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Comment Re:The inverse Turing Test (Score 1) 160

So now we have an AI trying to decide who is the human, the inverse of the turing test. What it comes down to then is it easier to create an AI that can pass the Turing test or the inverse turing test. If it's easier for a bot to fool a bot then this AI strategy will meet it's match in another AI. On the other hand if it's easier to do the inverse turing test then this new strategy will work. I'm not really sure if it's obvious which test is harder.

Depends on how invasive you allow the inverse turing test to be. USB blood analyzers already exist, DNA analyzers that fit in your pocket may be built in my lifetime. (Obligatory Skynet reference.)

Comment Re:Biased? (Score 1) 51

The real comparison will be with the AMD Vega line, which is expected within the next month or two.

Nvidia is clearly worried that AMD have something good up their sleeves on that front, or we would not have seen a 1080 Ti with these specs at this price point.

Or maybe yields are better than expected. Or maybe the market analysis says that this price point results in more profit based on the marginal cost curve. Maybe they just have an aggressive new manager whose bonus is tied to units sold. To say "Nvidia is clearly worried" is putting an awful lot of certainty onto a purely speculative statement.

Comment Re:Faster than the Titan... (Score 1) 51

The "faster than a Titan" thing has been causing a bit of angst. The early reviews and benchmarks do indeed show that the 1080 Ti outperforms the Titan X (Pascal) in many cases. It's not universal; some games and benchmarks still favour the Titan by a tiny margin, but those are a minority.

But the sheer price of the Titan X (which was unprecedented in the Pascal series) has driven a lot of extra discontent this time around, especially as the 1080 Ti came out with a lower price than a lot of observers had been expecting (there were confident predictions from usually-reliable sources that it would be $200 north of where it actually landed). If you need a bit more salt in your diet, take a look at some of the threads over on the Nvidia forums today from disgruntled Titan X owners.

This is, however, pretty much par for the course in the high-end PC game and it's not as though Nvidia haven't slipped into a predictable cycle over their last few generations (at least since the 700-series) that makes clear how things work. If you want to buy a card that is "top of the range", you've basically got three options:

1) Buy the *80 card that arrives with the first wave of consumer cards in each generation. You will get a few months at the top of the tree, until the release of the (massively more expensive) Titan. This is always the cheapest of the three options, but also the most time-limited.

2) Buy the Titan that comes out a few months after the *80. This will have an absurd price tag - often twice that of the *80. It will be the fastest thing around for, in general, 6-9 months, and even then, the next card may only match it rather than beating it.

3) Buy the *80 Ti that comes out 6-9 months after the Titan. This will generally give you framerates in most games in the +/- 3% range of the Titan, but for a price much closer to the *80. This will hold its place at the top for anywhere from 9 to 15 months, until the release of the next generation of cards. In the next generation, the *80 will outperform the last generation *80 Ti and the *70 will offer broadly comparable (maybe slightly better) performance for around half the price.

I've been going for the *80 Ti route for a while now, on the grounds that the price/performance ratio tends to hold up better over time. I'm seeing complaints at the moment from people who bought a Titan within the last few weeks, which is just bizarre. The 1080 Ti has been known to be close to release since January, so why anybody would take the plunge on a Titan at $1200 under those circumstances is beyond me.

I'm working from home today and waiting for my 1080 Ti to be delivered. I wish I could say I'm not bouncing up and down in my chair going "SQUEEEEEE!!!" like a 12 year old girl at a One Direction concert, but I'm not sure how convincingly I could make that case.

The "faster than a Titan" thing has been causing a bit of angst. The early reviews and benchmarks do indeed show that the 1080 Ti outperforms the Titan X (Pascal) in many cases. It's not universal; some games and benchmarks still favour the Titan by a tiny margin, but those are a minority.

