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Submission + - Adults Make Riskier, More Inconsistent Decisions As They Get Older, Study Finds (businessinsider.com.au)

schliz writes: People aged over 65 make poorer financial decisions and inconsistent choices than younger individuals with the same IQ, an international research group has found.

The study had 135 healthy participants aged 12-90 make a series of decisions: for example, choosing between gaining $5 and the chance to win $20 in a lottery. On average, over-65s earned 26-39% less than all other age groups, including adolescents — a finding that could partially explain their susceptibility to problem gambling and scams.

Submission + - Sinkhole Sucks Brains From Wasteful Bitcoing-Mining Botnet (techweekeurope.co.uk) 1

judgecorp writes: A sinkhole has taken a quarter of the bots out of the ZeroAcess botnet which was making money for its operators through click fraud and Bitcoin mining. This particular Bitcoin mining operation was only profitable through the use of stolen electricity — according to Symantec, which operated the sinkhole, ZeroAccess was using $561,000 of electricity a day on infected PCs, to generate about $2000 worth of Bitcoin/
NASA

Submission + - NASA and CSA Begin Testing Satellite Refueling on the ISS (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: NASA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have begun practicing satellite refueling in space on a test bed outside the International Space Station (ISS). In a series of tests that started on January 14 and are scheduled to continue until the 25th, the two space agencies are using the Robotic Refueling Module (RRM) and Canada’s Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator, or Dextre, robot to carry out simulated refueling operations. The purpose of these tests is to develop refueling methods aimed at extending the life of satellites and reducing the amount of space debris orbiting the Earth.
News

Submission + - Technologists See Biggest Salary Raise in a Decade (wallstreetandtech.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Technology salaries in the U.S. saw the biggest jump in 2012 in more than a decade, according to the latest salary survey from Dice, a career site for technology and engineer professionals.

Tech professionals in the financial industry — including capital markets, banking and insurance sectors — recorded an average 2012 salary of $93,599, up 3% compared to 2011.

Education

Submission + - Expulsion Exposes CS Departments Stuck in "Pre Internet Era" (securityledger.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Security Ledger writes that the expulsion of Ahmed Al-Khabaz, a 20 year-old computer sciences major at Dawson College in Montreal, has exposed a yawning culture gap between academic computer science programs and the contemporary marketplace for software engineering talent.

In an opinion piece in the Montreal Gazette on Tuesday, Dawson computer science professor Alex Simonelis said his department forbids hacking as an “extreme example” of “behavior that is unacceptable in a computing professional.” And, in a news conference on Tuesday, Dawson's administration stuck to that line, saying that Al-Khabaz's actions show he is "no longer suited for the profession."

In the meantime, Al-Khabaz has received more than one job offer from technology firms, including Skytech, the company that makes Omnivox.
Chris Wysopal, the CTO of Veracode, said that the incident shows that "most computer science departments are still living in the pre-Internet era when it comes to computer security." “Computer Science is taught in this idealized world separate from reality. They’re not dealing with the reality that software has to run in a hostile environment,” he said. Teaching students how to write applications without taking into account the hostile environment of the Internet is like teaching architects how to make buildings without taking into account environmental conditions like earthquakes, wind and rain, Wysopal said.

Java

Submission + - A close look at how Oracle installs deceptive software with Java updates | ZDNet (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Oracle's Java plugin for browsers is a notoriously insecure product. Over the past 18 months, the company has released 11 updates, six of them containing critical security fixes. With each update, Java actively tries to install unwanted software. Here's what it does, and why it has to stop.
Security

Submission + - SPAM: Electronic Article Surveillance Systems

femoransecurity writes: "Recently, a large retailer in Indianapolis was victim to a previously unknown way for a shoplifter to avoid the sensors when walking out of a store with tagged merchandise. Indiana security systems for retailers often rely on electronic article surveillance systems that would set off an alarm when a person walked past it."
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Samba Team Releases Samba 4.0 (samba.org)

dgharmon writes: As the culmination of ten years' work, the Samba Team has created the first compatible Free Software implementation of Microsoft’s Active Directory protocols. Familiar to all network administrators, the Active Directory protocols are the heart of modern directory service implementations. Samba 4.0 comprises an LDAP directory server, Heimdal Kerberos authentication server, a secure Dynamic DNS server, and implementations of all necessary remote procedure calls for Active Directory. Samba 4.0 provides everything needed to serve as an Active Directory Compatible Domain Controller for all versions of Microsoft Windows clients currently supported by Microsoft, including the recently released Windows 8.

