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Submission + - Birth of a black hole caught on camera (extremetech.com)

infodragon writes: For the first time the birth of a black hole has been caught on camera. RAPTOR, or RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response, was able to quickly detect the initial changes that prompted a closer look. What resulted was the largest gamma ray burst ever detected and greater than theoretically possible. To say the least, this is a valuable and exciting find that will add to our understanding of the universe!

Submission + - Apple: Don't make nuclear weapons using iTunes (cnet.com) 4

infodragon writes: Excerpt from EULA Paragraph G: "You also agree that you will not use these products for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of nuclear, missiles, or chemical or biological weapons."
Android

Submission + - How do you store sensitive data on your mobile devices?

infodragon writes: I'm just now seriously diving into the mobile world and have many questions surrounding all the devices, apps and options. However, one stands out; How do I protect sensitive data? On Linux this question is easy, I use RAID 1/5/6, depending on need, with LVM in the middle and topped with LUKS. This setup is very powerful and extremely flexible. Is it possible to match the strength of LUKS on Android? iOS? What are the solutions the /. crowd has used?
Science

Submission + - Inflammatory response linked to autism. (nytimes.com)

infodragon writes: A few interesting quotes

"At least a subset of autism — perhaps one-third, and very likely more — looks like a type of inflammatory disease."

"These findings are important for many reasons, but perhaps the most noteworthy is that they provide evidence of an abnormal, continuing biological process. That means that there is finally a therapeutic target for a disorder defined by behavioral criteria like social impairments, difficulty communicating and repetitive behaviors. "

"One large Danish study, which included nearly 700,000 births over a decade, found that a mother’s rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease of the joints, elevated a child’s risk of autism by 80 percent. Her celiac disease, an inflammatory disease prompted by proteins in wheat and other grains, increased it 350 percent. Genetic studies tell a similar tale. Gene variants associated with autoimmune disease — genes of the immune system — also increase the risk of autism, especially when they occur in the mother. "

Science

Submission + - Recent Antarctic Peninsula Warming began 600 years ago (sciencedaily.com)

infodragon writes: Results published this week by a team of polar scientists from Britain, Australia and France adds a new dimension to our understanding of Antarctic Peninsula climate change and the likely causes of the break-up of its ice shelves.

The scientists reveal that the rapid warming of this region over the last 100 years has been unprecedented and came on top of a slower natural climate warming that began around 600 years ago

Apple

Submission + - Judge Koh suggests Apple is "smoking crack" in Samsung case (slashgear.com)

infodragon writes: Today in the ongoing Apple vs Samsung court case Judge Lucy Koh’s patience wore thin as Apple presented a 75-page document highlighting 22 witnesses it would like to call in for rebuttal testimony, provided the court had the time. As those following the case closely know quite well, the case has a set number of hours which are already wearing quite thin. As quoted by The Verge as they sat in the courtroom listening in, Koh wondered aloud why Apple would offer the list “when unless you’re smoking crack you know these witnesses aren’t going to be called!”
Idle

Submission + - Burglar nabbed after turning on Steve Jobs' stolen Macs (cnet.com)

infodragon writes: Whoever broke into the home of the late Steve Jobs is probably now wishing that a different house had been the target.

The Palo Alto, Calif., home was robbed on July 17 of more than $60,000 in computers and other items, according to the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office. Kariem McFarlin, a 35-year-old man, was arrested and charged with the crime and apparently it wasn't hard for police to catch him.

Science

Submission + - The more science you know, the less worried you are about climate (theregister.co.uk)

infodragon writes: A US government-funded survey has found that Americans with higher levels of scientific and mathematical knowledge are more skeptical regarding the dangers of climate change than their more poorly educated fellow citizens...
Thus it is, according to the assembled profs, that the US government should seek to fund a communication strategy on climate change which is not focused on sound scientific information.

Earth

Submission + - Google project maps U.S. geothermal energy potenti (smartplanet.com)

infodragon writes: Excluding inaccessible zones such as national parks and protected lands, the United States has enough geothermal energy, accessible using current methods, to generate 9,000 times as much power as our current coal output. http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2011/10/26/google-funded-project-confirms-vast-potential-for-geothermal-energy/
Idle

Submission + - A Drop Of Oil Completes a Maze As Well As a Rat (popsci.com) 1

infodragon writes: Successfully navigating a complex maze is the basic lab test for intelligence. Rats can do it. Cuttlefish can do it. And now, inanimate droplets of oil can do it. By creating a pH gradient, scientists induced the an oil drop to navigate a maze, an advance with important applications in drug delivery, urban planning, and computer modeling.

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