Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Compare cell phone plans using Wirefly's innovative plan comparison tool ×
Bug

Submission + - Six months without Adobe Flash, and I feel fine (hou2600.org)

hessian writes: "As documented on /., six months ago I de-installed the Adobe FlashTM player on all my browsers.

This provoked some shock and incredulity from others. After all, Flash has been an essential content interpreter for over a decade. It filled the gap between an underdeveloped JavaScript and the need for media content like animation, video and so on."

Security

Submission + - Web-hosting service DreamHost warns users of passw (cnet.com)

hessian writes: "The company said it had reset all customer FTP passwords as a precaution and that users would have to create new ones by logging in to their DreamHost Web panel. It also advised customers to change their e-mail passwords, though it said e-mail passwords and billing information were not accessed.

DreamHost added today that handling new password requests was taking some time:

"Processing user updates is taking longer than usual due to the sheer number of customers requesting password changes on our system," the company said in a status update posted to its Web site. "We understand your desire to get things working in an expeditious manner and we are working hard to get you there. We're examining ways of decreasing the queue depth, but we're still faced with the fact that there is a considerable amount of work to be processed and apologize for the delay.""

Privacy

Submission + - AT&T hackers warned of vulnerability, now prov (hou2600.org)

hessian writes: "A few years ago, a smart young hacker saw a blatant hole in AT&T security and so whipped up a quick script to mine the website for information.

However, this guy was a grey hat or white hat hacker, meaning that he did not have criminal intent of the for-profit variety. Instead, he was just curious to see if it could be done. He sent the data to the corporation and, when they ignored him, published the hack.

They came down on him like a ton of bricks. Today, a similar hack may have leaked confidential customer information from AT&T. They were warned by a hacker but because of the source, ignored it, and now their customers are the ones to pay for AT&T's hacker-phobia."

Government

Submission + - Darpa Begs Hackers: Secure Our Networks, End 'Seas (wired.com)

hessian writes: "The Pentagon’s far-out research agency and its brand new military command for cyberspace have a confession to make. They don’t really know how to keep U.S. military networks secure. And they want to know: Could you help them out?

Darpa convened a “cyber colloquium” at a swank northern Virginia hotel on Monday for what it called a “frank discussion” about the persistent vulnerabilities within the Defense Department’s data networks. The Pentagon can’t defend those networks on its own, the agency admitted."

Privacy

Submission + - FBI to launch nationwide facial recognition servic (nextgov.com) 1

hessian writes: "The FBI by mid-January will activate a nationwide facial recognition service in select states that will allow local police to identify unknown subjects in photos, bureau officials told Nextgov.

The federal government is embarking on a multiyear, $1 billion dollar overhaul of the FBI's existing fingerprint database to more quickly and accurately identify suspects, partly through applying other biometric markers, such as iris scans and voice recordings."

Privacy

Submission + - Last.fm down for unknown reasons (blog.last.fm)

hessian writes: "Since 04:00 GMT on Sunday morning, the primary Radb service has been exhibiting intermittent problems meeting acceptable service levels. This means that libraries, scrobble counts and the services associated with them (stats, radio stations etc) appear to be broken when you use Last.fm."
Security

Submission + - PBS.org hacked and serving malware (zdnet.com)

hessian writes: "According to researchers at Purewire, attempts to access certain PBS Web site pages yielded JavaScript that serves exploits from a malicious domain via an iframe.

The malicious JavaScript was found on the âoeCurious Georgeâ page that provides content on the popular animation series."

Slashdot Top Deals

Natural laws have no pity.

Working...