But the sheer price of the Titan X (which was unprecedented in the Pascal series) has driven a lot of extra discontent this time around, especially as the 1080 Ti came out with a lower price than a lot of observers had been expecting (there were confident predictions from usually-reliable sources that it would be $200 north of where it actually landed). If you need a bit more salt in your diet, take a look at some of the threads over on the Nvidia forums today from disgruntled Titan X owners.

This is, however, pretty much par for the course in the high-end PC game and it's not as though Nvidia haven't slipped into a predictable cycle over their last few generations (at least since the 700-series) that makes clear how things work. If you want to buy a card that is "top of the range", you've basically got three options:

1) Buy the *80 card that arrives with the first wave of consumer cards in each generation. You will get a few months at the top of the tree, until the release of the (massively more expensive) Titan. This is always the cheapest of the three options, but also the most time-limited.

2) Buy the Titan that comes out a few months after the *80. This will have an absurd price tag - often twice that of the *80. It will be the fastest thing around for, in general, 6-9 months, and even then, the next card may only match it rather than beating it.

3) Buy the *80 Ti that comes out 6-9 months after the Titan. This will generally give you framerates in most games in the +/- 3% range of the Titan, but for a price much closer to the *80. This will hold its place at the top for anywhere from 9 to 15 months, until the release of the next generation of cards. In the next generation, the *80 will outperform the last generation *80 Ti and the *70 will offer broadly comparable (maybe slightly better) performance for around half the price.

I've been going for the *80 Ti route for a while now, on the grounds that the price/performance ratio tends to hold up better over time. I'm seeing complaints at the moment from people who bought a Titan within the last few weeks, which is just bizarre. The 1080 Ti has been known to be close to release since January, so why anybody would take the plunge on a Titan at $1200 under those circumstances is beyond me.

I'm working from home today and waiting for my 1080 Ti to be delivered. I wish I could say I'm not bouncing up and down in my chair going "SQUEEEEEE!!!" like a 12 year old girl at a One Direction concert, but I'm not sure how convincingly I could make that case.

Your analysis looks at the market timing, but it makes a lot of sense given how chib fabs run, as well. The *80 chips are likely what they are confident they can produce from the beginning, the Titans are likely the higher-binned parts, and the *80 Ti come out once all the fab issues have been ironed out and more chips are meeting that bin spec. It makes perfect sense that for each generation, the *80 Ti takes time for the fab to mature, but usually would come close to the Titan.

Comment Re:I'm hungry (Score 1) 469

Seems to me the apps are reducing the problems for everyone

Except the people living in the rat runs. Pollution goes up, health deteriorates and costs increase. Accidents increase, insurance goes up. Property prices decrease, they can't use the street for other things any more.

There is a reason that major roads are kept separate from where people live.

Not only that, but one of the largest causes of congestion on highways is on/off ramps. If traffic on the on/off ramps increases, overall traffic might increase too. There's a particularly bad example of this on my commute at 29.9378728,-95.4454552. The eastbound highway has an exit onto the feeder road, followed shortly by the entrance ramp. The feeder road has no stoplights in between the exit and onramps. Waze often tells me to take the exit and then re-enter the highway. Traffic is often backed up here at peak times, but clears up after the entrance ramp.

It is clear that Waze is promoting a route which makes traffic worse in this case. You can watch it unfold as someone takes the offramp and then tries to merge back on, causing slowdowns. This is a very clear case, there are likely many others which may not be so obvious.

