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Submission + - Heartbleed: Serious OpenSSL zero day vulnerability revealed (heartbleed.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: ZDNet reports: New security holes are always showing up. The latest one, the so-called Heartbleed Bug in the OpenSSL cryptographic library, is an especially bad one. The flaw can potentially be used to reveal not just the contents of a secured-message, such as a credit-card transaction over HTTPS, but the primary and secondary SSL keys themselves. This data could then, in theory, be used as a skeleton keys to bypass secure servers without leaving a trace that a site had been hacked.

Submission + - OKCupid blocks Mozilla Firefox over gay rights (bbc.com)

PortWineBoy writes: The Beeb is reporting that OkCupid is prompting Mozilla Firefox users to switch browsers over Brendan Eich's opposition to Prop 8 in California in 2008. Users are met with a message stating that OkayCupid would prefer no one access their site with Mozilla software. Eich is the new CEO of Mozilla.

Submission + - Apparent Theft at Mt. Gox Shakes Bitcoin World (nytimes.com)

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: The most prominent Bitcoin exchange appeared to be on the verge of collapse late Monday, raising questions about the future of a volatile marketplace. On Monday night, a number of leading Bitcoin companies jointly announced that Mt. Gox, the largest exchange for most of Bitcoin’s existence, was planning to file for bankruptcy after months of technological problems and what appeared to have been a major theft. A document circulating widely in the Bitcoin world said the company had lost 744,000 Bitcoins in a theft that had gone unnoticed for years. That would be about 6 percent of the 12.4 million Bitcoins in circulation.

Submission + - Google To Encrypt Cloud Storage Data By Default (itworld.com) 1

jfruh writes: Worries about snooping are now a permanent part of our computing landscape, but Google is attempting to ameliorate those fears by encrypting all data on its Google Cloud Storage service by default. Data is encrypted with 128-bit AES, and you can manage the keys yourself or have Google do it for you. A Google spokesperson said that the company "does not provide encryption keys to any government."

Submission + - Ubuntu Edge Now Most-Backed Crowdfunding Campaign Ever

Volanin writes: After nearly a month of its assumed happening, Ubuntu Edge has now passed the $10.2 million mark, thus making it the most pledged-to crowd-funder in history. While the Ubuntu Edge campaign is to be commended for reaching such a mammoth milestone as this, it can’t quite claim ultimate victory yet, since it's just short of making one-third of its $32 million goal with a little less than a week left. Can they do it?
Google

Submission + - Swedish Language Council Pressured By Google (thelocal.se)

An anonymous reader writes: In December 2012 the Swedish Language Council, a semi-official body regulating the Swedish language, unveiled its customary annual list of new Swedish words. Among the words that Swedes had begun using in 2012 was "ogooglebar" ('ungoogleable'). The word was to be used to describe something "that you can't find on the web with the use of a search engine", according to the Language Council. Google soon got into a huff, asking the council to amend its definition. Google wanted the council to specify that the word's definition only covered searches performed using Google, and not searches involving other search engines. However, the language experts instead chose to remove the term altogether. According to Language Council's head Ann Cederberg, the Council could have compromised with Google's requests, but decided to instead spark a debate. "It would go against our principles, and the principles of language. Google has forgotten one thing: language development doesn't care about brand protection."

Submission + - Scientists Unravel Mysteries to Spider Silk Strength Using Lasers

An anonymous reader writes: They may be creepy and crawly, but spiders produce some of the world's strongest material: silk. Weight for weight, spider silk is five times as strong as piano wire. Now, scientists at Arizona Statue University have announced that they have found a way to obtain a wide variety of elastic properties of the silk of several intact spiders' webs using a sophisticated laser light scattering technique.
Piracy

Submission + - Police raid home of 9-year-old Pirate Bay user, seize 'Winnie the Pooh' laptop (bgr.com) 1

zacharye writes: Copyright enforcement might be getting out of hand in Scandinavia. As anti-piracy groups and copyright owners continue to work with authorities to curtail piracy in the region, police this week raided the home of a 9-year-old suspect and confiscated her “Winnie the Pooh” laptop. TorrentFreak reports that the girl’s home was raided after local anti-piracy group CIAPC determined copyrighted files had been downloaded illegally at her residence. Her father, the Internet service account holder, was contacted by CIAPC, which demanded that he pay a 600 euro fine and sign a non-disclosure agreement to settle the matter. When the man did not comply, authorities raided his home and collected evidence, including his 9-year-old daughter’s notebook computer...
Software

