Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - APT Speed for Incremental Updates Got Massive Performance Boost

jones_supa writes: Developer Julian Andres Klode has this week made some improvements to significantly increase the speed of incremental updates with Debian GNU/Linux's APT update system. His optimizations have yielded the apt-get program to suddenly yield 10x performance when compared to the old code. These improvements also make APT with PDiff now faster than the default, non-incremental behavior. Beyond the improvements that landed this week, Julian is still exploring other areas for improving APT update performance. More details via his blog post.

Submission + - How do you revoke and re-issue a biometric credential? (

technicalnotebook writes: An interesting thought to come out of all the media surrounding Heartbleed over the last week. What would happen if the main mechanism of authentication used today was biometric authentication... this is not something that could simply be revoked and re-issued if your credentials were compromised.

So I thought I would pose this to the brains trust that is Slashdot, what *could* we do if something similar to Heartbleed happened following the more mainstream adoption of biometric authentication (assuming that in certain cases the credentials were stored server-side rather than locally for verification).

Interesting puzzle to ponder (and I would love to hear Slashdotter's thoughts).

Submission + - First custom Rom for Samsung Galaxy S5 is out for users! (

hateman20 writes: Just after few days of release of the Samsung Galaxy S5, the one of senior member of XDA has brought a first custom Rom for Galaxy S5. The Rom is one of very popular one, Omega Rom. Built to give high performance and loaded with tons of new application, features and many advance utilities to improve the usability and customize the phone in own way. Visit the source link to read more and install this Rom.

Submission + - Rome 'Was Founded 200 Years Earlier Than Previously Thought' (

concertina226 writes: Archaeologists excavating Lapis Niger, an ancient shrine in the Roman Forum, have found a wall that predates Rome's official founding year of 753BC by up to two hundred years.

According to Italian newspaper Il Messagero, the wall was made from blocks of volcanic tuff, the product of volcanic eruptions, and was designed to channel water from the small river Spino, a tributary of The Tiber.

Near the remains of the wall, the archaeologists also found fragments of ceramic pottery and the remains of food in the form of grains.

"The examination of the ceramic material was crucial, allowing us today to fix the wall chronologically between the 9th century and the beginning of the 8th century," said Patricia Fortini, an archaeologist working for Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali di Roma Capitale, a state-funded organisation in charge of all historical, archaeological and artistic monuments found in Rome.

Submission + - Japan surpasses Kyoto Protocol emission target 1

AmiMoJo writes: Japan's environment minister says the country has surpassed the target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions that it pledged under the Kyoto Protocol on global warming. Japan had lowered emissions by a 5-year average of 8.4 percent in the 2012 financial year compared to 1990 levels, more than the 6-percent goal the country pledged under the Kyoto Protocol. The 2012 figures are significant as they include the first full year after the March 11th Tohoku earthquake disaster, during which no nuclear power was available.

Submission + - Netflix's Comcast deal boosts video speed (

lewisbasil writes: The data released Monday by Netflix Inc. may become another flash point in a debate about whether the Federal Communications Commission should draw up new rules to ensure that all online content providers are treated the same by Internet service providers.

Submission + - Humans Are Taking Jobs From Robots in Japan

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Bloomberg reports that humans are taking the place of machines in plants across Japan so workers can develop new skills and figure out ways to improve production lines and the car-building process. “We need to become more solid and get back to basics, to sharpen our manual skills and further develop them,” says Mitsuru Kawai, a half century-long company veteran tapped by President Akio Toyoda to promote craftsmanship at Toyota’s plants. “When I was a novice, experienced masters used to be called gods (Kami-sama in Japanese), and they could make anything.”

According to Kawai, learning how to make car parts from scratch gives younger workers insights they otherwise wouldn’t get from picking parts from bins and conveyor belts, or pressing buttons on machines. At about 100 manual-intensive workspaces introduced over the last three years across Toyota’s factories in Japan, these lessons can then be applied to reprogram machines to cut down on waste and improve processes. In an area Kawai directly supervises at the forging division of Toyota’s Honsha plant, workers twist, turn and hammer metal into crankshafts instead of using the typically automated process. Experiences there have led to innovations in reducing levels of scrap and shortening the production line and Kawai also credits manual labor for helping workers improve production of axle beams and cut the costs of making chassis parts. “We cannot simply depend on the machines that only repeat the same task over and over again,” says Kawai. “To be the master of the machine, you have to have the knowledge and the skills to teach the machine.”

