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Comment Re:Your post doesn't smell right... (Score 1) 298

I didn't even know what ORMs and URMs were, had to look it up.
He is a white male, and he still works there. So I am about 99.99867% sure you were exaggerating when you said "all".

I work with plenty of minorities, always have for 23 years at large and small companies. I have never ever seen preferential treatment towards or against minorities. I have always seen where we hire the best people we can given the constraints. Sometimes that was hiring a contract team instead of full-time employees, and sometimes they were offshore/nearshore, everyone from the US to Ukraine to Mexico to India. But the bottom line was that those teams were always temporary, and employees were protected when cuts were required.

That is the thing about technology, we always want the best people we can get to do the work - I really don't care where they are from or what they look like.

Comment Re:Walmart WAS a tech leader ... (Score 1) 65

You are confusing "technology" with "IT Sector". Those are two completely different things. Wal-Mart was innovating with technology a long time ago, increasing efficiency and automating a lot of information flow - for their own purposes. I thought all that was widely known. I think that they weren't quite as prepared for the web presence, and although they were in it early, they don't dominate like other players. I remember reading about how they deployed RFID to their warehouses to track trucks, and how they optimized shipping routes, etc. All high-tech, but not necessarily consumer facing.

Having said that, I don't shop there unless I absolutely need something quickly that nobody else around has... maybe 2 or 3 times a year. IT people or managers might be paid well, but my brother used to work for them and he absolutely hated it. As soon as he could find something else he left. They kept him at a certain number of hours to avoid having to offer insurance. If there is one thing I haven't heard about Wal-Mart, it's that they treat their employees well.

Comment Your post doesn't smell right... (Score 4, Informative) 298

I have a friend who is celebrating his 21st year at Intel. He has considered leaving a few times, but just couldn't because they take such good care of him. He gets stock options that come out to about 1/3 of my salary, he makes very good money, usually gets double-digit raises and bonuses that are about 1/4 to 1/3 my salary.

Every seven years, he gets a paid 3-month sabbatical, in addition to vacation. This year will be his 3rd one. He had to move once for the company, and when he did they pretty much covered every expense.

Quite honestly, I have known a couple of other people who have worked there, and none of them complained about it.
What I was told about Intel was that they take care of their employees, and during hard times (like during the economic downturn) they take better care of them. It's how they keep good people. I always respected them for that. I can't say as much for any software or financial company that I have worked for in the last 24 years.

Comment have a few, but easy call for me.... (Score 1) 299

At a small company in 2005 I was hired as the QA manager, I moved across the country for this small startup that had been around for 6 or 7 years. I was told I would get to hire my team of 7 and build the QA team and processes. For 8 months I was the only QA person and was told I couldn't hire anyone. Then suddenly I was asked why I hadn't hired my team yet. So I started interviewing... requirements were 3-5 yrs experience. Interviewed, made offers, nobody was accepting. As the hiring manager, my boss wouldn't let me in on how much the position paid. When I finally found out, I know why nobody was accepting - $30k. I finally convinced him to increase the salary, and I was able to hire two people. Not 7.

When I joined the company, my wife was pregnant with our first child. I talked to my boss, and asked if I could take some vacation days / sick days when the baby came. He said of course, that he had kids, and he totally understood. He was genuinely nice about it and I felt better. My wife had the baby, we had to do an emergency c-section, and everything was fine. That was on a Saturday, and I had planned to take the week after off. On Tuesday, the 2nd day I was off, I got a call from a co-worker saying my boss was flipping out, asking where the hell I was, saying I had to be in the office immediately. I said I couldn't and that my wife needed me as we had no family there. I went in on Thursday, and my boss was a total asshole to me. There was nothing urgent going on at all either, he just wanted me there.

After about a year of putting some kind of QA process with my 2 person team in place at this small company, I was told "You need to automate all of our testing". Then I was told that I could have no budget, couldn't hire any automation people, and had to do it in my spare time without any impacts to other schedules. I explained that it was possible to do, but not with those constraints. I even made some suggestions about how to approach it given those constraints. That wasn't good enough, so I set about busting my ass trying to do it. I was working 60+ hours a week, and making some headway. Two months later a new product manager was hired, and I was told to train him on our product as well. I came in the Monday after a long July4th weekend, and I couldn't log in. Then I was called into the conference room and was fired. I had a bad attitude, and when I was told to do something I should just say "yes". I calmly explained that what they asked me to do wasn't possible, and that's when I found out that the "product manager" I trained was my replacement, and he was going to take my position and do that automation. I said "I guarantee you that he won't".

