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Submission + - A solution for DDOS packet flooding attacks (oceanpark.com)

dgallard writes: On October 21, 2016, a DDOS attack crippled access to major Web sites including Amazon and Netflix.

PEIP (Path Enhanced IP) extends the IP protocol to enable determining the router path of packets sent to a target host. Currently, there is no information to indicate which routers a packet traversed on its way to a destination (DDOS target) enabling use of forged source IP addresses to attack the target via packet flooding.

PEIP changes all that. Rather than attempting to prevent attack packets, instead, PEIP provides a way to rate-limit all packets based on their router path to a destination. In this way, DDOS attacks can be thwarted be simply only allowing them a limited amount of bandwith.

Submission + - How are all these IoT devices on public address space to be hacked? 1

ChesterRafoon writes: Nearly all of these IoT devices mentioned in the latest internet bot attacks are consumer devices — webcams, thermostats, DVRs, things like that. Most consumer (home) network setups would host these kinds of devices on private address space behind a NAT box of some type. So how on earth where all these devices exposed to the WAN so that telnet (of all things) could attempt to connect and hijack them?

Submission + - China surpasses U.S. in iOS App Store revenue (bizjournals.com)

Murpatrick writes: Gaming is a large contributor to iOS revenue in China, while other prominent categories include Entertainment and Social Networking. Video streaming apps are also having a major impact on China’s Entertainment category as a whole. App Annie expects non-games will also experience revenue growth due to in-app subscriptions.

Submission + - Spare the Screen Time, Spoil the Child?

theodp writes: For years, the conventional wisdom has been that too much screen time is bad for kids. Indeed, the Obamas famously limited their 11- and 14-year-old daughters' use of technology to weekends, and banned watching TV on weekdays. But now, Engadget reports, new guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics studies suggest we were wrong about limiting children's screen time. So, with new Google-Gallup research suggesting that students deprived of daily use of a computer at home are placed at a disadvantage when it comes to learning CS, could it be that the President's well-intentioned screen time limits contributed to his daughters' failure to take to coding in the way he'd like? Might he have been better off to emulate the Onion's 'Craig Georges' ("I've never once considered monitoring my child’s screen time. I guess I’m a better parent than I realized.")?

Submission + - How a deftly crafted botnet toppled top internet sites (networkworld.com)

tdog17 writes: Attacks that overwhelmed the internet-address lookup service provided by Dyn were well coordinated and carefully plotted to take down data centers all over the globe, preventing customers from reaching more than 1,200 domains Dyn was in charge of.

Submission + - Online Security: 19% of social media accounts associated with top ten brands are (skyrock.com)

nathanblanch writes: Fake brand social media accounts are on the rise according to a study into the shape of the industry from Proofpoint.

From April through June 2016, the 10 top brands across different industries were identified and analysed across Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram. A total of 4,840 brands were found to be associated with these companies – almost a fifth (19 per cent) were fraudulent.

Social media is reportedly a prime platform for fraud. Used as a corporate marketing and communications tool, it can be hijacked with malicious intent such as spamming users and misrepresenting the brand.

Of the 902 fraudulent accounts associated with 10 top brands, nearly 30 per cent were scams or offers for counterfeit products and services. Furthermore, four per cent of these were either phishing for user information, looking to install malware, protesting against the company in question or parodying it – which it claimed could harm the reputation of the brands.

These were BMW, Capital One, Chanel, Amazon, DirecTV, Nike, Samsung, Shell, Sony, Starbucks as selected by the Brand Directory list of top brands for 2015.

The report said: “Many unauthorised accounts are fake brand accounts. They are created solely to defraud your customers or undermine your brand. Bad actors create these accounts for financial gain or to protest your company and create negative brand sentiment.

