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Submission + - Dead Reckoning For Your Car Eliminates GPS Dead Zones 3

cartechboy writes: We've all been there. You're relying on your vehicle's built-in navigation system to get to that meeting downtown, but then suddenly the car loses the satellite signal due to the concrete skyscraper canyon you're in--and you're about to be late. Swiss semiconductor manufacturer U-Blox thinks it has the solution with 3D Automotive Dead Reckoning, or 3D ADR for short. It's a new navigation chip that uses the vehicle's built-in sensors to track speed, horizontal movement, and elevation. The 3D ADR system measures movement in three dimensions, letting the navigation system can keep track of the vehicle's location even when it loses its connection to GPS satellites. Imagine never having to see your navigation screen saying connection lost again. In an age where our phones have accelerometers and compasses, it's amazing your car is still trying to catch up, right?

Submission + - New Type of Star Can Emerge From Inside Black Holes, Say Cosmologists (

KentuckyFC writes: Black holes form when a large star runs out of fuel and collapses under its own weight. Since there is no known force that can stop this collapse, astrophysicists have always assumed that it forms a singularity, a region of space that is infinitely dense. Now cosmologists think quantum gravity might prevent this complete collapse after all. They say that the same force that stops an electron spiralling into a nucleus might also cause the collapsing star to "bounce" at scales of around 10^-14cm. They're calling this new state a "Planck star" and say it's lifetime would match that of the black hole itself as it evaporates. That raises the possibility that the shrinking event horizon would eventually meet the expanding Planck star, which emerges with a sudden blast of gamma rays. That radiation would allow any information trapped in the black hole to escape, solving the infamous information paradox. If they're right, these gamma rays may already have been detected by space-based telescopes meaning that the evidence is already there for any enterprising astronomer to tease apart.

Submission + - Curiosity Has Breached 'Dingo Gap' Mars Dune's Crest (

astroengine writes: On Tuesday at precisely 12:55 p.m. EST (17:55 UTC), Mars rover Curiosity successfully breached the crest of the dune in “Dingo Gap.” The 1 meter-high dune stands between the rover and a smoother route to the mission’s next science target. The timestamps on the raw imagery suggests the short drive up the sandy slope took around 25 minutes, where it appears to have paused at the dune's apex.

Submission + - Will it be coffee or beer ? ( writes: Coffee and beer are polar opposites in the beverage world. Coffee picks you up, and beer winds you down.
Telomeres, made of DNA and proteins, mark the ends of the strands of DNA in our chromosomes. They are essential to ensuring that the DNA strands are repaired and copied correctly. Every time a cell duplicates, the chromosomes are copied into the new cell with slightly shorter telomeres. Eventually, the telomeres become too short, and the cell dies. Only fetal and cancer cells have mechanisms to avoid this fate; they go on reproducing forever.
The researchers found that caffeine shortens and alcohol lengthens telomeres — the end points of chromosomal DNA, implicated in aging and cancer.

Submission + - Court: Open Source Project Liable For 3rd Party DRM-Busting Coding (

Diamonddavej writes: TorrentFreak reports a potentially troubling court decision in Germany. The company Appwork has been threatened with a 250,000 Euro fine fine for functionality committed to its open-source downloader (JDownloader2) repository by a volunteer coder without Appwork's knowledge. The infringing code enables downloading of RTMPE video streams (an encrypted streaming video format developed by Adobe). Since the code decrypted the video streams, the Hamburg Regional Court decided it represented circumvention of an “effective technological measure” under Section 95a of Germany’s Copyright Act and it threatened Appwork with a fine for "production, distribution and possession" of an 'illegal' piece of software.

Submission + - FSF responds to Microsoft's privacy and encryption announcement (

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft announced yesterday their plans to encrypt customer data to prevent government snooping. Free Software Foundation executive directory John Sullivan asks the logic of trusting nonfree software and adds "Proprietary software like Windows is fundamentally insecure not because of Microsoft's privacy policies but because its code is hidden from the very users whose interests it is supposed to secure."

Submission + - Massive 'Cells' Seen on Sun (

sciencehabit writes: Large flows of material that circulate heat from the sun’s interior to its surface, theorized since the late 1960s but never seen directly, have finally been spotted. Researchers have long known of smaller flows called granules (which last a few minutes and are typically about 1000 kilometers across) and supergranules (which last about 1 day and are usually about 30,000 km across). The new swirls, which roil the outermost 30% of the sun’s interior, are several hundreds of thousands of kilometers across and persist for several months. Among other things, giant cell circulation helps transport energy from the sun’s polar regions to its equator, where material rotates around the sun about 10 days faster than it does near the poles. The flows also substantially influence the structure and evolution of the sun’s magnetic field, the researchers suspect. Active regions on the solar surface, often the sources of solar flares, may form in areas where flows converge, causing magnetic fields to become concentrated.