I kept in touch with friends there. Three months later, the new QA manager was fired. They promoted the first person I hired to manager. She wasn't happy about it. She was fired after a month, followed by the rest of the QA team. Within a year the entire company folded. The promised IPO never happened, the multi-millionaire president-and-founder slunk back to his mansion, and the executives [my boss included] went on to other shady ventures.

I learned a lot there, but it was all mostly how NOT to be a manager.

Comment You are talking about sequels... (Score 1) 542

I can think of a couple of sequels, or movies in a series, that I liked just as much or maybe more than previous movies.

Toy Story 3 is my favorite in that series.
Logan is my favorite of the X-Men franchise.
I think that these two did need the previous movies to give them the full context though.

Batman Begins dwarfs all previous attempts to tell that story, and The Dark Knight was fantastic.

Rise of and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes were great and much less corny than the original, although they were prequels.

Comment This is just business... and Linux sucks at it (Score 1) 203

And that is how it should be.
Because businesses will come and go (even Microsoft), but the truly innovative and useful things are sustainable.

It is like the monk walking with his teacher, and they see a rabbit being chased by a fox.
The student says "That poor rabbit will get eaten".
The teacher asks "Why do you think so?"
"Because the fox is much faster, stronger, and more cunning".
The teacher says "But the rabbit will elude him".
"Why is that teacher?"
"Because the fox is running for his dinner, but the rabbit is running for his life"

Comment So... the US really is only a blip on this survey (Score 1) 244

Looks like maybe providers need to make the content available to those countries who are watching that "pirated" content.

It really seems to me that this is more about content not being available, so people find ways to get it. While Netflix/Amazon may be available in some of those countries, do they get the full list of shows/movies, or just a pittance? I know it is likely due to copyright law restrictions, but that should serve as a wake up call that those restrictions are not helping the copyright holders.

They sure threw the word pirate around a lot in the article. It would be interesting to see a definition of what they call "pirated".

Comment Did everyone else catch this? (Score 1) 519

Indeed, it is in some cases a federal crime to disclose a wiretap without authorization, including not only the information obtained from the wiretap, but also the mere existence of a wiretap with an intent to obstruct it. With respect to intelligence wiretaps, there is an additional issue: They are always classified, and disclosure of classified information is also generally a crime.

Effectively, this is saying that if there was a wiretap and Trump disclosed it without authorization, he could have committed a crime.
I have wondered if there were taps, maybe it was simply on the Russians and the fact that they were talking with Trump could have been a coincidence unrelated to the election. With all the shit Russia pulls, I would kind of hope our Gov was keeping tabs on them.

Comment Re:I do not.. come up with a good story scheme... (Score 1) 415

it's what I've used for years. I have a not so memorable story, take an event from that, and turn it into your password scheme.

[completely fabricated example]
In 7th grade a girl I liked (Sarah) gave a presentation on Abraham Lincoln. She was wearing a blue dress.
Four score and blue dress. FoScBlDr (8 characters, safe)
Add in a number and a symbol, because some sites require it. FoScBlDr81? [I think it was in 1981]

So, there is my starting password. Password hint = Sarah Lincoln 81, maybe SL81 for short.
6 months later, you have to change your password. Hint becomes SL82 (FoScBlDr82?)
You could cycle through to 89, then back to 81. Over time, you can morph it in other ways. Maybe put a $ in there instead of a ? for financial sites, or come up with a separate story for those.

The thing is, YOU make up the story and the cycling rules.
You can even write down your password hints, nobody would ever think "Crush 88" was actually "FoScBlDr88?"

I have used one scheme/password since 1999, and it has morphed so much even if I told someone my original password, they couldn't guess what it is now... it's just jibberish.

This is pretty good, but it runs into the password re-use problem. Which is a real problem, because you don't have any say in how securely the password is stored in the service's database. If your yahoo password gets compromised, that's a real issue. But if your compromised yahoo password will also let people into your gmail and etrade accounts, it's a disaster.

You are correct. I alluded to but didn't make it clear that I can use the same scheme, but different password, for different sites.
e.g. for one site it may be "99 Crush", which would be "?99FoScBlDr" (change the number, and move it and the ? to the front)
I just posted off the top of my head anyway, if you put a little thought into it, it becomes more secure. And using your example, if someone cracked my yahoo password and it was "FoScBlDr82?", how would they ever figure out that my gmail password is "FoScBlDr88?" ? OK, so maybe they could decide to increment the number and get lucky. What if I make my scheme to rotate the number and the letter before it? FoScBlDr81?, FoScBlDs82?, FoScBlDt83?, etc.

