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Submission + - Supreme Court Approves Warrantless Home Searches (nytimes.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: The New York Times reports that the Supreme Court has ruled, by a vote of 8 to 1, that police may enter a home and collect evidence even without a warrant, if after knocking on the door and announcing themselves they "hear evidence being destroyed." Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg , who cast the lone dissenting vote, mused: "How 'secure' do our homes remain if police, armed with no warrant, can pound on doors at will and, on hearing sounds indicative of things moving, forcibly enter and search for evidence of unlawful activity?"

Submission + - FBI: If We Told You, You Might Sue Us (aclu.org)

Gunkerty Jeb writes: So these guys over at the ACLU filed a Freedom of Information Act with the FBI regarding the interpretation and implementation of the FISA Amendments Act. Last November, the government released a few hundred heavily redacted documents.
Despite redactions, the documents confirmed that the government had interpreted the statute in as broad a sense as we were afraid they might, and that the government had repeatedly violated the few limitations that the statute actually imposed. No real surprise there.
However, that is not the point. The real point is that the documents reveal that the government doesn't want you to know whether your internet or phone company is cooperating with their surveillance program not out of concern for national security, but rather for fear we may become upset and file lawsuits asserting our constitutional rights.


Submission + - How To Hijack a Friend's Facebook Account (conceivablytech.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The security loophole described in this report allows an ex or frenemy to hijack your Facebook account within few minutes. It was discovered at University of Illinois and was reported immediately to Facebook. Interestingly and very surprisingly, other websites such as allfacebook.com pulled the report off their website. It is not confirmed whether Facebook has plugged the loophole.

Submission + - DHS Wants Mozilla To Disable Mafiaafire Plugin (wordpress.com)

Davis Freeberg writes: "The Department of Homeland Security is hard at work again, protecting the industry from websites that the big studios don't want you to see. This time they're targeting the Mafiaafire plugin by asking Mozilla to disable the addon at the root level. Instead of blindly complying with the government's request, Mozilla has decieded to ask some tough questions instead. Unsurprisingly, when faced with legitimate concerns about the legality of their domain seizure program, the DHS has decided to clam up."
The Courts

Submission + - RIAA drops another case (blogspot.com)

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: "Once again the RIAA has dropped a case "with prejudice", this time after concluding it was the defendant's daughter, rather than the defendant, that it should have sued in the first place. In a White Plains, New York, case, Lava v. Amurao, mindful that in similar scenarios it has been held liable for the defendant's attorneys fees (Capitol v. Foster and Atlantic v. Andersen), the RIAA this time went on the offensive over its attorneys fee exposure, even though there was no attorneys fee motion pending, arguing that it was the defendant's fault — and not the RIAA's — that the record companies sued the wrong person, because the defendant didn't tell them that his daughter was the file sharer they were looking for."

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