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Submission + - Scientific American censors blog post for not being scientific enough 2

rogue-girl writes: The popular science magazine 'Scientific American' is getting hard time after it removed a blog post by contributor DNLee, blogging at Urban Scientist. DNLee's post discussed integrity in science and misconduct from science communicators. DNLee has been approached by BiologyOnline staff Ofek who invited her to contribute. When DNLee asked for compensation details and learned she'd be writing for free, she kindly turned down the offer. In response, Ofek called her a "whore". DNLee wrote a post on her Scientific American blog, but the post was removed. It also appears that Biology Online is SciAm's partner, but SciAm's editor in chief Mariette di Christina claimed the partnership has nothing to do with the removal, but pulling it down is due to insufficient scientific content. DNLee's original post has been reposted here, and a Storify with (outraged) reactions is also available.

Submission + - JavaScript-Based OpenRISC Emulator Can Run Linux, GCC, Wayland (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The jor1k is an interesting open-source toy emulator project to emulate a 32-bit OpenRISC OR1000 processor, 63MB of RAM, ocfb frame-buffer, and ATA-hard drive.... All in JavaScript. Though JavaScript based, there's asm.js optimizations and the performance seems to be quite decent in modern web-browsers. The jor1k OpenRISC emulator can do a lot even handle running the Linux kernel, GCC compiler, ScummVM Monkey Island, and the Wayland/Weston Compositor all from within the web-browser

Submission + - What is Tor and why does it matter? (thenextweb.com)

clairecolex writes: We all live in public, at least as far as the US National Security Agency is concerned. As Internet users and global citizens become more aware of surveillance activities that the US and other countries are doing on the World Wide Web, there are those who seek to ensure that privacy and personal freedoms aren’t trampled upon.

Tor technology aims to help appease privacy advocates and offer a way in which the Internet can be enjoyed without the prying eyes of surveillance programs or other tracking software. This free piece of software has certainly become mainstream in light of recent events, but what is Tor and why does it matter to you, your family, neighbors, co-workers, and the rest of the Internet?

Peeling back the onion layers

It might surprise you that the Tor Project, originally an acronym for The Onion Router Project, was initially funded by the US Naval Research Laboratory and helped launch the development of onion routing (anonymous communication over a computer network) on behalf of DARPA. It had also received the backing from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

When users installed Tor software onto their computers, it would conceal their identity and network activity from anyone spying on their behavior. This was accomplished by separating the identification and routing information. The data is transmitted through multiple computers via a network of relays run by like-minded volunteers — almost like how users installed SETI software to look for extraterrestrial beings.

Tor isn’t the only service that helps you hide in the shadows away from the prying eyes of the federal government, or any other person who would do it for malicious purposes. However, some say that it’s better because it works at the Transmission Control Protocol stream level. Full post: http://thenextweb.com/insider/2013/10/08/what-is-tor-and-why-does-it-matter/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheNextWeb+(The+Next+Web+All+Stories)

Submission + - Obamacare Marketplace: Info Can Be Shared With Law Enforcement (weeklystandard.com)

rotorbudd writes: Maryland's Health Connection has an interesting statement at the end of it's privacy policy.
"Any information that you provide to us in your application will be used only to carry out the functions of Maryland Health Connection. The only exception to this policy is that we may share information provided in your application with the appropriate authorities for law enforcement and audit activities. "

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