My point is that it can be obscure and memorable, but only to you. Unless you share your made up algorithm, or expose a simple pattern, which can't really be figured out unless someone gets multiple versions of the password. I am not saying it's perfect, but I think it is a good way to do it. It's worked for me anyway.

I still remember a password that an intern at my first company used. He gave it to me when he left in case I needed it. It was "CIrpotb,"
He liked Pearl Jam, and it was from a lyric in one of their popular songs.

Comment I do not.. come up with a good story scheme... (Score 3, Interesting) 415

it's what I've used for years. I have a not so memorable story, take an event from that, and turn it into your password scheme.

[completely fabricated example]
In 7th grade a girl I liked (Sarah) gave a presentation on Abraham Lincoln. She was wearing a blue dress.
Four score and blue dress. FoScBlDr (8 characters, safe)
Add in a number and a symbol, because some sites require it. FoScBlDr81? [I think it was in 1981]

So, there is my starting password. Password hint = Sarah Lincoln 81, maybe SL81 for short.
6 months later, you have to change your password. Hint becomes SL82 (FoScBlDr82?)
You could cycle through to 89, then back to 81. Over time, you can morph it in other ways. Maybe put a $ in there instead of a ? for financial sites, or come up with a separate story for those.

The thing is, YOU make up the story and the cycling rules.
You can even write down your password hints, nobody would ever think "Crush 88" was actually "FoScBlDr88?"

I have used one scheme/password since 1999, and it has morphed so much even if I told someone my original password, they couldn't guess what it is now... it's just jibberish.

Comment Um... the future is now. (Score 1) 457

Not surprising, some people today are just as ignorant about computers.

Though it scares me to think I may be ignorant about some FUTURE tech that comes out when I'm old.

Future? I feel that way about some current tech.

I tell you, I have been using computers since the TRS-80 model III in the mid 80s, and I still feel ignorant about computers some days.
During one job interview I was asked about my experience on Linux. I said I have been using it as my home system since 1999, and I ran it and tested on it at a few jobs I had over the years. The interviewer said "oh, so you're an expert?" I replied "I think that the more I use it, and the more I learn about it, the more I realize how much I don't know about it. It's always evolving. I used to build my own kernel, and compile my own packages - and I still do that on occasion because I find it interesting. I can always dig in as deep as I want to go. But no, I don't think I am an expert and I never will be."

That wasn't just an interview answer, I firmly believe that. Everything seems so much deeper today. The IT industry has grown so much. Cryptography, mobile, security, hacks, viruses/malware, gaming, containers, cloud, GPUs, etc etc. The industry has really matured in the last 25 years, which really is a short time compared to other industries, and it permeates so much. There is no doubt in my mind that I will continue to slip away from understanding it all.

Comment Re:Is any of this new? (Score 1) 457

1) The CIA has the ability to break into Android and iPhone handsets, and all kinds of computers.

That's part of the spying thing and has been for at least the last 2-3 decades.

Yep. I worked at Motorola in the early to late 90s, in the cellular division. We built the infrastructure platforms for bag/car/mobile phones.
One fine day, there were some suits there for meetings. When we asked management what it was about, we were told it was a government project around Iridium (satellite phones) and it couldn't be discussed. Word around the office was that it was actually to make sure there were allowances built into our systems for wiretapping. I never saw any real evidence of it, but there wouldn't really be a way to know. I think then it was less around the handset and more about the infrastructure.

I think it would be naive to believe the government wouldn't do that, and even more so to think it wasn't still happening 20+ years later.

Comment I love the music industry today... (Score 1) 167

Wait.
I don't mean the mainstream music industry.
I don't stream music. I have a band I really like I have pre-ordered their last few CDs because they kick ass. (Clutch)
For the most part, I have been finding new/old music on Youtube. I can find channels I like, find artists I like, get recommendations, etc. I can also rip channel playlists from youtube, burn them to a CD as mp3 so I can listen in my car. I have found plenty of stuff I like that way, and if I really like them I can buy their album on whatever site they list it on and support the artists. Hell, they might be in some other country. Or if it's old stuff, I can usually find the whole album on youtube and get it with tools like youtube-dl.

So I like the music industry that the internet created, the one that actually promotes music and supports artists.

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