Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Submission + - What Snowden and Manning Don't Understand About Secrecy 4

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Investigative journalist Mark Bowden writes in the Atlantic that what is troubling about Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden is not that they broke the oaths they swore when they took their classified government jobs, but the indiscriminate nature of their leaks proceeding from a Julian Assange-influenced, comic-book vision of the world where all governments are a part of an evil plot against humanity. Bowden, the author of "Black Hawk Down" and "The Finish: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden", says there are many legitimate reasons for governments to keep secrets among them the need to preserve the element of surprise in military operations or criminal investigations, to permit leaders and diplomats to bargain candidly, and to protect the identities of those we ask to perform dangerous and difficult missions and the most famous leakers in American history were motivated not by a general opposition to secrecy but by a desire to expose specific wrongdoing. "Mark Felt, the “Deep Throat” who helped steer Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s Watergate reporting, understood that the Nixon Administration was energetically abusing the powers of the presidency. Daniel Ellsberg copied and leaked the Pentagon Papers because they showed that the White House and Pentagon had never really believed the lies they were telling about the Vietnam War." There have been a few things in the Manning and Snowden leaks that might have warranted taking a principled stand says Bowden, but the great bulk of what they delivered shows our nation’s military, intelligence agencies, and foreign service working hard at their jobs — doing the things we the people, through our elected representatives, have ordered them to do. "Both Manning and Snowden strike me not as heroes, but as naifs. Neither appears to have understood what they were getting themselves into, and, more importantly, what they were doing."

Submission + - Linux Vendors Push for Open-Source in Hybrid Datacenter Clouds (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Linux vendors Red Hat and SUSE are pushing to make sure Linux-based virtual machines are an important part of datacenter-based hybrid clouds. The two are taking significantly different tacks toward the same destination, however. SUSE is using the visibility and cloud hype of VMware by extending its partnership with the virtualization provider to promote its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for VMware as an alternative operating system for virtual machines running on VMware’s vCloud Hybrid Service. Red Hat is happy to include VMware in its plans, but isn’t limiting itself either to VMware-based clouds or, in fact, the idea that a Linux vendor has to tag along with a cloud- or virtualization developer to find its place in mixed infrastructures. “We do not buy into the premise that a private or a hybrid platform based on one vendor’s technologies and products is the answer,” wrote Bryan Che, general manager of Red Hat’s Cloud Business Unit. More than 25 percent of customers want clouds or datacenter infrastructures using virtualization products from more than one vendor, according to a buyers’ guide published in August by market researcher IDC.

Submission + - Researchers reverse-engineer Dropbox cracking heavily obfuscated Python app

rjmarvin writes: Two developers were able to successfully reverse-engineer Dropbox http://sdt.bz/64049 to intercept SSL traffic, bypass two-factor authentication and create open-source clients. They presented their paper, "Looking inside the (drop) box" at USENIX 2013, explaining step-by-step how they were able to succeed where others failed in reverse-engineering a heavily obfuscated application written in Python. They also claimed the generic techniques they used could be applied to reverse-engineer other Frozen python applications: OpenStack, NASA, and a host of Google apps, just to name a few...

Submission + - London Internet Exchange Brings Euro-Style Exchange Model to US (datacenterknowledge.com)

miller60 writes: The London Internet Exchange (LINX) is teaming with Dutch data center provider EvoSwitch to start a European-style neutral internet exchange in northern Virginia. In the European model, traffic exchanges are managed by participants, rather than the colocation providers hosting the infrastructure. LINX will launch in EvoSwitch's Manassas facility, but also build a fiber ring to expand the exchange to at least two other sites in Virginia. The project is part of a broader effort to launch Euro-style exchanges as an alternative to Equinix and other commercial network hubs focused in single facilities. In London, the LINX spans 10 data centers run by four different colo providers.

Submission + - The lies of Brian Deer .. (youtube.com)

An anonymous reader writes: 'Who is Brian Deer? Vigilante for truth or front man for Big Pharma? Selective Hearing covers Deer's part in the heartbreaking betrayal of vaccine damaged children by the medical profession, the pharmaceutical corporations and the British government.`

An Open Letter to Brian Deer Rebutting His Article

Submission + - Pastafarian Rally physically attacked by Moscow police, 8 arrested (huffingtonpost.com)

drfuchs writes: `Glorification of the Great Flying Spaghetti Monster offends [our] religious feelings [which is against the law]' explained the leader of a Russian Orthodox group that joined in the melee. The Huffington Post has a `video show[ing] members of the police chasing Pastafarians through the streets, who can be recognized by the strainers on their heads.' Not to mention their otherwise generally nerdy appearance.

