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Power

Submission + - CryoEnergy Storage at 1/4 the Cost of Batteries (inhabitat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: One of the major issues with renewable energy technologies like solar and wind power is that energy generation tends to be intermittent — i.e. the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. Therefore, in order for such technologies to be capable of meeting our needs without the support of fossil fuels, we need to find effective and commercially viable ways to store energy. Highview Power Storage recently unveiled a new tech that holds great promise for energy storage — the CryoEnergy System (CES). CES takes excess energy generated and uses it to run refrigeration units which cool air down to a temperature of -196C (-320.8F), at which point it liquefies. The liquid air, also known as cryogen, can be stored in an insulated tank, and at times of peak-demand, when the direst output of existing energy sources cannot meet the demands of a power grid, this liquid air is released to generate energy.
Security

Submission + - McAfee's website full of security holes (networkworld.com) 1

Julie188 writes: "The McAfee.com website is full of security mistakes that could lead to cross-site scripting and other attacks, researchers said in a post on the Full Disclosure site on Monday. The holes with the site were found by the YGN Ethical Hacker Group, and reported to McAfee on Feb. 10, YGN says, before they were publicly disclosed to the security/hacking mailing list. Embarrassing? Yes, especially given that the company aggressively markets its own McAfee Secure service that is supposed to assure consumers that McAfee has scanned a website and found it to be safe."

Submission + - What's the cost of a Gigabyte? 1

interfecio writes: Bandwidth costs are a hot item currently, with Canada ISPs introducing allowances and charging overages, do you know what you're paying for each Gig transferred? I've looked at my routers transfer stats, and it's quite interesting.

November 2010 (Incoming: 109555 MB / Outgoing: 5825 MB)
December 2010 (Incoming: 119505 MB / Outgoing: 4931 MB)
January 2011 (Incoming: 119884 MB / Outgoing: 4579 MB)

@ $58/mo it comes out to on average 47 cents per GB. I'm not exactly a light user, but I wouldn't consider my household extreme either. With a lot of information now "cloud" based, video, voice, data storage, will we start to see a reversal of cloud services because costs could become more of a factor?

Submission + - Motorola sticks to guns on locking down Android (androidcentral.com)

jeffmeden writes: "These aren't the droids you're looking for" proclaims Motorola, maker of the popular Android smartphones such as the Droid 2 and Droid X. At least, not if you have any intention of loading a customized operating system, according to Motorola's own Youtube channel used to show off upcoming products. Motorola:"@tdcrooks if you want to do custom roms, then buy elsewhere, we'll continue with our strategy that is working thanks." The strategy they are referring to is a feature Motorola pioneered called "e-fuse", the ability for the phone's CPU to stop working if it detects unauthorized software running. More information available via a story at Android blog site AndroidCentral
Space

Submission + - Canadian firm plans 78-satellite Net service (cnet.com) 1

matty619 writes: A CNET article is reporting on another try at low earth orbit satellites for internet access, reminiscent of Teledesic, an ill fated $9Billion Bill Gates/Paul Alen et al venture originally consisting of 840 low earth orbit satellites (LEO-SAT).

MSCI, which stands for Microsat Systems Canada Inc., is trying to be a bit of a maverick with its project, called CommStellation. The company said today that its approach of using small, inexpensive satellites in low orbit--about 620 miles above the Earth--means better coverage of the world's population, quicker launch, and better network capacity.

Specifically, the company is able to use more ordinary electronics with its lower-elevation satellites. Medium orbit satellites--about 5,000 miles above Earth--such as rival O3b need components with higher reliability in order to withstand the temperature and radiation rigors of space. MSCI's satellites are also relatively small, meaning that 14 can be packed into a single launch rocket compared with O3b's 4 satellites. And much less power is required to transmit data to and from the MSCI's satellites since they're closer to Earth.

Each MSCI satellite has a data-transfer capacity of 12 gigabits per second. The expected lifespan of each is 10 years, and they can be sent back into the atmosphere at the end of their lives to avoid more orbital clutter.

Google

Submission + - Google, H.264 and WebM - the mud clears (sort of)

rudy_wayne writes: When it was announced that H.264 was being dropped from Google's Chrome browser I thought it was really weird since Google converted all of YouTube's videos to H.264 just 3 years ago. Now, Charles Arthur, writing for The Guardian says the decision to drop H.264 was made entirely by the Chrome team and did not come from Google's top management. A related article at ZDNet sums it up as "Google is not giving up H.264 on YouTube, H.264 will continue to be supported in Android, and it has nothing to do with YouTube storage issues, H.264 license pricing or Google's desire to be totally open source — it's about Chrome wanting to be disruptive.
Science

Submission + - The LHC Grid can't model the Grid (nature.com)

gbrumfiel writes: Nature News has just published a story that tracks data from the Large Hadron Collider across the machine's computing Grid. As I mention in an accompanying blog post, one odd fact is about the Grid is that the people running it don't have very good models of it. They've tried, but the whole system (roughly 200,000 processing cores in 34 countries) is just too complex. Fortunately, the Grid seems to work pretty well regardless.
Security

Submission + - FAA: Lasers pointed at aircraft doubled in 2010 (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: Perhaps it is the advent of cheaper lasers that anyone can afford or maybe just an increase in morons, but the FAA today said that in 2010, nationwide reports of laser beams being pointed at airplanes almost doubled from 2009 to more than 2,800, making it the highest number of laser events since the FAA began keeping track in 2005.

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