The Samba 4.0 Active Directory Compatible Server provides support for features such as Group Policy, Roaming Profiles, Windows Administration tools and integrates with Microsoft Exchange and Free Software compatible services such as OpenChange.

The Samba 4.0 Active Directory Compatible Server can also be joined to an existing Microsoft Active Directory domain, and Microsoft Active Directory Domain Controllers can be joined to a Samba 4.0 Active Directory Compatible Server, showing true peer-to-peer interoperability of the Microsoft and Samba implementations of the Active Directory protocols.

Hardware

Submission + - 17-yo builds fusion reactor, keynotes Berlin's EHSM

lekernel writes: Will Jack is a 17 year old high school student from the US who enjoys nothing more than building nuclear fusion reactors in his basement. He will be the keynote speaker later this month at Berlin's Exceptionally Hard and Soft Meeting, a conference on the frontiers of open source and DIY. Other topics covered by the conference are the CERN open hardware initiative, microchip reverse-engineering, DIY vacuum tubes, and more.

Submission + - Overcoming Irrelevancy: Making Hyperlocal Actually Work!

THPN writes: I have never seen any organization get hyperlocal completely right. So, I wrote a simple algorithm that accurately derives the formal place name of any populated area in the United States. It works perfectly in the largest urban centers, as well as the most sparsely populated rural areas. One major site has already agreed to use it and best of all, it's in the public domain!
Google

Submission + - Legal fight over access to cell phone passwords (wsj.com)

dstates writes: The Wall Street Journal reports that Google is in a legal fight with the FBI over access to passwords that will unlock the data on a cell phone. Earlier this year Google refused to unlock an alleged pimp's Android cellphone even after the Federal Bureau of Investigation obtained a search warrant. The problem is that the FBI may have a warrant for a very specific piece of information, but once they have unrestricted access to a person's smartphone, they have access to information about vast swaths of the individual's life. Apple has taken a different strategy burning a unique encryption key into the silicon of each iPhone which neither Apple nor its suppliers retain. As a result, once someone makes 10 unsuccessful unlock attempts on an iPhone, the data is irretrievably gone.
Power

Submission + - Spinach Protein Boosts Efficiency of "Biohybrid" Solar Cells (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Popeye gets his strength from downing a can of spinach and what works for him also works for solar panels. Researchers at Vanderbilt University led by David Cliffel and Kane Jennings have come up with a way to dope silicon with a protein found in spinach to create a more efficient "biohybrid" solar cell that produces substantially more electrical current than previous efforts and may one day lead to cheaper, more efficient solar panels.
AI

Submission + - How To Breed A Face - Pareidoloop (i-programmer.info)

mikejuk writes: The genetic algorithm is a way to create solutions to problems by mimicking the way that nature works. However, that doesn't mean it can't be fun! Pareidoloop is a program which uses a GA approach to create a face that satisfies a face recognition algorithm — and all using JavaScript.
The program constructs some random polygons and then proceeds from generation to generation breeding new images. The measure of fitness in each generation is simply the score on the face detection program. Eventually the image evolves to look more and more like a face — sort of.
The overall result is spooky and its a demonstration of the power of evolution in just a few thousand generations.
You can try it for yourself at pareidoloop

NASA

Submission + - Rep. John Culberson, R-TX to propose NASA reform bill (examiner.com)

MarkWhittington writes: "Rep. John Culberson, R-TX, along with Rep. Frank Wolf, R-VA, is developing a bill that will attempt to rationalize NASA’s budget process and provide some long term continuality in its administration.

First, a NASA administrator would be named to a ten year term. The intent is to provide some continuality in the way the space agency is run and to remove it, as much as possible, from the vagaries of politics.

Second, NASA funding would be placed on a multi-year rather than annual cycle. This is of particular importance to the space agency because the majority of its high level projects take several years to run their course. If funding were fixed for a number of years, the theory goes, money could be spent more efficiently. NASA planners would know how much they have to spend four or so years going forward and would not have to worry about being cut off at the knees by Congressional appropriators year after year."

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