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Android

Submission + - Sony Reader T1 Hack Now ut (the-digital-reader.com) 1

Nate the greatest writes: The Sony Reader PRS-T1 joined the Nook Touch as a hacked E-ink Android tablet today. A new hack has been posted online by the developer who shot the proof-of-concept video last week. It's still a little rough and there's not a whole lot included in it, but the hack is ready for the end-user.

It won't let me install anything, unfortunately. I've tried to install the Kindle app as well as the Amazon Appstore. Neither worked. But I think the hack is still worth installing; it's safe and bound to improve over the next few weeks.

Submission + - Lying About Your Military Record Ruled Free Speech

Hugh Pickens writes writes: ""I'm a retired Marine of 25 years," said Xavier Alvarez soon after he was elected to the board of the Three Valleys Municipal Water District in Claremont, CA. "Back in 1987, I was awarded the congressional Medal of Honor." Alvarez's lie about the Medal of Honor put him in violation of the Stolen Valor Act of 2005, a law passed by Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush that prohibits anyone from falsely claiming "to have been awarded any decoration or medal authorized by Congress for the armed forces of the United States." Alvarez's "semper fraud" led to a criminal conviction, which was later thrown out by the US. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco which found that the Stolen Valor Act was an unconstitutional restriction of free speech. Now the US Supreme Court has agreed to to decide whether the Constitution's free speech clause protects people who falsely claim to have been awarded military medals. Jonathon Turley writes in the LA Times that however distasteful, with the Stolen Valor Act, Congress has made it possible to jail someone simply for telling a lie. "The Alvarez case could establish a legal principle that would allow Congress to criminalize virtually any fib, which could lead to a sweeping new form of regulating speech in the United States," writes Turley. "Giving the government such power would allow it to target "liars" who it portrays as endangering or dishonoring society.""
Apple

Submission + - Apple's iPad Dominance Fades (pcworld.com)

PolygamousRanchKid writes: On an earnings call earlier this week, Apple revealed that iPad shipments for the most recent calendar quarter rose to 11.12 million units, compared to 9.2 million in the previous quarter. That news, though, was offset Friday by a report from Strategy Analytics that the iPad's share of the global tablet market—previously a domineering 96 percent—had fallen to 67 percent. Meanwhile, Android tabs had grown their market share to 27 percent. "It is clear that the iPad is experiencing slowing growth," observed IDC analyst Tom Mainelli in a research note today. He reasoned that if Apple wants maintain past shipment levels, it's going to have to appeal to mainstream consumers. For them, he continued, $500 for a tablet is a hard sell, even harder in the face of the competition like Amazon's upcoming $199 Kindle Fire.So if Apple wants to compete in that mainstream market, Mainelli maintained, it's going to need to augment its media tablet lineup with lower-priced products. "Following this strategy," he explained, "we might see Apple offer the current $499 16GB/WiFi-only Apple iPad 2 at $399 or less after it launches the iPad 3 at $499 and up."
Botnet

Submission + - Most Sophisticated Rootkit Getting An Overhaul (itworld.com)

jfruhlinger writes: "TDL4, a rootkit that helps build a powerful botnet, is pegged by security vendor ESET as one of the most sophisticated pieces of malware in the world. But its creators aren't resting on their laurels; they're rewriting some of the code from the ground up to make it difficult for antimalware to detect it, creating a hidden boot partition that gaurantees that malware code will be loaded even before the operating system is. It's part of a plan to turn TDL4 into a turnkey product that can be sold to other criminal operations."

Submission + - Nasdaq intrusion spreads to listed companies

SpzToid writes: "Nasdaq's Directors Desk is a program sold to listed and private companies, whose board members use it to share documents and communicate with executives. Apparently Directors Desk was infected during a breach widely publicized earlier this year. It has now become known that hackers were able to access confidential documents and communications of the corporate directors and board members who received this infected application, said Tom Kellermann, chief technology officer with security technology firm AirPatrol Corp. It is unclear how long the Directors Desk application was infected before the exchange identified the breach, according to Kellermann and another source."

Can Anyone Beat WoW? 365

Next Generation is running an article penned by DFC Intelligence Analyst David Cole, exploring the overwhelming popularity of World of Warcraft. Coles asks Is It Possible to Surpass World of Warcraft? He explores the reasons behind WoW's success, and what it means for the market as a whole. From the article: "All of these factors point towards one conclusion: World of Warcraft's success, admirable as it may be, will be extremely difficult to duplicate. This will be bad news for all the frothy investors who are suddenly discovering the MMOG business model. In the new DFC Intelligence Online Game Market report we forecast revenue in the MMOG market to grow over 150% from 2006 to 2011. However, this doesn't account for all the investment money that is likely to be lost chasing after that revenue growth."

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