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Submission + - Debian dropping support for older CPUs (distrowatch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: According to a report on DistroWatch, the Debian distribution will soon be dropping support for older, 32-bit processors: "The Debian project supports a wide range of hardware architectures, including 32-bit x86 CPUs. Changes are happening in Debian's development branches which will make older versions of the 32-bit architecture obsolete. Ben Hutchings provides the details: 'Last year it was decided to increase the minimum CPU features for the i386 architecture to 686-class in the Stretch release cycle. This means dropping support for 586-class and hybrid 586/686 processors. (Support for 486-class processors was dropped, somewhat accidentally, in Squeeze.) This was implemented in the Linux kernel packages starting with Linux 4.3, which was uploaded to Unstable in December last year. In case you missed that change, GCC for i386 has recently been changed to target 686-class processors and is generating code that will crash on other processors. Any such systems still running Testing or Unstable will need to be switched to run Stable (Jessie).' A list of processors which will no longer be supported after Debian "Jessie" can be found in Hutchings' mailing list post."

Submission + - Canadian Music Industry Faces Competition Complaint Over Public Domain Records (michaelgeist.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: A Canadian record label specializing in public domain releases has filed a complaint with the Competition Tribunal over alleged anti-competitive conduct by Universal, Sony, and host of other music industry leaders. The complaint tells a fascinating behind-the-scenes tale, with the recording industry doing everything in its powers — including posting false reviews, pressuring distributors, and lobbying for changes to the law — to stop the sale of competing public domain records.
Networking

Submission + - If you think you can ignore IPv6, think again. (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: It’s official. The IANA(Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) this week allocated the last IP address blocks from the global IPv4 central address pool.

While the last IPv4 addresses have been allocated, it’s expected to take several months for regional registries to consume all their remaining regional IPv4 address pool.

The IPv6 Forum, a group with the mission to educate and promote the new protocol, says that enabling IPv6 in all ICT environment is not the end game, but is now a critical requirement for continuity in all Internet business and services going forward.

Experts believe that the move to IPv6 should be a board-level risk management concern, equivalent to the Y2K problem or Sarbanes-Oxley compliance. During the late 1990s, technology companies worldwide scoured their source code for places where critical algorithms assumed a two-digit date. This seemingly trivial software development issue was of global concern, so many companies made Y2K compliance a strategic initiative. The transition to IPv6 is of similar importance.

If you think you can ignore IPv6, think again.

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