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Science

Submission + - Matter-antimatter bias seen in Fermilab collisions (nytimes.com)

ubermiester writes: The NYTimes is reporting that scientists Fermilab have found evidence of a very small (about 1%) average difference between the amount of matter/anti-matter produced in a series of particle collisions. FTA: "[T]he team, known as the DZero collaboration, found that the fireballs produced pairs of the particles known as muons, which are sort of fat electrons, slightly more often than they produced pairs of anti-muons. So the miniature universe inside the accelerator went from being neutral to being about 1 percent more matter than antimatter." This offers a possible explanation for why there is so much more matter than anti-matter in the universe in spite of "Big Bang" theory suggesting that there should be equal amounts of both. (Here's a PDF version of the paper.)
Biotech

How Norway Fought Staph Infections 595

eldavojohn writes "Studies are showing that Norway's dirtiest hospitals are actually cleaner than most other countries', and the reason for this is that Norwegians stopped taking antibiotics. A number of factors like paid sick leave and now restrictions on advertising for drugs make Norway an anomaly when it comes to diseases like Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A Norwegian doctor explains, 'We don't throw antibiotics at every person with a fever. We tell them to hang on, wait and see, and we give them a Tylenol to feel better.' Norway is the most MRSA free country in the world. In a country like Japan, where 17,000 die from MRSA every year, 'doctors overprescribe antibiotics because they are given financial incentives to push drugs on patients.'"
Space

Submission + - Solving the Mystery of Cosmic Rays' Origins (spacefellowship.com)

Matt_dk writes: Nearly 100 years ago, scientists detected the first signs of cosmic rays — subatomic particles (mostly protons) that zip through space at nearly the speed of light. The most energetic cosmic rays hit with the punch of a 98-mph fastball, even though they are smaller than an atom. Astronomers questioned what natural force could accelerate particles to such a speed. New evidence from the VERITAS telescope array shows that cosmic rays likely are powered by exploding stars and stellar “winds.”
Censorship

Submission + - Warner Music Forces Lessig Presentation Offline

An anonymous reader writes: Larry Lessig, known (hopefully) to everyone around here as a defender of all things having to do with consumer rights and fair use rights when it comes to copyright, is now on the receiving end of a DMCA takedown notice from Warner Music, who apparently claimed that one of Lessig's famous presentations violated on their copyright. Lessig has said that he's absolutely planning on fighting this, and has asked someone to send Warner Music a copy of US copyright law that deals with "fair use."
Editorial

Submission + - Bob McDonald makes a case for small nuclear plants (www.cbc.ca)

Socguy writes: "Bob McDonald, host of Quirks and Quarks, makes a case for Small-Nuclear power plants as part of the energy mix that will power our future. A particular system mentioned is the Toshiba 4S, a desk sized power plant. The 4S is theoretically designed to operate for 30 years without refueling.

http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/2007/10/nuke_necessity_think_small.html"

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