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How to ask college to change Intro to Computing? 3

taz346 writes: I got a Bachelor's degree 30 years ago, but I recently started back to college to get an Associate's degree. Most of the core courses are already covered by my B.A. but one that I didn't take way back when was Introduction to Computing. I am taking that now but have been very disappointed to find that it is really just Introduction to Microsoft Office 2010. That's actually the name of the (very expensive) textbook. It is mindless, boring and pretty useless for someone who's used PCs for about 20 years. But beyond that, why does it have to be all about MS Office and nothing else? Couldn't they just teach people to create documents, etc., and let them use any office software, like Libre Office? It seems to me that would be more useful; students would learn how to actually create things on their computers, not just follow step-by-step commands from a dumbed-down book about one piece of increasingly expensive software. I know doing it the way they do now is easy for the college, but it's not really teaching students much about what they can do with computers. So when the class is over, I plan to write a letter to the college asking them to change the course as I suggested above. I'm not real hopeful, but what the heck. Do folks out there have any good suggestions as to what might be the most persuasive arguments I can make?

Submission + - Gaming with only one hand...

Hork_Monkey writes: I recently sustained a severe injury to one of my arms, and lucky not to be an amputee. I'm an avid gamer (primarily PC, but also XBox) and looking for advice one how to adapt to the challenge now presented of enjoying one of my favorite past times. My google-fu has lead me to some devices and tips, but I wanted to tap the collective while experimenting. I know there has to be some /.'ers in a similar position who could provide some guidance. I'm figuring a few things out, and also hope to share what I find for others in a similar situation.
Science

Submission + - Promising Low Cost Energy Storage (technologyreview.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Pittsburgh based company Aquion has developed a low cost sodium-ion based battery. Using relatively non-toxic components this battery has been tested by third parties and shown to handle 5,000 charge-discharge cycles with an overall efficiency of over 85 percent. The battery, having high mass and volume per unit of energy storage would be ideal for non-mobile applications — utility scale energy storage and UPS like applications. The company has recently raised $30 Million in funding, and is planning a production line and large scale utility tests. If practical, this battery could profoundly benefit the energy storage business.
Medicine

Submission + - Stroke Victim Stranded at Amundsen-Scott Base

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Renee-Nicole Douceur, the winter manager at the Amundsen-Scott research station at the South Pole, was sitting at her desk on August 27 when she suffered a stroke. “I looked at the screen and was like, ‘Oh my God, half the screen is missing,’ ” But both the National Science Foundation sand contractor Raytheon say that it would be too dangerous to send a rescue plane to the South Pole now and that Douceur’s condition is not life-threatening. Douceur's niece Sydney Raines has set up a Web site that urges people to call officials at Raytheon and the National Science Foundation. However temperatures must be higher than minus 50 degrees F for most planes to land at Amundsen-Scott or the fuel will turn to jelly and while that threshold has been crossed at the South Pole recently, the temperature still regularly dips to 70 degrees below zero. “It’s like no other airfield in the U.S.,” says Ronnie Smith, a former Air Force navigator who has flown there about 300 times. A pilot landing a plane there in winter, when it is dark 24 hours a day, would be flying blind “because you can’t install lights under the ice." The most famous instance of a person being airlifted from the South Pole for medical reasons was that involving Jerri Nielsen FitzGerald, a doctor who diagnosed and treated her own breast cancer and using only ice and a local anesthetic, performed her own biopsy with the help of a resident welder. When she departed, on October 16, 1999, it was the earliest in the Antarctic spring that a plane had taken off."

Submission + - Cloned drug sniffing dogs prove successful in S. K (singularityhub.com)

Rexdude writes: A prize drug sniffing dog at Incheon Airport in S Korea was cloned 4 years ago, and now the clones have proved to be much more successful at becoming sniffer dogs themselves compared to regular dogs. Not as controversial as human cloning, but are we going to see genetic copyrights on prized animal breeds in the future?
Power

Submission + - MIT Develops Fast Charging Liquid Flow Batteries (inhabitat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A team of researchers at MIT set out to “reinvent the rechargeable battery” and succeeded by creating a liquid-flow battery, suitable for electric vehicles that can be recharged as quickly as simply pumping gas and could halve the cost of current EV batteries. The new batteries involve a semi-solid, liquid electrolyte material which holds suspended positive and negative electrodes that provide needed electricity.

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