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Submission + - Alcohol, Not Marijuana, A Gateway Drug (isciencetimes.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: While it may not settle the debate over how drug use begins, researchers found that alcohol, not marijuana, is the gateway drug that leads teens down the path of hard drug use, according to a new study that will be published in the August edition of the Journal of School Health
Patents

Submission + - 3D printing may face legal challenges (idg.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "A coming revolution in 3D printing, with average consumers able to copy and create new three-dimensional objects at home, may lead to attempts by patent holders to expand their legal protections, a paper from Public Knowlege says. Patent holders may see 3D printers as threats, and they may try to sue makers of the printers or the distributors of CAD (computer-aided design) blueprints, according to digital rights group Public Knowledge."
Crime

Why 'Cyber Crime' Should Just Be Called 'Crime' 368

netzar writes "CAUSE executive director Neil Schwartzman, in a post on CircleID, urges governments and law enforcement to treat cyber crime as what it really is: 'crime': 'When someone is mugged, harassed, kidnapped or raped on a sidewalk, we don't call it "sidewalk crime" and call for new laws to regulate sidewalks. It is crime, and those who commit crimes are subject to the full force of the law. For too long, people have referred to spam in dismissive terms: just hit delete, some say, or let the filters take care of it. Others — most of us, in fact — refer to phishing, which is the first step in theft of real money from real people and institutions, as "cyber crime." It's time for that to stop... This isn't just email. This isn't a war. This isn't "cyber." This is crime.'"
Media

Journal Journal: Arcade Fire's HTML5 Experience

There's a neat site for Google Chrome users that shows how artists will be able to liberate themselves from Flash and use HTML5 when the standard is finalized and browser independent (if ever that happens). If you're bored and have five minutes and have speakers/headphones, I hope your childhood address shows enough up on here to make it worth your while. My parent's farmhouse had nothing but my hometown had a couple images that brought me ba
Privacy

Submission + - 9th Circuit: Gov't can track you in secret w/ GPS (time.com)

EmagGeek writes: "Even Time Magazine Online thinks that it's scary that "Government agents can sneak onto your property in the middle of the night, put a GPS device on the bottom of your car and keep track of everywhere you go. This doesn't violate your Fourth Amendment rights, because you do not have any reasonable expectation of privacy in your own driveway — and no reasonable expectation that the government isn't tracking your movements."

"The court went on to make a second terrible decision about privacy: that once a GPS device has been planted, the government is free to use it to track people without getting a warrant."

I guess if you can't afford to put gates and access control around your property, then you have fewer rights than those who can."

Piracy

Submission + - Filesharing "bully" lawyer slapped by regulators (which.co.uk) 1

destinyland writes: A British lawyer's firm sent thousands of letters demanding £500 ($800) damage payments over filesharing, based on IP addresses obtained from ISPs. But now England's Solicitors Regulation Authority is referring that lawyer to a disciplinary tribunal after hearing strong complaints from a consumer watchdog group. Which? Magazine had received testimonials from more than 20 different people who insisted they hadn't actually shared any files, and were being wrongly accused. ("It appears few if any of the recipients have subsequently been successfully prosecuted over the claims," notes one technology blog.) Today the consumer group which publishes the magazine applauded the news of the disciplinary tribunal, "because we've received so many complaints from consumers who believe they been treated appallingly by this law firm." The filesharing could've occurred over unsecure wireless connections, the group argues, and they added that the lawyer's behavior was "both aggressive and bullying."
Software

Submission + - Inkscape 0.48 is out!

ScislaC writes: After 9 months of intensive development, Inkscape 0.48 is out. This version of the SVG-based vector graphics editor brings improved performance and tons of new features, some of which are as follows: Spray Tool, enhanced Text Tool controls (super/subscripts, kerning, spacing, rotation and more), multi-path node editing, greater snapping abilities, custom "auto" swatches, LaTeX PDF export, new and improved extensions, better CMYK & ICC support, and much more. Additionally, it would be wrong to not mention the numerous bug fixes as well.

Check out the full release notes for more information about what has changed, enjoy the screenshots, or just jump right to downloading your package for Windows, Linux or Mac OS X.
Programming

Submission + - Lazy clause algorithm makes decisions faster (itnews.com.au) 1

schliz writes: Australian researchers have developed a 'combinatorial optimisation' algorithm called the lazy clause generator, which combines low- and high- level programming techniques to solve problems like rostering, resource allocation and Sudoku. The algorithm is part of Government-funded NICTA's G12 constraint programming project, and could speed industrial decision making processes by "orders of magnitude" — however, its developer does not expect it to replace human managers "because in the end, people want to feel like they're in control of the process".
Australia

Submission + - Australian Elections Result In Hung Parliament (abc.net.au) 1

ajdlinux writes: For the first time since World War II, Australia has a hung parliament. The future of the Government now lies in the hands of the five independent and Green MPs, who will decide over the next few days which party they will back to form the next government. The Labor Party's National Broadband Network is now in doubt, but it at least seems the internet filter won't go ahead now that the Greens have the balance of power in the Senate.
Censorship

German Photog Wants to Shoot Buildings Excluded From Street View 327

crf00 writes with this report excerpted from Blogoscoped: "'Spiegel reports that German photographer and IT consultant Jens Best wants to personally take snapshots of all those (German) buildings which people asked Google Street View to remove. He then wants to add those photos to Picasa, including GPS coordinates, and in turn re-connect them with Google Maps. Jens believes that for the internet 'we must apply the same rules as we do in the real world. Our right to take panoramic snapshots, for instance, or to take photographs in public spaces, both base laws which determine that one may photograph those things that are visible from public streets and places.' Jens says that for his belief in the right of photographing in public places, as last resort he's even willing to go to jail. Spiegel says Jens already found over 200 people who want to help out in this project and look for removed locations in Google Street View, as there's no official list of such places published by Google."

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