Submission + - U.S. Biomedical Research 'Unsustainable,' Prominent Researchers Warn (

sciencehabit writes: The U.S. biomedical science system "is on an unsustainable path" and needs major reform, four prominent researchers say. Researchers should "confront the dangers at hand,” the authors write, and “rethink” how academic research is funded, staffed, and organized. Among other issues, the team suggests that the system may be producing too many new researchers and forcing them to compete for a stagnating pool of funding.

Submission + - The Corrosive Effect of Surveillance Society ( 1

An anonymous reader writes: Crikey warns that government obsession with secrecy while violating its own citiziens' privacy has backfired. We've also learnt that government employees will abuse private information. They can't help it. There have been 15,000 cases of NSA employees abuses (including stalking women) and all over the world police and even city employees abuse private data about citizens, and is now harming relations amongst friendly nations, undermining business and public trust in the governent. Was it worth it? Crikey argues not.

A "Photon Machine Gun" For Quantum Computers 143

An anonymous reader writes "Generating entangled photons in a reliable way is impossible right now, stalling the development of the optical quantum computers that would use entangled photons as quantum bits (qubits). Because entangled photons can only be produced at random — which takes time — the most powerful optical quantum computing device use only 6 qubits. UK and Israeli quantum physicists have designed a blueprint for a 'quantum machine gun' that fires out barrages of entangled photons on demand. They think within a few years this device will be built, and could lead to quantum computing using 20 to 30 qubits. Every additional qubit doubles the computing power, so these quantum computers could outperform any existing classical computer, the researchers say. The quantum machine gun is described as 'one of the most exciting theoretical proposals I've read in five years' by a leading quantum physicist." The research was published in Physical Review Letters earlier this month.

NASA's Space Plans Take Another Hit 12

coondoggie writes "The folks at the Government Accountability Office have not been all that kind to NASA in recent years, and today they issued another damning report on the future of the manned space flight program. NASA is still struggling to develop a solid business case — including firm requirements, mature technologies, a knowledge-based acquisition strategy, a realistic cost estimate, and sufficient funding and time — needed to justify moving the Constellation program, which includes the two main spaceflight components, the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, forward into the implementation phase, the GAO stated."

Alzheimer's Disease Possibly Linked To Sleep Deprivation 164

sonnejw0 writes "NewScientist is reporting a link between sleep deprivation and Alzheimer's Disease via an increased amyloid-beta plaque load thought responsible for a large part of the symptoms of the disease, in mice. Medication to abrogate insomnia reduced the plaque load. Also discussed is a recently discovered sleep cycle of amyloid-beta deposition in the brain, in which levels decrease while asleep. 'Holtzman also tried sending the mice to sleep with a drug that is being trialled for insomnia, called Almorexant. This reduced the amount of plaque-forming protein. He suggests that sleeping for longer could limit the formation of plaques, and perhaps block it altogether.'"

FDA OKs First Human Trial of Neural Stem Cell Therapy 149

An anonymous reader sends word that the FDA has approved a phase 1 trial for Neuralstem, a company with a patented stem cell procedure targeting ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) and other spinal conditions. The company's CEO said in a press release, "While this trial aims to primarily establish safety and feasibility data in treating ALS patients, we also hope to be able to measure a slowing down of the ALS degenerative process." Results are expected in 2 years. The trial will involve 12 ALS patients who will receive stem cell injections in the lumbar area of the spinal cord. An information site for the disabled community adds hopefully: "If it makes it through all stages of testing, we will see if doctors are willing to [use] it on subjects that have injuries coming from physical injuries like diving accidents."

E. Coli Can Be Used To Clean Up Nuclear Waste 102

jerryjamesstone writes "Researchers have found that E. coli can be used to recover uranium from tainted waters and can even be used to clean up nuclear waste. Using the bacteria along with inositol phosphate, the bacteria breaks down the phosphate — also called phytic acid — to free the phosphate molecules. The phosphate then binds to the uranium forming a uranium-phosphate precipitate on the cells of the bacteria. Those cells can then be harvested to recover the uranium." What has made this 14-year-old process economically feasible is the use of inositol phosphate, which is a cheap waste material from the production feedstock from plant material.

Slashdot Top Deals

Not only is UNIX dead, it's starting to smell really bad. -- Rob Pike