Submission + - Appeal Of Xiaomi's Hongmi And Other Low End Smartphones (gizmobeast.com)

jarold writes: Xiaomi, perceived as a budget version of Apple in China, ruffled the market when its low end smartphone Hongmi ( which means red rice ) sold 100,000 units in 90 seconds. This and other cheap yet capable smartphones are especially appealing to the masses and emerging markets. Selling for half the price of known models from Apple and Samsung, they offer the same basic experience like web surfing, gaming, photo and video recording.
Apple is reportedly working on a lower-priced smartphone to sell, but it may already be too late.

Submission + - X.Org Foundation Loses 501(c)3 "Non-Profit" Status (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The X.Org Foundation that is the organization behind driving the X.Org Server projects, Mesa, and Wayland open-source programs had their 501(c)3 status revoked by the IRS. It turns out the X.Org Foundation lost their 501(c)3 status after quite a lot of work to become a non-profit organization with guidance from the Software Freedom Law Center, but they got in trouble after failing to routinely file their taxes on time. There's also been a host of other X.Org accounting errors in recent years. There was also the recent news of the IRS going after open-source projects too.

Submission + - The Causes of Thursday's NASDAQ Crash (informationweek.com)

CowboyRobot writes: Despite there being apparent evidence of an online attack, that does not seem to be the case.
Available clues point to a data feed error. Outages at exchanges are actually not very rare, and hacking is seldom the cause.
In fact, rodents are a much more likely suspect. One of the more embarrassing Nasdaq outages occurred in 1994, when a kamikaze squirrel triggered 34 minutes of downtime. And that was the second 'rodent incident' in seven years.

Submission + - Confirmed: ChromeCast will be able to play local content (muktware.com)

sfcrazy writes: As you all know about the story that ChromeCast update disabled the playback of local content. Many though, including me that Google is going Apple's path. But Google has confirmed that it will allow every kind of content. Google Statement: We’re excited to bring more content to Chromecast and would like to support all types of apps, including those for local content. It's still early days for the Google Cast SDK, which we just released in developer preview for early development and testing only. We expect that the SDK will continue to change before we launch out of developer preview, and want to provide a great experience for users and developers before making the SDK and additional apps more broadly available. So no need to fear!

Submission + - Break Microsoft Up

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Tom Worstall writes in Forbes that the that the only way to get around the entrenched culture that has made Microsoft a graveyard for the kind of big ideas that have inspired companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon is to split the company up so as to remove conflicts between new and old products and with Ballmer's departure instead of finding someone new to run the company, bring in experts to handle the legal side and find suitable CEOs for the new companies. "The underlying problem for Microsoft is that the computing market has rapidly left behind the company's basic strategy of controlling the machines that people use with operating-system software," says Erik Sherman. "The combination of mobile devices that broke Microsoft's grip on the client end, and cloud computing that didn't necessarily need the company in data centers, shattered this form of control." Anyone can see how easily you could split off the gaming folks, business division, retail stores, and hardware division says John Dvorak. Each entity would have agreements in place for long-term supply of software and services. "This sort of shake up would ferret out all the empire builders and allow for new and more creative structures to emerge. And since everyone will have to be in a semi-startup mode, the dead wood will be eliminated by actual hard work."

Submission + - Lord Blair: we need laws to stop 'principled' leaking of state secrets (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tougher laws are needed to prevent members of the public from revealing official secrets, former Metropolitan police commissioner Lord Blair has said.

The peer insisted there was material the state had to keep secret, and powers had to be in place to protect it.

The intervention comes after police seized what they said were thousands of classified documents from David Miranda – the partner of Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who has been reporting leaks from the former US intelligence officer Edward Snowden.

The Home Office has defended the use of anti-terrorism laws to detain and question Miranda at Heathrow airport earlier this month.

Slashdot Top Deals

A debugged program is one for which you have not yet found the conditions that make it fail. -- Jerry Ogdin

Working...