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Submission + - What Will Servers Look Like in the Future? ( 2

miller60 writes: "Servers are going to be very different in the future than they are today,” says Joe Kava, who runs Google's data centers. “I think servers will look dramatically different." Kava is among the data center experts predicting that server design will evolve — and perhaps change radically — to meet the demands for warmer data centers and better energy efficiency. "We need to think in terms of an entirely different form factor,” said one panelist. What might new server designs look like?

Submission + - GAO Sting Finds More Fake Military Parts From China ( 1

Nidi62 writes: The GAO, through a fictitious company, recently requisitioned parts from China in order to determine if the Chinese government was living up to its promises of battling counterfiet parts. The report from the GAO found that "
334 of 396 vendors who offered to sell parts to the fictitious company were from China" and that "
all 16 parts eventually purchased by the fake company came from 13 China-based vendors and all were determined by an independent testing laboratory to be counterfeit." The parts requested were supposedly for use in F-15s, MV-22 Ospreys, and nuclear submarines, and were asked to be new parts. It also says that over the past 3 years, over 1 million counterfeit parts have been found to have come from Chinese companies. This stands in sharp contrast to the Chinese government's promise to clamp down on the production of counterfeit parts in China


Submission + - Warehouse robots come of age as Amazon buys Kiva ( 1

MrSeb writes: "In Kurt Vonnegut’s 'Player Piano,' workers displaced by robots find themselves with an abundance of material goods but a lack of jobs. Watching robots like those from Kiva — recently acquired by Amazon for nearly a billion dollars — zip around warehouses fetching products, it’s easy to wonder whether his dark vision of the future is becoming part of ours. The last 50 years have seen dramatic advances in robotic technology and machines have been made suitable for a dramatically increased number of tasks. The path hasn’t been smooth, though, and it hasn’t proceeded in a way anyone expected, but robots are coming of age in one area after another — most recently warehouse automation. Warehouse robots are a logical evolution of the conveyor belt. They are highly mobile and capable of navigating themselves around the complex environment of a distribution facility. Often they have no arms at all, and simply act as glorified, motorized hydraulic jacks, ferrying loads from one place to another. If you've ever wondered how Amazon keeps its prices low, here's your answer: It's the robots."

Submission + - Researchers Take Down 110k Strong Khelios P2P Botnet (

tsu doh nimh writes: Experts from across the security industry collaborated this week to quarantine more than 110,000 Microsoft Windows PCs that were infected with the Khelios worm, a contagion that forces infected PCs to blast out junk email advertising rogue Internet pharmacies. But within hours of the takedown, miscreants launched Khelios.C, a new version that appears to be spreading via Facebook links.

Submission + - Adobe to tax speed of Flash 3D (

An anonymous reader writes: Adobe announced today that they are adding "premium features" to the Flash Player. Instead, they are actually preventing usage of already existing features, and make your pay for it. These features were used by many game developers to get speed boost for memory manipulation. Now you have to pay back 9% of your revenues to Adobe in order to get decent speed.

Submission + - What book publishers should learn from Harry Potter (

Volanin writes: The e-book versions of Harry Potter are being released through Pottermore, and Rowling has chosen to do a number of interesting things with them, including releasing them without DRM restrictions.

One of the encouraging things about the Pottermore launch is that the books will be available on virtually every platform simultaneously, including the Sony Reader, the Nook, the Kindle and Google’s e-book service.

Even Amazon has bowed to the power of the series and done what would previously have seemed unthinkable: it sends users who come to the titles on Amazon to Pottermore to finish the transaction.


Submission + - Ivy Bridge Quad-Core Desktop and Mobile CPUs launching on April 29 (

techfun89 writes: "Intel will be introducing a number of new Ivy Bridge processors for desktops and mobile systems during the week of April 22-28, becoming available April 29. Originally the 29th was set as the quad-core desktop launch but now both versions of the chips will be debuting at the same time.

The core i7-3720QM and 3820QM chips that are released on April 29th appear to be good successors to the ones in current high-end 15 and 17-inch MacBook Pro units. Apple has reported that they will be slimming down the 13 and 15-inch models, so its not determined as of yet, how these changes will affect cpu decision making.

The launch on June 3rd expands the mobile computer front, adding six dual-core Core i5 and Core i7 processors, as well as a pair of ultra-low voltage dual-core chips. In the third quarter of 2012 there will be lower-end Core i3 processors to follow."


Submission + - FBI Taught Agents They Could 'Bend or Suspend the Law' | Danger Room | (

politkal writes: According to the FBI's internal inquiry on counterterrorism training, the FBI taught agents that the Bureau "has the ability to bend or suspend the law to impinge on the freedoms of others"; that agents should "never attempt to shake hands with an Asian"; that Arabs were "prone to outbursts" of a "Jekyll & Hyde" nature.

Submission + - Kelihos 2 Crushed by Security Firms (

judgecorp writes: "The second version of the Kelihos botnet has been put out of action by security firms including Kasperskly labs. Bigger than the first Kelihos, which was taken out last year with a Microsoft court order, Kelihos 2 was taken down by a "sinkholing" operation which took out the peer-to-peer botnet piece by piece."

Submission + - Google is being pressured by UK govt to make it easier to delete links (

politkal writes: "An influential group of UK lawmakers has called on Google to introduce an algorithm to remove search links found to be in breach of privacy — or face legislation to force it to do so.

It follows complaints from ex-Formula One boss Max Mosley about the difficulty he faced in getting a video removed from the internet.

The search giant argued it was not its job to monitor net content.

The cross-party committee said this argument was "totally unconvincing".

The report by a committee of MPs and peers was commissioned by the government to look into privacy and free speech issues after a series of high profile super-injunctions were made public last year.

Celebrities including Ryan Giggs found that gagging orders against newspapers were routinely flouted online. In Mr Giggs' case, the details of his super-injunction were mentioned at least 75,000 times on Twitter, the committee said.

Its report said that online firms needed to be brought in line with offline media in such cases.

"We recommend that, when granting an injunction, courts should be proactive in directing the claimant to serve notice on internet content platforms such as Twitter and Facebook," it said.

Some of the harshest criticism was reserved for Google.

"Where an individual has obtained a clear court order that certain material infringes their privacy and so should not be published, we do not find it acceptable that he or she should have to return to court repeatedly in order to remove the same material from internet searches," the report said."
more at the source url...


Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How to feed Africa? (

gbrumfiel writes: "Africa has some of the poorest soil of anywhere on the earth, and over farming is only making matters worse. As the population grows, governments and NGOs must decide whether to subsidize chemical fertilizers like those used in the west or promote more sustainable agricultural practices. In Malawi, the government has decided to subsidize fertilizers, with impressive results. Corn yields have tripled since the subsidies were introduced. More sustainable practices, such as fertilizer trees can't deliver those kind of results in just a few years. The question is simple: does Africa follow the same, unsustainable road as the rest of the world? Or do they become a testing ground for potentially game-changing new techniques? OR is there a third path? Discuss."

Submission + - Huawei NZ almost certainly a front for Chinese intelligence - defence analyst (

politkal writes: "Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei — involved in a $1.35 billion Ultrafast Broadband project in New Zealand — is almost certainly a front for Chinese intelligence, a defence analyst claims.
That's the collective view of the security community in the US, Britain and Australia, according to Auckland-based defence analyst Paul Buchanan, who says it would be prudent for Prime Minister John Key to listen to them." Secondary source:

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