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Games

Submission + - Missile Command Record Beaten After 31 Years (geekyportal.com)

geekspy writes: Missile Command is a popular arcade game that was released in the 1980, it is also available for the Atari 2600 as well. The aim of this game is to save your base by shooting the incoming missiles from using a beam. In 1982 a player named Victor Ali has set a record score of 80,364,995 by playing the game for 56 hours. Guess what this record hasn't been broken for the last 31 years, but not anymore as a player from Sweden also named Victor (Victor Sandberg) beat the record by scoring a final score of 81,796,035. He played Mission Missile for 56 hours, 5 minutes, and 53 seconds on a single coin and also streamed it live.
The Courts

Submission + - Subpoenad for visting a news website? (azcentral.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A subpoena issued in Maricopa County, Arizona, requests the domain names and browsing history of everyone who ever went to the website of "The New Times" since Jan 1, 2004. Article excerpts follow:

The scope of the subpoena is unusually broad: It not only demands information from the reporters but also information about all the online readers of the publication since Jan. 1, 2004, including their Internet domain names and browsers and what other Web sites they visited before reading New Times.

Legal experts described the subpoena of New Times records and computer information as frightening, over-reaching and unconstitutional.

"It really is overbroad," said Kenneth Fields, a retired Superior Court judge. "And it touches on privacy issues of a lot of people who cannot be the subject of a grand-jury investigation. This is potentially thousands of people.

James Weinstein, professor of constitutional law at Arizona State University, called the subpoena "exquisitely overbroad" and "outrageous."

Weinstein said he has never seen or heard anything like the subpoena, which orders New Times to produce computer records of every person who has visited the New Times Web site in the past four years. "It has got to be unconstitutional," he said.

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1019newtimes1019.html

Censorship

Submission + - Govt. attacks paper; demands 4 years of reader IPs (phoenixnewtimes.com) 1

iroll writes: The founders of the Phoenix New Times have been arrested for exposing a "secret" grand jury subpoena targetting their newspaper. From the New Times article:

The subpoena demands: "Any and all documents containing a compilation of aggregate information about the Phoenix New Times Web site created or prepared from January 1, 2004 to the present, including but not limited to :
A) which pages visitors access or visit on the Phoenix New Times website;
B) the total number of visitors to the Phoenix New Times website;
C) information obtained from 'cookies,' including, but not limited to, authentication, tracking, and maintaining specific information about users (site preferences, contents of electronic shopping carts, etc.);
D) the Internet Protocol address of anyone that accesses the Phoenix New Times website from January 1, 2004 to the present;
E) the domain name of anyone that has accessed the Phoenix New Times website from January 1, 2004 to the present;
F) the website a user visited prior to coming to the Phoenix New Times website;
G) the date and time of a visit by a user to the Phoenix New Times website;
H) the type of browser used by each visitor (Internet Explorer, Mozilla, Netscape Navigator, Firefox, etc.) to the Phoenix New Times website; and I) the type of operating system used by each visitor to the Phoenix New Times website."

This story has been picked up by other media outlets around the country, including the NY Times

Censorship

Submission + - Breathtaking Abuse of the Constitution 2

ziggy_az writes: Michael Lacey, the executive editor of Village Voice Media, and Jim Larkin, the CEO of the Phoenix-based chain, were both arrested on Thursday, the very same day their story was published in the Phoenix New Times. The New Times is a free, weekly alternative paper. "It is just without precedent," Lacey said. "This isn't us overreacting." The grand jury subpoenas in question demand "all documents related to articles and other content published by Phoenix New Times newspaper in print and on the Phoenix New Times website, regarding Sheriff Joe Arpaio from January 1, 2004 to the present." Additionally, they want "Hit counts for each page..." regarding specific articles criticizing Sheriff Joe Arpaio as well as "The Internet Protocol" addresses of any and all visitors to each page...". Fair warning to the Phoenix New Times readership: Joe's gang may come-a-looking for you.
The Courts

Submission + - AZ prosecutor, sheriff go after local newspaper

Nothanksidontwanttogotojail writes: According to the Phoenix New Times, CNN, and elsewhere, Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas has been targeting the New Times for information relating to their readership, both online and in print:

"In a breathtaking abuse of the United States Constitution, Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Maricopa County Attorney Andrew Thomas, and their increasingly unhinged cat's paw, special prosecutor Dennis Wilenchik, used the grand jury to subpoena "all documents related to articles and other content published by Phoenix New Times newspaper in print and on the Phoenix New Times website, regarding Sheriff Joe Arpaio from January 1, 2004 to the present" . . . More alarming still, Arpaio, Thomas, and Wilenchik subpoenaed detailed information on anyone who has looked at the New Times Web site since 2004."

Since the publication of the story, New Times founders Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin were arrested early this morning, then subsequently released.

The arrest of Lacey and Larkin are apparently part of a continuing attempt by law enforcement in Maricopa County to stamp out any dissent in their heavy-handed approach to law enforcement. Thomas, who it is believed has never tried an adult felony case by himself, is rumored to have aspirations to higher office (Governor?), used a populist anti-immigration policy to gain his current position as top prosecutor in the county, and has recently failed at trying to get the associate presiding judge to recuse himself from all criminal cases. Thomas and Wilenchik are currently being investigated by the Arizona State bar for misconduct.
Censorship

Submission + - Phoenix sheriff arrests newspaper reporters. (phoenixnewtimes.com)

SnotBob writes: http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2007-10-18/news/breathtaking-abuse-of-the-constitution/1

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/1019newtimes1019.html

From the AZCentral.com story:

Phoenix New Times owners Michael Lacey and Jim Larkin were arrested Thursday night by Maricopa County sheriff's deputies on charges of revealing grand jury information, a misdemeanor.

The charges stem from a story published under their byline in the Thursday edition of New Times, in which they describe a subpoena the paper reportedly received from a grand jury convened by the Maricopa County Attorney's Office.

The alternative weekly newspaper, in its cover story, said the subpoena was part of an investigation orchestrated to get back at its reporters and the critical stories they wrote of County Attorney Andrew Thomas' political ally Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

The scope of the subpoena is unusually broad: It not only demands information from the reporters but also information about all the online readers of the publication since Jan. 1, 2004, including their Internet domain names and browsers and what other Web sites they visited before reading New Times.

The Internet

Submission + - Prosecutor makes mockery of online privacy

netbuzz writes: "A special prosecutor in Arizona has issued a subpoena for all known data about every visitor to a newspaper's Web site going back three years. IP addresses, sites they came from, choice of browser, even the cookies. All because the paper published the home address of a sheriff, an address that's readily available on other government Web sites.

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/20813"

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