Comment Re:China's control is often overestimated (Score 1) 233

I suggest to any interested parties that they read Victor Cha's book "The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future". Cha worked for a lot of different US administrations in dealing with North Korea and having actually been there and participated in negotiations, he has an insider's look at things. Basically, China has more influence than they are willing to use, but not as much as outsiders think. China paid a real price in blood to defend the North in the Korean War. One of Mao's own sons was killed in the conflict, although if you look up the information about this, you may realize that he put himself in jeopardy when it happened. China seems to have used what I will call a brute force approach to the war after entering it, but simply throwing huge amounts of soldiers into battle and suffering horrific casualties, but winning enough ground to push UN forces back about to the current dividing line. Even though the vast majority of the Chinese Communist Party leadership either were kids when this happened or not born yet, the CCP does still like to bring this up. They still drill into school children in China about how Mao himself lost a son in the conflict. The Soviet Union and China had been vying for position and influence in North Korea and Kim Il Sung was a master of playing them off each other. In fact, the whole reason they have nuclear weapons is because the Soviet Union gave them their reactors and the technical know-how that led to them developing the weapon. When the Soviet Union collapsed, Boris Yeltsin immediately cut off all aid to North Korea, leaving China to look around and sort of say "What just happened?" China picked up the slack in terms of providing aid. Some of this is because of the shared legacy of the Korean War. A lot of it is that China benefits big time from North Korea's existence. North Korea has a lot of rare earth deposits which China gets at a huge discount for helping them. And as North Korea borders a Chinese province with a very large ethnic Korean population (China took it by force from an old Korean kingdom almost 800 years ago), China fears that if the North Korean government collapses, there will be a humanitarian crisis and tons of illegal immigrants will flee into China in desperation. China is telling the truth when they say they want stability in the peninsula and when they say they want it denuclearized, but China sees the status quo as totally in their favor and views all changes as bad outcomes for China, so there are real limits as how far they will push things. Here's what China fears if North Korea collapses. 1) A huge influx of refugees will cross the border, causing China to have to spend large amounts of resources to feed and house them and it will take away from using these resources to keep their own population in check. 2) International aid organizations will likely demand access to China to help, which China doesn't want. 3) North Korea's nuclear weapons could end up in South Korea's hands, which China doesn't want. 4) A united Korea would definitely be a US ally. It could be that instead of the US leaving, that the US ends up having military bases in the former North Korea and thus are right on China's doorstep. 5) China will no longer get North Korean rare earths at a bargain price. In fact, there may be so much resentment towards China for helping to prop up the North Korean government that those rare earths go anywhere but China. China realizes that eventually the North Korean state will collapse. But they hope to push that date as far into the future as possible as, like I said, they view all post-North Korean outcomes as very bad for them. Note too that China is very good at the duplicity game of telling outside countries that they need to do something which China itself is unwilling to do. I get that they don't like THADD going to South Korea, and personally I think that sending it there should never have been made public, but their lack of interest in really turning the screws on North Korea has led to this and they seem unwilling to accept their own responsibility here.

Having been to North Korea myself, I think we are only seeing part of the picture. It is also worth noting that North Koreans seem to dislike both the Chinese government and Chinese people, since they are frequently taken advantage by both. Their attitude towards the US government is also very negative, but they are neutral to friendly to US citizens.

I have to disagree that North Korea will eventually collapse. Despite all the sanctions and other efforts by the US, and the death of the leader twice, it hasn't happened. For 50 years, we thought that Cuba would also collapse. It didn't, and it seems much more likely that slow reforms will be the way of adaptation. Such slow reforms are already happening in North Korea- there have been big changes in how collective farms are structured, which includes a reduction in the state's share of the harvest, and other, almost capitalist-like elements.

It would be tremendously helpful if a current (not former) US Secretary of State went to North Korea, recognized them formally as a sovereign nuclear state, and committed to putting an embassy in Pyongyang. This might rattle China's teacup a little bit, and recognizing North Korea as a sovereign state might annoy South Korean hardliners, but it would be the best move for the current situation. Anything less will continue on the path of escalation we are on, and trying for a larger negotiation goal is unlikely to succeed. The issues of nuclear weapons, military exercises, reunification, etc should be left for an official ambassador to work on, since they will take years and the success of those negotiations is not necessary in the short term.

Comment Re: North Korea unstable (Score 1) 233

The stuff you smoke seems to be really good and makes you delusional. Might you share what you are using?

