Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - Polish protestor uses drone copter to monitor demo (rawstory.com)

fantomas writes: In recent demonstrations in Warsaw, Poland, a demonstrator has used a drone helicopter spycam, manufactured by Robokopter, to monitor police actions and how they behave towards protestors. Videos show the copter taking off and flying over police lines. A case of man-bites-dog? Is this a first? or do slashdot readers know of similar technology being used by protestors in the USA 'Occupy' movements or elsewhere?

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Indoor Positioning Systems - what op

gshegosh writes: "We have been approached by a customer that needs positioning inside their factory which is about 5000 square meters big. They require 30cm precision. What options are there if it comes to ready-to-use products? We've been considering WiFi fingerprinting but it seems it doesn't have enough precision, using RFID in turn demands putting a few dozen thousand tags all around the factory. Have you heard of any solutions to this problem?"

Submission + - LHC finds 3.5-sigma CP violation in Charm Meson (quantumdiaries.org)

Old Wolf writes: On Monday in Paris, members of the LHCb collaboration presented a 3.5 sigma observation of an unexpected CP violation in the decay of the D0, a particle made up of a charm quark and an up antiquark. TheStandard Model predicts this particular decay has a CP-violating asymmetry close to zero, yet LHCb observed a much larger value of -0.82 percent.

Here's a more technical writeup, as well as the actual presentation.

GNOME

Submission + - Linux Mint 12 tries to appeal to users disappointe (linuxmint.com)

gshegosh writes: "The disappointed part of Ubuntu and Gnome user community is quite vocal. Both Unity and Gnome Shell break "compatibility" with user old habits of having window-oriented, customizable desktop environment instead of Apple-style app-oriented, locked one.
There are some that try to hold on to Gnome 2 (there's even a fork) but it will get harder while time passes by and more and more applications use GTK3.
Linux Mint developers have recently revealed that they are working on extensions that will make new Gnome look and feel more traditional way. Will it make disgruntled users happy? Will Mint replace Ubuntu as #1 distribution? I for one am sure going to try it out."

GNOME

Submission + - Linux Mint 12 tries to appeal to users disappointe (linuxmint.com)

gshegosh writes: "The disappointed part of Ubuntu and Gnome user community is quite vocal. Both Unity and Gnome Shell break "compatibility" with user old habits of having window-oriented, customizable desktop environment instead of Apple-style app-oriented, locked one.
There are some that try to hold on to Gnome 2 (there's even a fork) but it will get harder while time passes by and more and more applications use GTK3.
Linux Mint developers have recently revealed that they are working on extensions that will make new Gnome look and feel more traditional way. Will it make disgruntled users happy? Will Mint replace Ubuntu as #1 distribution? I for one am sure going to try it out."

The Almighty Buck

Average Budget For Major, Multi-Platform Games Is $18-28 Million 157

An anonymous reader passes along this excerpt from Develop: "The average development budget for a multiplatform next-gen game is $18-$28 million, according to new data. A study by entertainment analyst group M2 Research also puts development costs for single-platform projects at an average of $10 million. The figures themselves may not be too surprising, with high-profile games often breaking the $40 million barrier. Polyphony's Gran Turismo 5 budget is said to be hovering around the $60 million mark, while Modern Warfare 2's budget was said to be as high as $50 million."
Google

Google Mistook Jackson Searches For Net Attack 256

Slatterz writes "Web giant Google has admitted it thought the sudden spike in searches for Michael Jackson on Thursday was a massive, coordinated internet attack, leading it to post an error page on Google News. The company's director of product management, RJ Pittman, explained that search volume began to increase around 2pm PDT on Thursday and 'skyrocketed' by 3pm, finally stabilising at around 8pm. According to Pittman, last week also saw one of the largest mobile search spikes ever seen, with 5 of the top 20 searches about Jackson. Google wasn't the only site caught out by the extraordinary events. The Los Angeles Times web site also crashed soon after it broke the news of Jackson's death."
The Internet

Judge Thinks Linking To Copyrighted Material Should Be Illegal 390

An article at TechCrunch discusses a blog post from Richard Posner, a US Court of Appeals judge, about the struggling newspaper industry. Posner explains why he thinks the newspapers will continue to struggle, and then comes to a rather unusual conclusion: "Expanding copyright law to bar online access to copyrighted materials without the copyright holder's consent, or to bar linking to or paraphrasing copyrighted materials without the copyright holder's consent, might be necessary to keep free riding on content financed by online newspapers from so impairing the incentive to create costly news-gathering operations that news services like Reuters and the Associated Press would become the only professional, nongovernmental sources of news and opinion."

Slashdot Top Deals

The UNIX philosophy basically involves giving you enough rope to hang yourself. And then a couple of feet more, just to be sure.

Working...