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Submission + - Seymour Cray and the Development of Supercomputers (

An anonymous reader writes: Linux Voice has a nice retrospective of the development of the Cray supercomputer. Quoting: "Firstly, within the CPU, there were multiple functional units (execution units forming discrete parts of the CPU) which could operate in parallel; so it could begin the next instruction while still computing the current one, as long as the current one wasn’t required by the next. It also had an instruction cache of sorts to reduce the time the CPU spent waiting for the next instruction fetch result. Secondly, the CPU itself contained 10 parallel functional units (parallel processors, or PPs), so it could operate on ten different instructions simultaneously. This was unique for the time." They also discuss modern efforts to emulate the old Crays: "...what Chris wanted was real Cray-1 software: specifically, COS. Turns out, no one has it. He managed to track down a couple of disk packs (vast 10lb ones), but then had to get something to read them in the end he used an impressive home-brew robot solution to map the information, but that still left deciphering it. A Norwegian coder, Yngve Ådlandsvik, managed to play with the data set enough to figure out the data format and other bits and pieces, and wrote a data recovery script."

Submission + - A road trip into the Free Software Foundation's early days (

An anonymous reader writes: In an article on,Jonas Öberg, executive director of the Free Software Foundation Europe, recounts a road trip to the 1999 Bazaar in New York City with Richard Stallman:

Now, as interesting as it was to be at MIT, it wasn't the main reason for my trip. In November 1999, Tim Ney, then executive director of the FSF, asked me if I was going to be at The Bazaar in December. The FSF was going to hand out the 1999 Free Software Award, and going to the ceremony was something I had wanted to do for a long time. So, I made the trip, first stopping in Boston.


Submission + - Updates Make Windows 7 and 8 Spy On You Like Windows 10 ( 1

schwit1 writes: Windows 10 has been launched and already installed on more than 50 million computers worldwide. It is now a known fact that Windows 10 user data is being sent back to Microsoft servers back in Redmond, Washington. Well, now new updates that are being deployed to all Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 machines will turn their computers into a big piece of spyware, just like their predecessor, Windows 10.

Submission + - Linus Torvalds says Security is never going to be perfect (

sfcrazy writes: Linus Torvalds made a surprise appearance for a Keynote discussion at LinuxCon 2015. He talked about many topics, including security. Linus said security in most cases is bugs which are exploited by some clever person. But can we get rid of bugs, and as a result security holes? So can Linux get rid of such bugs? Not realistically. It’s just impossible to write any software free of bugs. The thing is to catch them as soon as you can. “The thing is, you are never going to get rid of bugs,” Linus said. It’s also hard to know ahead of time that the bug in your software can be a security issue. And he’s absolutely right. “If you think of it that way, then you just know that bugs are inevitable; security is never going to be perfect,” he added

Submission + - Evaluating The Security Of Open Source Software

An anonymous reader writes: The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project managed by The Linux Foundation, is developing a new free Badge Program, seeking input from the open source community on the criteria to be used to determine security, quality and stability of open source software. The first draft of the criteria is available on GitHub and is spearheaded by David A. Wheeler, an open source and security research expert who works for the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and is also coordinating the CII's Census Project, and Dan Kohn, a senior adviser on the CII.

Submission + - Linus Torvalds: Security Will Never Be Perfect (

jfruh writes: Linus Torvalds was a surprise speaker at this year's LinuxCon, and in a typically provocative speech, he declared that chasing after perfect security will always fail. Instead, he touted the open source model, which he said led to bugs and security holes in production environments being fixed as quickly as possible.

Submission + - The Free Software Foundation's statement on Canonical's updated licensing terms (

donaldrobertson writes: "On July 15th, 2015, the Free Software Foundation's Licensing and Compliance Lab, along with the Software Freedom Conservancy, announces that, after two years of negotiations, Canonical, Ltd. has published an update to the licensing terms of Ubuntu GNU/Linux.

This update now makes Canonical's policy unequivocally comply with the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) and other free software licenses. It does this by adding a "trump clause" that prevails in all situations possibly covered by the policy:"

Submission + - A 'Star Trek' Economic System May Be Closer Than You Think writes: Anna North writes about “Star Trek’”s “post-economic” system, in which money no longer exists and anything you want can be made in a replicator, essentially for free. According to Manu Saadia, the author of “Trekonomics,” a forthcoming book about the economics of the “Star Trek” universe, when everything is free objects will no longer be status symbols. Success will be measured in achievements, not in money: “"Instead of working to become more wealthy, you work to increase your reputation," says Saadia. "You work to increase your prestige. You want to be the best captain or the best scientist in the entire galaxy. And many other people are working to do that, as well. It's very meritocratic"

In a time of rising inequality and stagnating wages, a world where everyone’s needs are met and people only work if they feel like it seems pretty far away but a post-scarcity economy is actually far more within reach than the technological advances for which “Star Trek” is better known. If productivity growth continues, Saadia believes there will be much more wealth to go around in a few hundred years’ time. In general, society might look more like present-day New Zealand, which he sees as less work-obsessed than the United States: “You work to live rather than the other way round.” Wealthy retirees today also already live an essentially post-money existence, “traveling and exploring and deepening their understanding of the world and being generally happy.” According to Saadia we're beginning to get a few hints of what the post-money, reputation-based economy might look like. "If you look at things like Instagram, Vine, places where people put a huge amount of work into basically just gaining a certain amount of reputation, it's fascinating to see. Or even Wikipedia, for that matter. The Internet has begun to give us a hint of how much people will work, for no money, just for reputation."

Submission + - Linux Foundation's Census Project Ranks Software At Risk

jones_supa writes: The Core Infrastructure Initiative, a Linux Foundation effort assembled in the wake of the Heartbleed fiasco to provide development support for key Internet protocols, has opened the doors on its Census Project — an effort to figure out what software projects need support now, instead of waiting for them to break. Census assembles metrics about open source projects found in Debian's package list and on, and then scores them based on the amount of risk each presents. Risk scores are an aggregate of multiple factors: how many people are known to have contributed to the project in the last 12 months, how many CVEs have been filed for it, how widely used it is, and how much exposure it has to the network. According to the current iteration of the survey, the programs most in need of attention are not previously cited infrastructure projects, but common core Linux system utilities that have network access and little development activity around them.

Submission + - New optimizations for X86 in upcoming GCC 5.0: PIC in 32 bit mode. (

An anonymous reader writes: PIC in 32 bit mode is used to build Android applications, Linux libraries and many other products. Thus GCC performance in that case is very important ..

EBX is returned to an allocation making all 7 registers available. This boosts applications with hot integer loops suffering from register pressure. Below are results for a stress test with high register pressure in integer loop.

Submission + - Why Not Utopia? Mark Bittman on basic income and increasing automation (

Paul Fernhout writes: Mark Bittman wrote an op-ed in the New York Times suggesting a basic income as a solution to increasing automation leading to job loss. He concludes: "We have achieved a level of social equality barely imagined by progressives 50 years ago, but economic equality has gotten much worse. No one knows what the world will look like in 50 years, but if we resign ourselves to dystopia — in which capital has full control, as it nearly does now — we'll surely have one. Let's resolve to build something better. In the long run we know that we'll make the transition from capitalism to some less destructive and hopefully more just system. Why not begin that transition now? If there is going to be a global market that will further enrich capitalists, there must be guarantees that the rest of the population can at least afford housing and food. And things can be even better than that: We'll have the robots work for us."

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