"not hard to negotiate a cooldown" - well, if you think it is easy I am sure the UN is happy to have you as their next negotiator with the leadership of NK.

It's called "try to consider the other side's point of view". Maybe you should try it sometime. North Korea's main 3 goals are (based on my firsthand discussions with North Koreans):
1. Continue existing as an independent state
2. End the economic sanctions / develop the economy
3. A desire for reunification, poorly defined on the details of how that would work, but possibly as some kind of 1 commonwealth, 2-state solution similar to China's One country, two systems approach

China supports 1, since it keeps a democratic nation off their doorstep.
China doesn't support 2, since it would allow foreign competition in, and an economically strong North Korea would be a compeditor.
China doesn't support 3, since a consolidated Korea would likely be closer to the West.

The USA should support 1, despite all the rhetoric to the contrary. North Korea is still a convenient buffer zone between the two largest military powers in the world, and sometimes a Sadaam Hussein is better than chaos.
The USA doesn't support 2, since the USA would gain nothing, and would lose pride/face since North Korea has no negotiating power.
The USA doesn't support 3, since it would be bad in the short and long term for both our ally South Korea and our trading partner China.

I don't know enough about South Korea to comment, but I would imagine they are probably split on most or all of these issues.

Considering all that, the most reasonable "cooldown" would be for the US to formally end the Korean War, recognize North Korea as an independent nuclear state, and commit to putting a US embassy in Pyongyang. A single visit by a US President or active-duty Secretary of State could probably accomplish all this without giving up any negotiating power on the more difficult topics, or rocking regional geopolitics too much.

Comment Re:My nose smells BS (Score 2) 92

You don't leave a 6 figure job because of "lack of confidence in management." You just don't.

Well, you're wrong. I have done exactly this.

I left Toshiba more than 5 years ago. My job wasn't difficult, the pay was good, and my immediate supervisor and coworkers were OK to deal with. However, even back then, it was clear that at higher levels, they were making a lot of bad deals that looked good in the short term, but were not good in the long term. They also were transferring power from proven, profitable departments, to recent acquisitions that were questionably run. The only surprise to me about their recent financial problems is how long it has taken for these to come to fruition.

When one sees that a company's future viability is questionable, the choice to leave is not difficult. "Lack of confidence in management" doesn't fully describe all the factors considered when one leaves a company under such circumstances.

Comment Re: North Korea unstable (Score 2) 233

No, North Korea is extremely poor, has few natural resources, and can not feed its people.

North Korea's nuclear posture is an extortion racket, intended to increase foreign aid. It worked for quite a while - they got money in return for not developing nuclear weapons.

Unfortunately, some US administrations decided to act tough, and North Korea simply increased the threat in order to extract aid.

This is a very simplistic view of things, and doesn't even make sense. They are building nuclear weapons to gain more foreign aid? They aren't stupid, it is exceedingly easy to forsee that their nuclear program would have the opposite effect. They haven't exactly tried to keep their nuclear program a secret.

North Korea is effectively a buffer zone between the 2 most powerful military powers in the world. They know this, and the Korean War never actually ended, as any North Korean will tell you. The US conducts massive military exercises on their doorstep every Spring. "Defensive only", the USA says. "What's with the amphibious assault exercises then?", the DPRK responds. It doesn't help that various countries have tried to make Korea their colonial bitch going back 150 years. The west reinforces this fear with yearly exercises, military planning to assassinate the leader, invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, military action in Syria, Pakistan, etc. North Koreans have a very legitimate fear of foreign invasion or regime change.

The nuclear program is intended to ensure North Korea's survival. They are in a precarious position, an animal in a corner considering their geographical location and geopolitical status. North Koreans aren't stupid, and know they will lose a shooting war, nuclear weapons or not. But on the other hand, no nuclear state has ever been invaded by a foreign power. It's the sharpest tooth a nation can bare.

Comment Re:Sealed for freshness (Score 2) 223

it would be trivial to get rid of the connector, they already have magsafe yet the morons there ditched it for the inferior Usb-C.

