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Japan

Submission + - Japan’s tsunami devastates prefecture in 6 m (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: News reports this week are understandably focusing on the events that have recently shook Japan to its core. An 8.9 magnitude earthquake just off the coast, followed by a tsunami, has devastated parts of the country and taken thousands of lives. The extent of the damage is still being realized, there are thousands of people still missing, and problems with nucelar reactors could escalate.

While most of the video footage seen on TV so far has shown the extent of the devastation, it is mainly seen from the viewpoint of someone in a helicopter, or after the damage has been caused in an area. But now we have some raw footage of someone who experienced the torrent of water passing through his home prefecture at ground level.

As you can see in the video, it caught some drivers unaware and in a little over 6 minutes we see a dry Japanese street turn into a fast moving torrent of water ripping buildings from their foundations, crushing cars, overturning boats, and rising a few meters above ground level. The footage was captured in the Miyagi Prefecture in the city of Kesennuma which is home to 74,000 people.

Submission + - Robert X Cringely predicts more mininuke plants (cringely.com)

LandGator writes: "PC pundit Robert X Cringely had a life before writing "Triumph of the Nerds" for PBS: He covered the atomics industry and reported on Three Mile Island. In this blog post, he analyzes the Fukushima reactor failures, and suggests the end result will be a rapid growth in small, sealed 'package' nuclear reactors such as the Toshiba 4S generator considered for Galena, Alaska. He thinks Japan may have little choice, and with rolling blackouts scheduled, he may be right."
Botnet

Submission + - ENISA Gears Up for War on Botnets (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: The European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA), Europe's Cyber security agency, has issued a report focused on botnets this week titled, "Botnets: Measurement, Detection, Disinfection and Defence." The report questions the reliability of botnet size estimates and provides recommendations and strategies to help organizations fight against botnets. In addition, ENISA published a list of what it considers the top 10 key issues for policymakers, a list derived from internal discussions by security experts in the field of botnets that took place between September and November 2010 and presents a selection of the most interesting results.
Crime

Submission + - Corporate data breach average cost hits $7.2M (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: The cost of a data breach rose to $7.2 million last year from $6.8 million in 2009, with the average cost per compromised record in 2010 reaching $214, up 5% from 2009. The Ponemon Institute's annual study of data loss costs this year looked at 51 organizations who agreed to discuss the impact of losing anywhere between 4,000 to 105,000 customer records.While "negligence" remains the main cause of a data breach (in 41% of cases), for the first time the explanation of "malicious or criminal attacks" (in 31% of cases) came in ahead of the third leading cause, "system failure."
IT

Submission + - A letter on behalf of the world's PC fixers (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: "PC Pro's Steve Cassidy has written a letter on behalf of all the put-upon techies who've ever been called by a friend to fix their PC. His bile is directed at a friend who put a DVD bought on holiday into their laptop, and then wondered what went wrong.

"Once you stuck that DVD in there and started saying 'yes, OK' to every resulting dialog box, you sank the whole thing," Cassidy writes. "It doesn’t take 10 minutes to sort that out; it requires a complete machine reload to properly guarantee the infection is history."

"No, there is no neat and handy way I’ve been keeping secret that allows you to retain your extensive collection of stolen software licences loaded on that laptop. I do disaster recovery, not disaster participation.""

Security

Submission + - The top ten security heroes (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: The media love to stick it to the IT security bad guys: the notorious hackers or the bumbling civil servants who put nothing more than a first-class stamp on a disc containing millions of personal files. But what about the little-known heroes of the security world? PC Pro's Top Ten Security Heroes are the people who have made the internet a (relatively) safe place to work, shop and communicate; the people who work behind the scenes to make sure our PCs aren’t stuffed full of malware. In short, the good guys.

Submission + - Offset bad code with Bad Code Offsets

An anonymous reader writes: Two weeks ago, The Daily WTF's Alex Papadimoulis announced Bad Code Offsets, a join venture between many big names in the software development community (including StackOverflow's Jeff Atwood and Jon Skeet and SourceGear's Eric Sink). The premise is that you can offset bad code by purchasing Bad Code Offsets (much in the same way a carbon-footprint is offset). The profit's are donated to Free Software projects which work eliminate bad code, such as the Apache Foundation and FreeBSD. The first cheques were sent out earlier today.
Security

Council Sells Security Hole On Ebay 147

Barence writes "A security expert was stunned to discover a VPN device he'd bought on Ebay automatically connected to a local council's confidential servers. Bought for just 99p for use at work, when plugged in it automatically connected with the login details which had been carelessly left on the device. 'The whole selling point of the device was that it was extremely easy to configure. It's pretty horrific really,' says the intrusion-detection professional. The council says it is 'deeply concerned' by the news, but is confident that 'multiple layers of security have prevented access to systems and data.'"

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