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Science

Submission + - Waste heat to Electricity Breakthrough (sciencedaily.com)

drewsup writes: Researchers at Northwestern University have placed nanocrystals of rock salt into lead telluride, creating a material that can harness electricity from heat-generating items such as vehicle exhaust systems, industrial processes and equipment and sun light more efficiently than scientists have seen in the past
"It has been known for 100 years that semiconductors have this property that can harness electricity," said Mercouri Kanatzidis, the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor of Chemistry in The Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. "To make this an efficient process, all you need is the right material, and we have found a recipe or system to make this material." Read the story at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110118143228.htm

Submission + - Transparant Aluminum Finally a Reality (sciencedaily.com)

drewsup writes: Science Daily has a story,(http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110110121709.htm), on a new class of metallic glass that is stronger than steel. The real news is that even stronger versions will follow soon. Que the Scotty jokes..

Submission + - New "Hairy" material is perfectly hyrophobic. 2

drewsup writes: As quoted in Daily Science, Wolfgang Sigmund, a professor of materials science and engineering at University of Florida, has created a material modeled after spider hairs. A paper about the surface, which works equally well with hot or cold water, appears in this month's edition of the journal Langmuir.

Spiders use their water-repelling hairs to stay dry or avoid drowning, with water spiders capturing air bubbles and toting them underwater to breathe. Potential applications for UF's ultra-water-repellent surfaces are many, Sigmund said. When water scampers off the surface, it picks up and carries dirt with it, in effect making the surface self-cleaning. As such, it is ideal for some food packaging, or windows, or solar cells that must stay clean to gather sunlight, he said. Boat designers might coat hulls with it, making boats faster and more efficient. Hairy glass anyone?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100224132639.htm

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