take us a little bit of time. But we can see that it decays to two photons, for example, which tells us it's a boson, it's a particle with integer spin. And we know its mass is roughly 100 times the mass of the proton. And this is very significant. This is the most massive such particle that exists, if we confirm all of this, which I think we will."


Submission + - Scientists Invent Particles That Will Let You Live Without Breathing (

An anonymous reader writes: The invention, developed by a team at Boston Children's Hospital, will allow medical teams to keep patients alive and well for 15 to 30 minutes despite major respiratory failure. This is enough time for doctors and emergency personnel to act without risking a heart attack or permanent brain injuries in the patient.

Submission + - Google's Neural Network Teaches Itself to Recognize Cats ( 1

fatherjoecode writes: "I thought this was so cool:

Google scientists created one of the largest neural networks for machine learning by connecting 16,000 computer processors, which they turned loose on the Internet to learn on its own.

Presented with 10 million digital images found in YouTube videos, what did Google’s brain do? What millions of humans do with YouTube: looked for cats.

The neural network taught itself to recognize cats, which is actually no frivolous activity. This week the researchers will present the results of their work at a conference in Edinburgh, Scotland. The Google scientists and programmers will note that while it is hardly news that the Internet is full of cat videos, the simulation nevertheless surprised them. It performed far better than any previous effort by roughly doubling its accuracy in recognizing objects in a challenging list of 20,000 distinct items.

It's not just humans that are looking at cat videos."


Submission + - 'Asian Brown Cloud' Threatens U.S. ( 1

sciencehabit writes: China and India are some of the world's top polluters, with countless cars, factories, and households belching more than 2 million metric tons of carbon soot and other dark pollutants into the air every year. The pall hanging over the region has come to be known as "the Asian brown cloud." These pollutants aren't just bad news for the countries themselves. A new study reveals that they can affect climate thousands of kilometers away, warming the United States by up to 0.4C by 2024, while cooling other regions.
The Military

Submission + - Military surplus a bonanza for law enforcement (

k6mfw writes: from the article: "San Francisco may be known for antiwar movements and peace rallies, but when local law enforcement agencies needed help with supplies, they've turned to the U.S. military."
"A total of 163,344 new and used items valued at $26.2 million — from bath mats acquired by the sheriff of Sonoma County to a full-tracked tank for rural San Joaquin County — were transferred last year to state and local agencies."


Submission + - LFTR in 5 Minutes or, Why aren't we using Thorium for nuclear power? ( 2

Lorien_the_first_one writes: Seems that this video is going viral. The video points out all the advantages of Thorium as nuclear fuel over Uranium: lower cost, the reactor shuts itself down when damage occurs, the waste is much easier to handle and contain, and Thorium is far more abundant than Uranium. So why aren't we using Thorium for nuclear power instead of Uranium?

Submission + - Huawei NZ almost certainly a front for Chinese intelligence - defence analyst (

politkal writes: "Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei — involved in a $1.35 billion Ultrafast Broadband project in New Zealand — is almost certainly a front for Chinese intelligence, a defence analyst claims.
That's the collective view of the security community in the US, Britain and Australia, according to Auckland-based defence analyst Paul Buchanan, who says it would be prudent for Prime Minister John Key to listen to them." Secondary source:


Submission + - Aerial robots -- quadrotors -- play James Bond theme (

alphadogg writes: Vijay Kumar, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering & Applied Sciences, impressed this week with a TED2012 conference show-and-tell presentation featuring quadrotors, flying robots that swarm and work together as first responders, to transport cargo, to do construction jobs, to survey disasters and more. Kumar says because the aerial robots from his lab are so small, they can be much more agile than typically large unmanned aircraft. They can even play musical instruments, as shown in one of the stranger music videos you'll ever see — featuring the James Bond theme.

Submission + - Has the Higgs Been Discovered? Physicists Gear Up (

An anonymous reader writes: The physics buzz reached a frenzy in the past few days over the announcement that the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva is planning to release what is widely expected to be tantalizing although not conclusive evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson, the elementary particle hypothesized to be the origin of the mass of all matter.

Many physicists have already swung into action, swapping rumors about the contents of the announcement and proposing grand ideas about what those rumors would mean, if true. "It's impossible to be excited enough," says Gordon Kane, a theoretical physicist at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.


Submission + - StackOverflow's Programming Language Bias (

AlexDomo writes: Suprisingly, JavaScript came out to be the most "over-represented" language on StackOverflow, by quite a long way at 294%. Could this also be because programming JavaScript is generally quite difficult and will result in people seeking help more often? Following this was C# (which I had expected to be number 1), at 153%. After this, PHP, Ruby and Python were basically fairly balanced at around 100%. The most "under-represented" major language would definitely be C at 11%. Three other major languages which seemed to be a bit under-represented, below 50%, were C++, Java and Objective-C.

For details of the method used and the full results, refer to the original article here.

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