Submission + - Do Gut Bacteria Cause Autism? (

sciencehabit writes: Many physicians and parents report that their autistic children have unusually severe gastrointestinal problems, such as chronic constipation or diarrhea. These observations have led some researchers to speculate that an ailing gut contributes to the disorder in some cases, but scientific data has been lacking. Now, a provocative study claims that a probiotic treatment for gastrointestinal issues can reduce autismlike symptoms in mice and suggests that this treatment could work for humans, too.

Submission + - High-Energy Rechargeable Molten-Air batteries developed at George Washington U

haruchai writes: Researchers have demonstrated what's considered a new class of battery, using either iron, carbon or vanadium-boride as the anode.
Energy densities are from 10%-70% that of gasoline by weight, or 100%-250% by volume and the batteries have an operating temp of ~700 C story: paper:

Submission + - Google's Direct Attack On Facebook

An anonymous reader writes: Google on Friday announced an upcoming change to its terms of service that will let the company add users' names and photos to certain parts of its advertising, starting on November 11. Make no mistake: this is a direct attack against Facebook. One of the few advantages of Google+ is that it features no ads. To be perfectly clear, Google isn't changing that. Google+ will still have a clean interface, at least for the foreseeable future. Instead, Google is tying Google+ into yet another one of its properties, and arguably its most important one: Google Ads. In short, Google plans to steal revenue from Facebook by copying its social ads.

4-Billion-Pixel Panorama View From Curiosity Rover 101

SternisheFan points out that there is a great new panorama made from shots from the Curiosity Rover. "Sweep your gaze around Gale Crater on Mars, where NASA's Curiosity rover is currently exploring, with this 4-billion-pixel panorama stitched together from 295 images. ...The entire image stretches 90,000 by 45,000 pixels and uses pictures taken by the rover's two MastCams. The best way to enjoy it is to go into fullscreen mode and slowly soak up the scenery — from the distant high edges of the crater to the enormous and looming Mount Sharp, the rover's eventual destination."

MPAA Agent Poses As Homebuyer To Catch Pirates 289

bonch writes "The MPAA used an undercover agent posing as a potential homebuyer to gain access to the home of a British couple charged with running a streaming links site. UK authorities decided not to pursue the case, but the MPAA continued, focusing on a Boston programmer who worked on the site, leading to an unprecedented legal maneuver whereby U.S. charges were dropped in exchange for testimony in a UK fraud case."

Do Companies Punish Workers Who Take Vacations? 948

Hugh Pickens writes "Chad Brooks reports that a steady stream of research over the past year reveals that Americans aren't taking vacations and it's because they are afraid to take time off from work for fear of appearing less than dedicated to their employer with one survey showing that 70 percent of employees said they weren't using all their earned vacation days in 2011. 'You have this kind of fear of not wanting to be seen as a slacker,' says John de Graaf, executive director of Take Back Your Time, an organization focused on challenging the epidemic of overwork, over-scheduling and time famine facing society. De Graaf adds that while some companies are good about encouraging employees to use earned time off, there also are some that aren't worried about the potential repercussions that may come from that nose-to-the-grindstone approach. 'They think, "If I burn someone out, I can always find someone else,"' says de Graaf. 'They think [employees] are expendable.' Even when they do take vacation, research shows many employees aren't leaving their work behind. In one study, 66 percent of surveyed employees said they would check and respond to email during their time off, and 29 percent expect to attend meetings virtually while on vacation. De Graaf is not optimistic anything will ever get done to free employees of their fear of taking time off. 'This is the only wealthy country in the world that does not guarantee any paid vacation time,' says de Graaf. 'Every other country understands that this makes people healthier and creates a better workforce.'"

Submission + - "Lean to code, get a job." according to CNN & ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: CNN is running an opinion article that talks about Michael Bloomberg's taking part in CodeAdacemy's CodeYear program, which aims to teach average people to learn enough to where they can find work as a Software Developer by year end. I'm trying to not be elitist in judging this article and those involved, so I'm curious as to what the /. hoarde will think of this as well.

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