Dont expect real innovation from apple anymore. the left overs in job's office are now gone, it's all about profits and margin now. Even Johnny Ives is phoning everything in now.

My IP69-rated Sonim XP6 phone has a magsafe charging connector. It also has a headphone port (with a cover).

Headphone ports are not that difficult to seal. The Galaxy S4 Active and S5 had waterproof headphone jacks, and they didn't even need a cover to do it.

Comment Re:meh....plans & contracts (Score 2) 61

I don't want plans or contracts... but that seems to be what the war is over.

When the big companies come down in price, the MVNOs come down too. I have 2 lines, one on Straight Talk for $45/mo with 5GB + unlimited edge, and the other on H2O wireless with 3GB/mo + unlimited edge for $30/mo. H2O wireless has been a 4 week experiment so far, but I have seen 0 difference in coverage between the two lines and will probably move the Straight Talk line over to H20. The H20 wireless plan was about $10 more expensive 12 months ago. Other prepaid MVNOs have come down in price too. All the SIM cards in stores have the wrong monthly prices on them. It's a great time to own your own phone.

Comment Re:Microsoft want a piece of the pie (Score 1) 307

Microsoft look enviously at Apple, who get to control and profit from their walled garden. Then they glance over at Android, and see Google has their play store (which, whereas it may not be a walled garden, has a fence around). Fire users most certainly have their own walled garden courtesy of Amazon.

Apple and Google are both benefiting from these "almost monopolies" they run controlling their users, skimming a bit off the top from everyone. No doubt, Microsoft sees that these are profitable ventures and they want the same control over what runs on Microsoft Windows. It's a little harder to do because there is a lot of legacy applications, and neither consumer, nor software producers want to give a little bit of each purchase to Microsoft. Microsoft are going to continue baby-stepping towards that goal though because they want the money, and their competitors are already doing that.

It will be a sad day when you have no option but to buy from the Microsoft store, but that day is coming.

It's already a sad day because most companies now seem interested only in skimming a little bit of someone elses' profit rather than making an actual product themselves.

Comment Re:reactions were mixed (Score 1) 153

I've read a story somewhere about the manager of an engineering department dealing with critical systems at NASA during the space race. He imposed 9 to 5 work days, as part of his plan to promote a healthy routine. He noticed that overwork leads to mistakes and that nullifies any productivity gain made during extra hours.

It is absolutely true. For work in the trades (machinists, welders, etc), we see the majority of accidents occurring in the final 2 hours of a 12 hour shift. It is naive to think that white collar people don't suffer from fatigue too. The CDC even hosts a study titled "Overtime and Extended Work Shifts: Recent (not so recent now) Findings on Illnesses, Injuries, and Health Behaviors" showing that there may be profound effects on the long-term health of workers as well.

Comment Re:Only? (Score 3, Interesting) 153

The Japanese put in a lot of hours, but not much of that is "working". Japan's productivity is only 60% of America's. There is a social taboo to leave work before your boss, so people stay late and surf the web. The bosses are promoted based on seniority rather than ability, and are often incompetent with no incentive to take the initiative on more enlightened working conditions. It is better to just stick to prevailing social conventions and keep a low profile.

America: The squeaky wheel gets the grease. Japan: The nail that sticks up will be hammered back down.

I have worked in Japanese companies for almost 8 years in total, 7 months of which was in Japan. Everything in your post is true except "so people stay late and surf the web". This is not my experience. In my experience, people stay late and do NOT surf the web. The open floor plan in most Japanese offices makes goofing off unnoticed nearly impossible.

Some people are doing productive work, but slowly. Others were doing unproductive work (again, slowly). Others take frequent visits to other people in different departments. Meetings which require 2-3 people but 8 people are invited also help run up the man hours. Surfing the web for non-work reasons was strictly during lunch hours and breaks, I never saw it.

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