“Other fraudsters prey on customers who try to engage with your brand. They target customers using fake customer service accounts, phony sweepstakes, and more. Some are motivated by a political agenda and create fraudulent accounts to attack a brand’s image. Most often, they closely imitate the brand to make fun of the company or its customers. These protest accounts diminish brand value and create a negative or even hostile experience for customers.”

The most common fraud practices included offering free gifts or discounts, or posing as customer support or software updates.

A flaw was also identified with Facebook and Twitter verification which can help with capturing the spammers – while the seal is viewable on the profile it is not always readily viewable on individual tweets and posts.

Social media phishing is the fastest-growing social media threat, increasing 150 per cent from 2015 to 2016.

Submission + - SPAM: Children inherit their intelligence from their mother not their father

schwit1 writes: A mother's genetics determines how clever her children are, according to researchers, and the father makes no difference.

Women are more likely to transmit intelligence genes to their children because they are carried on the X chromosome and women have two of these, while men only have one.

But in addition to this, scientists now believe genes for advanced cognitive functions which are inherited from the father may be automatically deactivated.

A category of genes known as “conditioned genes” are thought to work only if they come from the mother in some cases and the father in other cases. Intelligence is believed to be among the conditioned genes that have to come from the mother.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: Mylan to Settle EpiPen Overpricing Case for $465 Million

schwit1 writes: Mylan, the maker of the allergy treatment EpiPen, said Friday that it had reached a $465 million settlement with the Justice Department and other government agencies over questions on whether the company had overcharged Medicaid for the treatment by improperly classifying it as a generic drug.

The federal government said this week that Mylan had been told multiple times that it was wrongly classifying the EpiPen, which led the Medicaid and Medicare programs to overpay for the product. Although it has not been disclosed how much it had overpaid, officials said spending on the EpiPen totaled nearly $1.3 billion from 2011 to 2015.

Mylan has been under intense scrutiny since the summer for raising the price of EpiPen to more than $600 for a pack of two from about $100 since it bought the product in 2007.

In a statement, Mylan said the settlement did not imply any admission of wrongdoing. It also said the settlement had not been finalized, and that it expected to enter into a corporate integrity agreement with the Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - AT&T Considers Stopping All Samsung Note 7 Sales (bloomberg.com)

An anonymous reader writes: AT&T Inc. is considering stopping all sales of Samsung Electronics Co.’s flagship Galaxy Note 7 over concerns about the smartphone’s safety, according to a person familiar with the situation. A final decision will likely come as soon as Friday, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the deliberations are private. AT&T spokesman Fletcher Cook declined to comment. Like many competitors, the second-largest U.S. wireless carrier is already offering alternative smartphones to people who return Note 7 devices. Samsung started replacing the Note 7 last month because of a flaw in its lithium battery that can lead to overheating and pose a burn hazard to customers. Airlines have banned customers from using the smartphones on flights, and the evacuation of a Southwest Airlines Co. plane earlier this week was blamed on smoke caused by a replacement device. AT&T’s move would be a further blow to Samsung. The wireless carrier is the third-biggest customer of the South Korean company, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Samsung is already facing a bill that analysts estimate stretching into the billions of dollars for the recall of 2.5 million Note 7 phones that it announced last month. A U.S.-based Samsung spokeswoman didn’t immediately have a comment.

Submission + - Baltimore Polilce Took 1 Million Surveillance Photos of City (go.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Baltimore Police on Friday released data showing that a surveillance plane secretly flew over the city roughly 100 times, taking more than 1 million snapshots of the streets below. Police held a news conference where they released logs tracking flights of the plane owned and operated by Persistent Surveillance Systems, which is promoting the aerial technology as a cutting-edge crime-fighting tool. The logs show the plane spent about 314 hours over eight months creating the chronological visual record. The program began in January and was not initially disclosed to Baltimore's mayor, city council or other elected officials. Now that it's public, police say the plane will fly over the city again as a terrorism prevention tool when Fleet Week gets underway on Monday, as well as during the Baltimore Marathon on Oct. 15. The logs show that the plane made flights ranging between one and five hours long in January and February, June, July and August. The flights stopped on Aug. 7, shortly before the program's existence was revealed in an article by Bloomberg Businessweek.

