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Submission + - Polllution Makes Birds Homosexual (foxnews.com) 2

Velcroman1 writes: The nature versus nurture debate just took an unexpected turn — thanks to pollution. Increased exposure to the toxic chemical mercury can affect sexual preference in certain species of birds — inducing homosexuality, a new study has revealed. Peter Frederick, an ecologist from the University of Florida, and Nilmini Jayasena from the University of Peradeniya in Sri Lanka found that male American white ibises that consumed methylmercury, the most toxic and easily digested form of mercury found in the environment, were more likely to pair with other males."We knew that mercury was likely to affect reproductive hormones from an earlier study," Frederick said, "so we suspected some aspect of reproduction would be affected. We had no clue that mate choice might be involved," he added.

Submission + - WikiLeaks has deleted 21 cables from web (privetbank.com.ua)

An anonymous reader writes: Wikileaks has recently removed 20 cables from their torrent and web. As well 10STATE17263 (about Iran and North Korea missile programs) is not available for more then 12 hours.
Is this start of censorship for CableGate or a bug?


Submission + - 'Neuro-genetic' robots on parade (computerworld.co.nz)

Rob O'Neill writes: "Robots with genes and robots that can change their shape were among research presented at the 15th ICONIP (International Conference on Neuro-Information Processing), in Auckland. One of the highlights of the conference was a presentation by Dr Kenji Doya, of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology in Japan, which showed neuro-genetic robots, says Kasabov. "Robots are now not only based on fixed rules about how to behave, they now have genes, similar to human genes, which affect their behaviour, development and learning," he says. Discoveries on how genes relate to learning have enabled the development of robots with genes, he says."

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