Submission + - Appeals Court Reinstates Apple's $120 Million Slide-To-Unlock Patent Win (bloomberg.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple Inc. won an appeals court ruling that reinstates a patent-infringement verdict it won against Samsung Electronics Co., including for its slide-to-unlock feature for smartphones and tablets. In an 8-3 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said a three-judge panel was wrong to throw out the $119.6 million verdict in February. Instead, it ordered the trial judge to consider whether the judgment should be increased based on any intentional infringement by Samsung. In this case, Apple claimed that Samsung infringed patents for the slide-to-unlock feature, autocorrect and a way to detect phone numbers so they can be tapped to make phone calls. The bulk of the award, $98.7 million, was for the detection patent that the earlier panel said wasn’t infringed. The February decision also said the other two patents were invalid. That was a wrong decision, the court ruled Friday, because it relied on issues that were never raised on appeal or on information that was beyond the trial record. “The jury verdict on each issue is supported by substantial evidence in the record,” Circuit Judge Kimberly Moore wrote for the majority.

Submission + - FBI Looks Into Unlocking Minnesota Mall Stabber's iPhone (cnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Minnesota man suspected of stabbing 10 people in a mall before police fatally shot him left behind his iPhone. Now, FBI agents are looking into unlocking his iPhone as part of the investigation. The FBI says Dahir Adan, 20, attacked several shoppers on September 17 in a frenzy, asking his victims if they were Muslim before he stabbed them. ISIS claimed responsibility for attack shortly after. FBI director James Comey told the House Judiciary Committee his agency is reviewing Adan's electronic devices — but is having issues getting into his iPhone. The device remains locked, as agents are "exploring technical and legal options," Minneapolis FBI spokesman Jeff Van Nest said. He declined to specify what model the iPhone was.

Submission + - Law-Defying Transistor Smashes Industry 'Limit', Measures Just 1nm

An anonymous reader writes: U.S. researchers have unveiled the world’s smallest transistor reported to date, combining a new mix of materials, which makes even the tiniest silicon-based transistor appear big in comparison. The team, led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, designed the minuscule transistor with a working one-nanometer gate – far surpassing any industry expectation for reducing transistor sizes. In the scientific study, the researchers describe a prototype device which uses a novel semiconductor material known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). The transistor structure uses a single-walled carbon nanotube as the gate electrode and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) for the channel material, rather than silicon. ‘The semiconductor industry has long assumed that any gate below 5 nanometers wouldn’t work, so anything below that was not even considered. This research shows that sub-5-nanometer gates should not be discounted. Industry has been squeezing every last bit of capability out of silicon. By changing the material from silicon to MoS2, we can make a transistor with a gate that is just 1 nanometer in length, and operate it like a switch,’ explained study lead Sujay Desai.

Submission + - Dallas Buyers Club Gives up chasing pirates in Australia

Harlequin80 writes: Dallas Buyers Club (DBC), the company behind the movie with the same name, has been trying to purse legal action against people they accuse of pirating their movie. In Australia they first sued iiNet, a major ISP, to gain access to their customer records which iiNet decided to fight in court. Though Judge Perram ruled that iiNet would have to surrender the details of the customers to DBC he applied very strict control orders to DBC. This started with a requirement to submit a draft of their letter to Justice Perram before he would release the customer details, upon seeing the contents of the letter he escalated the controls to requiring a significant bond of AU$600,000 and a rewrite of the letter removing most of the demands.

Finally he gave a deadline of tomorrow for a reasonable letter to be submitted or he would close the case with no further action allowed. The lawyers representing DBC have confirmed today that the deadline will pass with no submissions to Justice Perram on the matter which effectively stops any possibility of DBC pursuing people they believe pirated their film in Australia.

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